Deciding between Pro-E and Solidworks

Deciding between Pro-E and Solidworks

Post by ne-iowa » Wed, 04 Dec 2002 21:56:01



For those of you who have used both Pro-E and Solidworks, which do you
prefer, and why? Please, also tell me what you're designing. I do tool and
die, and special machine design, and am trying to decide which of these two
products to switch to. TIA
 
 
 

Deciding between Pro-E and Solidworks

Post by Alex Sh » Thu, 05 Dec 2002 01:23:00



Quote:> For those of you who have used both Pro-E and Solidworks, which do you
> prefer, and why? Please, also tell me what you're designing. I do tool and
> die, and special machine design, and am trying to decide which of these
two
> products to switch to. TIA

Search the archive of this group on www.google.com. This topic has been
discussed so many times that you will find more than you will want to read.

I have expressed my personal opinion (in favor of Pro/E) in a discussion
that you can find if you do your Google search using 'The difference between
Pro/E2001 and Solidworks2001' as a keyword. It probably will not hurt to
also limit the time frame of your search to April 2002 (when this particular
discussion was happening on this NG).

I have actually done the search and here is the link to result:

http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&threadm=ubs74pqgmb...
corp.supernews.com&rnum=1&prev=/groups%3Fhl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DISO-8859-1%2
6q%3DThe%2Bdifference%2Bbetween%2BPro%252FE2001%2Band%2BSolidworks2001%26btn
G%3DGoogle%2BSearch%26meta%3D

To my surprise, Google also shows that this discussion actually spilled over
into the SolidWorks NG, so you might as well search there, too.

If you have a problem finding the stuff, let me know and I will find it and
send the link to you. I just don't think it's worth the time to rehash it
for everybody all over again.
--
Alex Shishkin

http://home1.gte.net/res025wf/index.htm

 
 
 

Deciding between Pro-E and Solidworks

Post by Joel Moor » Thu, 05 Dec 2002 04:58:21


I was a ProE user from version 6 or 7 to version 20 (6 or 7 years,
maybe?).  I did a lot of fairly advanced (IMHO) surfacing with it as well
as some mildly complex assemblies and even some Pro/NC machining.  I
loved it as much as I hated it.

I've been using SW for about a 1/2 year and while I haven't had to do
anything too fancy with surfaces I have to say SW's capabilities in this
area aren't as robust.  In my opinion ProE excels with complex surfaces.

ProE's assembly structures are much more rigid and limiting but also as a
result more predictable.  When assemblies failed it was very easy to tell
why and fix it.  SW's "loose" assembly requirements tend to cause trouble
for me with conflicting mates and it's very easy to get confused about
what depends on what (again, my opinion--that could be a result of using
ProE for so long).

We decided to go with SW here at my new job mainly for the choices in 3rd
party programs the superior UI.  Price wasn't that much of a concern
since PTC has drastically reduced their prices to compete with the likes
of SW.  However, SW maintenance plan is optional and that is a plus.  PTC
is ruthless when it comes to back maintenance.  My previous employer let
the maintenance contract go for several years since it wasn't a financial
priority for a company falling to pieces.  Once we managed to get back on
our feet the PTC reps came around looking for $40,000 in back maintenance
in order to catch up to the current release.  I've since left but I think
they are using SolidWorks now :)

I hate to say it but whichever way you go you'll never be completely
satisfied.  Everything looks good on the surface but when you really
start getting into it you quickly uncover the ugly side
(*COUGH*camworks*COUGH*).

If you have more specific questions about ProE feel free to email me at
joel.moore AT prodevinc DOT com

Good luck,

Joel Moore



Quote:> For those of you who have used both Pro-E and Solidworks, which do you
> prefer, and why? Please, also tell me what you're designing. I do tool
> and die, and special machine design, and am trying to decide which of
> these two products to switch to. TIA

 
 
 

Deciding between Pro-E and Solidworks

Post by Stev » Thu, 05 Dec 2002 07:44:38



> For those of you who have used both Pro-E and Solidworks, which do you
> prefer, and why? Please, also tell me what you're designing. I do tool and
> die, and special machine design, and am trying to decide which of these two
> products to switch to. TIA

Depends on how much you want to spend, do you need advanced surfacing,
and what other requirements (tool path building, large assemblies) you
need.

A good choice for most  all around use is Solidworks.  Good modeling,
good assembly, low cost and lots of users.  Based on Unigraphic's
parasolid core solid modeling engine.  For machine design, this should
be fine.

For core and cavity mold work, I would use either Unigraphics or
Catia.  These are in the same ball park cost as Pro-E.

I don't like Pro-E due to single precision database and it wants
models to be parametrically made, no choice.  Pro_E is popular, is in
my opinion showing it's age, and too expensive.  Catia and Solidworks
are related, and Unigraphics owns SDRC, and in the end, size does
matter.

I've been around CAD/CAM for a long time, and in the end, any company
that has been around for 10+ years is a good choice.  It's not so much
the software, as all of them have their good and bad, but it's
ultimately the user's skill and understanding of the software that
matters.

 
 
 

Deciding between Pro-E and Solidworks

Post by oneSWen » Thu, 05 Dec 2002 07:56:42


Very well said Steve...I agree with all of your comments.  Although, I have
created some complex molds and cavities with SolidWorks too.  That is all
relative though.



Quote:> > For those of you who have used both Pro-E and Solidworks, which do you
> > prefer, and why? Please, also tell me what you're designing. I do tool
and
> > die, and special machine design, and am trying to decide which of these
two
> > products to switch to. TIA

> Depends on how much you want to spend, do you need advanced surfacing,
> and what other requirements (tool path building, large assemblies) you
> need.

> A good choice for most  all around use is Solidworks.  Good modeling,
> good assembly, low cost and lots of users.  Based on Unigraphic's
> parasolid core solid modeling engine.  For machine design, this should
> be fine.

> For core and cavity mold work, I would use either Unigraphics or
> Catia.  These are in the same ball park cost as Pro-E.

> I don't like Pro-E due to single precision database and it wants
> models to be parametrically made, no choice.  Pro_E is popular, is in
> my opinion showing it's age, and too expensive.  Catia and Solidworks
> are related, and Unigraphics owns SDRC, and in the end, size does
> matter.

> I've been around CAD/CAM for a long time, and in the end, any company
> that has been around for 10+ years is a good choice.  It's not so much
> the software, as all of them have their good and bad, but it's
> ultimately the user's skill and understanding of the software that
> matters.

 
 
 

Deciding between Pro-E and Solidworks

Post by Alex Sh » Thu, 05 Dec 2002 09:03:26



Quote:> For those of you who have used both Pro-E and Solidworks, which do you
> prefer, and why? Please, also tell me what you're designing. I do tool and
> die, and special machine design, and am trying to decide which of these
two
> products to switch to. TIA

Search the archive of this group on www.google.com. This topic has been
discussed so many times that you will find more than you will want to read.

I have expressed my personal opinion (in favor of Pro/E) in a discussion
that you can find if you do your Google search using 'The difference between
Pro/E2001 and Solidworks2001' as a keyword. It probably will not hurt to
also limit the time frame of your search to April 2002 (when this particular
discussion was happening on this NG).

I have actually done the search, but for some reason the message I sent
earlier with the link was removed from the NG. So you will have to do it
yourself. To my surprise, Google also shows that this discussion actually
spilled over
into the SolidWorks NG, so you might as well search there, too.

If you have a problem finding the stuff, let me know and I will find it and
send the link to you. I just don't think it's worth the time to rehash it
for everybody all over again.
--
Alex Shishkin

http://home1.gte.net/res025wf/index.htm