Now these are batteries

Now these are batteries

Post by Jim Abe » Thu, 26 Nov 1998 04:00:00



The DRMS is auctioning off a complete set of submarine batteries.

There are 134 batteries weighing 2100 pounds each (37x32x37). They
originally cost the US Gov $515,840 and they will probably go for
considerably less than the value of the raw lead inside them ($50k or so).
Of course they're in Jacksonville, FL and it might be expensive to comply
with DOT regulations for transporting 150 tons of batteries full of acid to
your Y2K bunker.

Just imagine, though. You could charge up from the grid and probably run a
house for months.

:-)

Jim Abel
--
http://www.glitchproof.com  Keep yourself and your family safe.
Store a few necessities now. It's cheap insurance in case things get bad.

 
 
 

Now these are batteries

Post by Jim Janec » Thu, 26 Nov 1998 04:00:00




> The DRMS is auctioning off a complete set of submarine batteries.

> There are 134 batteries weighing 2100 pounds each (37x32x37). They

These are usually single-cell batteries as well.
so to get 12vdc you need at least 6 of them, that 6 tons+ of batteries.

 
 
 

Now these are batteries

Post by John Hasca » Thu, 26 Nov 1998 04:00:00



}Pardon my ignorance, but where does this calculation come from? Why would a
}2ton battery only yield 2vdc.
}---JRE---

   It yields 2V at a boat-load :) of amps!

   Pop the hood on your car, look carefully and you will
   see that your battery is really 6 cells, each producing
   approximately 2 volts).   The sub batteries are just
   wired in series externally rather than internally
   (most likely so one dead cell doesn't junk N good
   ones).

John




}>
}>> The DRMS is auctioning off a complete set of submarine batteries.
}>>
}>> There are 134 batteries weighing 2100 pounds each (37x32x37). They
}>
}>
}>These are usually single-cell batteries as well.
}>so to get 12vdc you need at least 6 of them, that 6 tons+ of batteries.
}
}

--
John Hascall, Software Engr.      Shut up, be happy.  The conveniences you
ISU Computation Center            demanded are now mandatory. -Jello Biafra

http://www.cc.iastate.edu/staff/systems/john/index.html  <=- the usual crud
 
 
 

Now these are batteries

Post by NoOneYouKno » Thu, 26 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Pardon my ignorance, but where does this calculation come from? Why would a
2ton battery only yield 2vdc.

---JRE---




>> The DRMS is auctioning off a complete set of submarine batteries.

>> There are 134 batteries weighing 2100 pounds each (37x32x37). They

>These are usually single-cell batteries as well.
>so to get 12vdc you need at least 6 of them, that 6 tons+ of batteries.

 
 
 

Now these are batteries

Post by Maren Purve » Thu, 26 Nov 1998 04:00:00





> > The DRMS is auctioning off a complete set of submarine batteries.

> > There are 134 batteries weighing 2100 pounds each (37x32x37). They

> These are usually single-cell batteries as well.
> so to get 12vdc you need at least 6 of them, that 6 tons+ of batteries.

so you put them in your back yard and cover them with a blue tarp.

Maren
(And hope that there is no lava tube that collapses under the weight)

 
 
 

Now these are batteries

Post by NoOneYouKno » Thu, 26 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Ah, I see.

Am I safe in assuming that this is a function of the chemicals and plate
material used (e.g. lead/acid)?

---JRE---



>}Pardon my ignorance, but where does this calculation come from? Why would
a
>}2ton battery only yield 2vdc.
>}---JRE---

>   It yields 2V at a boat-load :) of amps!

>   Pop the hood on your car, look carefully and you will
>   see that your battery is really 6 cells, each producing
>   approximately 2 volts).   The sub batteries are just
>   wired in series externally rather than internally
>   (most likely so one dead cell doesn't junk N good
>   ones).

>John




>}>
>}>> The DRMS is auctioning off a complete set of submarine batteries.
>}>>
>}>> There are 134 batteries weighing 2100 pounds each (37x32x37). They
>}>
>}>
>}>These are usually single-cell batteries as well.
>}>so to get 12vdc you need at least 6 of them, that 6 tons+ of batteries.
>}
>}

>--
>John Hascall, Software Engr.      Shut up, be happy.  The conveniences you
>ISU Computation Center            demanded are now mandatory. -Jello Biafra

>http://www.cc.iastate.edu/staff/systems/john/index.html  <=- the usual crud

 
 
 

Now these are batteries

Post by Jim Janec » Thu, 26 Nov 1998 04:00:00




> Ah, I see.

> Am I safe in assuming that this is a function of the chemicals and plate
> material used (e.g. lead/acid)?

> ---JRE---

(quotes of all previous discussion snipped because it got really confusing)

is WHAT a function of the chemicals and plate material?

the weight?
the possibility of a bad cell?
the voltage?
external linkage as opposed to internal linkage?

 
 
 

Now these are batteries

Post by Frank N » Fri, 27 Nov 1998 04:00:00


On Wed, 25 Nov 1998 07:00:08 GMT, an orbiting mind control laser caused "Jim

Quote:>The DRMS is auctioning off a complete set of submarine batteries.

Defense Readiness Materiel Section?

Quote:>There are 134 batteries weighing 2100 pounds each (37x32x37).

I presume that's in inches.

Quote:>They
>originally cost the US Gov $515,840 and they will probably go for
>considerably less than the value of the raw lead inside them ($50k or so).
>Of course they're in Jacksonville, FL and it might be expensive to comply
>with DOT regulations for transporting 150 tons of batteries full of acid to
>your Y2K bunker.

