Windows PB4.0 or UNIX PB4.0?

Windows PB4.0 or UNIX PB4.0?

Post by Michael E. Ha » Sat, 12 Nov 1994 03:00:54



I have an application that currently runs on a UNIX box and is accessed
by 100+ users (spread across the country) who dial in on 14.4k buad modems.  
The application is
currently a character based application that we would like to convert
to Powerbuilder.  The database will need to continue to reside on the UNIX box.
The users need to continue to access the application from pc's across
14.4k modem connections.

My question is, does it make more sense to use the UNIX version of Powerbuilder
(when it becomes available) or the Windows version?  I suppose my question
boils down to : does it make more sense to send/receive database records
across a 14.4k modem connection for the Windows Powerbuilder Application
or use the PC's as X-terminals across a 14.4k modem connection into the
Unix Powerbuilder Application.

Does anyone have experience with either approach and perhaps have some
comments and/or advice.  Is perhaps Powerbuilder not suitable for this
environment.

Thanks,

Michael
--


h (303) 278-7722                                      ..!uunet!yonder!michael

 
 
 

Windows PB4.0 or UNIX PB4.0?

Post by Kenneth We » Sat, 12 Nov 1994 12:30:56



Quote:>I have an application that currently runs on a UNIX box and is accessed
>by 100+ users (spread across the country) who dial in on 14.4k buad modems.  
>The application is
>currently a character based application that we would like to convert
>to Powerbuilder.  The database will need to continue to reside on the UNIX box.
>The users need to continue to access the application from pc's across
>14.4k modem connections.

>My question is, does it make more sense to use the UNIX version of Powerbuilder
>(when it becomes available) or the Windows version?  I suppose my question
>boils down to : does it make more sense to send/receive database records
>across a 14.4k modem connection for the Windows Powerbuilder Application
>or use the PC's as X-terminals across a 14.4k modem connection into the
>Unix Powerbuilder Application.

X-sessions require large bandwidth. 14.4k is going to be very slow if you are
sending screen data (ie graphics) in addition to data and database commands.
I'd say the Windows option lets you take advantage of client/server and
reduces the load on your modem connection.

>Does anyone have experience with either approach and perhaps have some
>comments and/or advice.  Is perhaps Powerbuilder not suitable for this
>environment.

>Thanks,

>Michael
>--


>h (303) 278-7722                                      ..!uunet!yonder!michael

Ken Wer

--

 
 
 

Windows PB4.0 or UNIX PB4.0?

Post by Michael Parks Swa » Mon, 14 Nov 1994 17:38:22



Quote:>My question is, does it make more sense to use the UNIX version of Powerbuilder
>(when it becomes available) or the Windows version?  I suppose my question
>boils down to : does it make more sense to send/receive database records
>across a 14.4k modem connection for the Windows Powerbuilder Application
>or use the PC's as X-terminals across a 14.4k modem connection into the
>Unix Powerbuilder Application.

  My guess would be that running the PowerBuilder application locally would
be faster. If you ran PowerBuilder on the server, then each copy of the
application would be competing with the database for system resources
(CPU, disk, and memory). If you distribute the application, then the load
on your server is greatly reduced. Another problem with running the
application on the server is that X can generate a lot of network traffic,
with the resulting overhead. Each time a window is moved, resized, or
otherwise changed, the xterminal has to send that information to powerBuilder,
and PB has to tell it how to repaint it over a modem line. This isn't as
fast, and it uses a fair amount of CPU on both machines. If PB's only running
locally, then it only has to talk to the server to do retrieves, and send
updates, which will usually be a lot less traffic.
--

"I'm goin' to Win95. I'm goin' down, goin' down now. I'm goin' down, goin'
down now." - Pb Hindenburg