Correct usage of the words Login/Log in/Logon and User name/Username/User Name

Correct usage of the words Login/Log in/Logon and User name/Username/User Name

Post by SeshuKum » Fri, 20 Jun 2003 20:56:21



Hi All,
        I would like to know the correct usage of the word 'Login' or 'Log in'
        or 'Logon' used with respect to a Login page. It appears that there is
        no standard notation for this first page of any computer based
        application. Also please let me know which of the words is correct
        "User name" or "Username" or User Name".

Thanks in advance

 
 
 

Correct usage of the words Login/Log in/Logon and User name/Username/User Name

Post by Jonathan Sach » Sat, 21 Jun 2003 02:02:34



>    I would like to know the correct usage of the word 'Login' or 'Log in'
>    or 'Logon'...

I don't think there is any standard. Just be consistent.

My mail address is jsachs177 at earthlink dot net.

 
 
 

Correct usage of the words Login/Log in/Logon and User name/Username/User Name

Post by mccroha » Sat, 21 Jun 2003 05:52:47




>>        I would like to know the correct usage of the word 'Login' or 'Log in'
>>        or 'Logon'...
>I don't think there is any standard. Just be consistent.

Agreed. But for what it's worth, I tend to use:

Login - adjective, as in: 'The first thing you will see will be the login screen.'
Log in - verb, as in: 'You will need to log in before using the system.'
User name - noun. The real name of the person using the system. Infrequent. More commonly called "user's name" or just "name".
Username - noun. The name or ID by which the system knows the user.

As Jonathan said, however, this is really one of those cases where it's less important WHAT you do than that you simply do it consistently.

--S

 
 
 

Correct usage of the words Login/Log in/Logon and User name/Username/User Name

Post by SeshuKum » Sat, 21 Jun 2003 19:44:59





> >>   I would like to know the correct usage of the word 'Login' or 'Log in'
> >>   or 'Logon'...

> >I don't think there is any standard. Just be consistent.

> Agreed. But for what it's worth, I tend to use:

> Login - adjective, as in: 'The first thing you will see will be the login screen.'
> Log in - verb, as in: 'You will need to log in before using the system.'
> User name - noun. The real name of the person using the system. Infrequent. More commonly called "user's name" or just "name".
> Username - noun. The name or ID by which the system knows the user.

> As Jonathan said, however, this is really one of those cases where it's less important WHAT you do than that you simply do it consistently.

> --S

Would it not be nice to have a consistent usage of words so that the
message is properly and easily understood by all.Reading should be
easy and pleasent. Using word(s) should not pull more energy than what
is required.
 
 
 

Correct usage of the words Login/Log in/Logon and User name/Username/User Name

Post by Bradley K. Sherm » Sat, 21 Jun 2003 21:19:24




>Would it not be nice to have a consistent usage of words so that the
>message is properly and easily understood by all.Reading should be
>easy and pleasent. Using word(s) should not pull more energy than what
>is required.

By the same token, one might ask for two spaces after each period,
correct spelling and the elimination of superfluous parentheses.

    --bks

 
 
 

Correct usage of the words Login/Log in/Logon and User name/Username/User Name

Post by mccroha » Sat, 21 Jun 2003 22:30:58



>Would it not be nice to have a consistent usage of words so that the
>message is properly and easily understood by all.Reading should be
>easy and pleasent. Using word(s) should not pull more energy than what
>is required.

Oh, certainly. In general, I think standards are a good thing, at least
in those areas where variation doesn't serve any useful purpose. The
difficulty is that there's no established standard for this topic, and
no one is really in a position to impose one. Like so many other
things, a consensus emerges over time.

--S

 
 
 

Correct usage of the words Login/Log in/Logon and User name/Username/User Name

Post by Calum Benso » Mon, 23 Jun 2003 21:50:20



Quote:> Oh, certainly. In general, I think standards are a good thing, at least
> in those areas where variation doesn't serve any useful purpose. The
> difficulty is that there's no established standard for this topic

The Microsoft Manual of Style for Technical Publications is probably about
the most established one (just because of the pervasiveness of MS Windows);
don't know if it's available online but the glossary in the GNOME
documentation styleguide is largely based on it IIRC:
http://developer.gnome.org/documents/style-guide/wordlist.html

Cheeri,
Calum.

--
Calum Benson, Made in Scotland from Girders
(Reverse email address to reply)

 
 
 

Correct usage of the words Login/Log in/Logon and User name/Username/User Name

Post by Terry Simpso » Mon, 30 Jun 2003 06:59:34



>The Microsoft Manual of Style for Technical Publications
[...]
>don't know if it's available online

It can be downloaded without charge from:
www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=B494...
3F-46B0-B12F-39C8E870517A

The relevant section reads:
********************************************
log on to, log off from, logon (adj)
Use log on to to refer to connecting to a network and log off from (or
simply log off) to refer to disconnecting from a network. Do not use log in,
login, log onto, log off of, logout, sign off, or sign on. An exception is
when other terms are dictated by the interface.

Use logon only as an adjective, as in "logon password," not as a noun.

Correct
You are prompted for your password while logging on.
Reconnect when you log on to the network.
Some networks support this logon feature.
Remember to log off from the network.

Incorrect
You are prompted for your password during logon.
Log in before you start Windows.
Remember to log off of the network.
********************************************

At least some versions of Microsoft Windows appear to follow this style.

Quote:>but the glossary in the GNOME
>documentation styleguide is largely based on it IIRC:
>http://developer.gnome.org/documents/style-guide/wordlist.html

However,that reference reads:
********************************************
log in (verb)
Definition: To supply a username and password to gain access to a session.
Usage: Normal text rules.
Tags: Prose tag rules.
Example: You can select to display a splash screen when you log in.
Note 1: You log in to a session, not your workstation, system, or workspace.
Note 2: Use log in rather than log on.

login (noun, adjective)
Definition: The process of gaining access to a session.
Usage: Normal text rules.
Tags: Prose tag rules.
Example 1: (noun) Select this option to display a splash screen on login.
Example 2: (adjective) The Options menu lists your login options.

log out (verb)
Definition: To terminate a session.
Usage: Normal text rules.
Tags: Prose tag rules.
Example: To log out of your session or shut down your system, click on the
Log Out button.
Note 1: You log out of a session, not your workstation, system, or
workspace.
Note 2: Use log out rather than log off.

logout (noun, adjective)
Definition: The process of terminating a session.
Usage: Normal text rules.
Tags: Prose tag rules.
Example 1: (noun) Select this option to display a confirmation dialog on
logout.
Example 2: (adjective) Use the Sessions preference tool to specify logout
behavior.
********************************************

As far as 'user name' and 'username' are concerned, you will have to look up
what it says for yourself. However, I would say that this question has a
fairly logical answer. The 'username' and the 'user name' are two different
things. Most systems (e.g. email) need a 'username' to ensure that identity
is unique. It is essentially a technical requirement. The 'user name' is a
text label that makes the system more human. It need not exist, and if it
does, it need not be unique. John Doe can be the 'user name' for many users
but only one of them has the 'username' johndoe19.

Quote:> Calum Benson, Made in Scotland from Girders

Thanks very much for pointing out the good sources. The subtle Irn Bru
reference made me smile too.