Drain the acid, ship damp, buy new acid at destination.  Shipping a few at a
time is not going to effect anyone because you're under the DOT limit.

Quote:>Just imagine, though. You could charge up from the grid and probably run a
>house for months.

I take it that it is being sold as one lot.

Anyone want to split the lot?  I could take about ten of them...

Too bad they're not selling the charging/conditioning circuits as well...

Hmmm.  What's the voltage/ampereage rating on one of them things, anyway?  

Mike?

Frank Ney  WV/EMT-B  N4ZHG  LPWV  NRA(L) GOA CCRKBA JPFO
Sponsor, BATF Abuse page  http://www.veryComputer.com/~croaker/batfabus.html
West *ia Coordinator, Libertarian Second Amendment Caucus
Fan Guest of Honor, Technicon 16  http://www.veryComputer.com/
- --
"Pinky, are you pondering what I'm pondering?"
"Uhh, I think so, Brain, but how are we going to get all of the computers to
fail all at the same time?"

 
 
 

Now these are batteries

Post by SAG » Fri, 27 Nov 1998 04:00:00



> Ah, I see.

> Am I safe in assuming that this is a function of the chemicals and plate
> material used (e.g. lead/acid)?

Yes.  The lead-acid battery uses one plate of metallic lead, another of
lead oxide, and sulphuric acid electrolyte.

Pb + PbO2 + 2H+ 2HSO4 <=> 2PbSO4 + 2H2O + 2e-

Chemistry determines plate potential (volts) -- batteries employing
different chemistry (nickel/cadmium or carbon/zinc, for example) yield
different potential.

The battery "size" determines how much energy (Joules, watt-hours) can
be stored.

HTH,

SAG

 
 
 

Now these are batteries

Post by Jim Abe » Fri, 27 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Quote:Frank Ney wrote...
>I take it that it is being sold as one lot.

Yup. DRMS Sale 31-9010, Lot 41, contact Douglas A. Bailey (904) 772-7417 x
40

Quote:>Anyone want to split the lot?  I could take about ten of them...

The lead in them is worth about $375 each. They will probably go for
somewhat less, so a bid of $200 each might snag them. Then there's the cost
of draining them, disposing of the acid, transporting them and adding new
acid. It would take 4 semi trucks to haul these puppies and we're probably
talking about over a thousand gallons of acid to be disposed of/replaced.

Nevertheless, if somebody local (Jacksonville, FL) organized the whole
shebang and the secondary costs were locked down I'd take a flyer on 6 or 12
of them.

Quote:>Hmmm.  What's the voltage/ampereage rating on one of them things, anyway?

They're 2 volt cells. I couldn't find the exact spec, but similar (smaller,
1500lbs each) batteries used in the SeaWolf Sub have a capacity of 6525
amp/hours per cell. Six of those cells would hold 470kwh of electricity (I
think).

Wow.

Jim Abel
--
http://www.glitchproof.com  Keep yourself and your family safe.
Store a few necessities now. It's cheap insurance in case things get bad.

 
 
 

Now these are batteries

Post by Jim Janec » Fri, 27 Nov 1998 04:00:00




Quote:> Drain the acid, ship damp, buy new acid at destination.  Shipping a few at a
> time is not going to effect anyone because you're under the DOT limit.

A:  if the batteries have not been used yet, the acid may be in a separate
container already (or possibly not even available at the auction)
this would be good.

B:  if the batteries contain the acid, how long have they been sitting,
how sulfated are the plates?
this would not be so good

C:  if you drain the acid from the batteries, you effectively ruin the
battery, unless you can figure out some way to fill the void with
something inert, like nitrogen.
this would be a major drag.  

If the plates are exposed to atmosphere and they have a thin layer of acid
on them, they get oxidized or really heavily sulphated or ...something,
there was a thread on this in alt.energy.renewable  awhile back, I'll see
if I can dredge it up and find the guy who explained this

-jim

 
 
 

Now these are batteries

Post by Jim Abe » Sat, 28 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Quote:Jim Janecek wrote...
>A:  if the batteries have not been used yet...

They are not listed as unused, so they have probably been rotated off of a
sub after several years of use. I have no clue whether they rotate them when
they begin to show signs of wearing out or according to a fixed  schedule
even if the sub never left the dock while they were installed. Since we are
talking about the DOD, I would guess the latter.

They will probably be bought by one of the large battery reclaiming
concerns. The easiest way to get a few might be to offer something close to
the reclamation value to have them dropped off on the way to the recycling
plant. I'm going to make a few calls next week and see what's involved.

Jim Abel
--
http://www.glitchproof.com  Keep yourself and your family safe.
Store a few necessities now. It's cheap insurance in case things get bad.

 
 
 

Now these are batteries

Post by NoOneYouKno » Tue, 01 Dec 1998 04:00:00




>> Ah, I see.

>> Am I safe in assuming that this is a function of the chemicals and plate
>> material used (e.g. lead/acid)?

>Yes.  The lead-acid battery uses one plate of metallic lead, another of
>lead oxide, and sulphuric acid electrolyte.

>Pb + PbO2 + 2H+ 2HSO4 <=> 2PbSO4 + 2H2O + 2e-

>Chemistry determines plate potential (volts) -- batteries employing
>different chemistry (nickel/cadmium or carbon/zinc, for example) yield
>different potential.

>The battery "size" determines how much energy (Joules, watt-hours) can
>be stored.

Interesting info. I never paid much attention to battery chemistry.

Wow, the information you can learn in a Y2K group is amazing.

---JRE---

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

>HTH,

>SAG

 
 
 

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