Why NOT learn vi?

Why NOT learn vi?

Post by Sebastiano Barbier » Thu, 18 Jun 1998 04:00:00





> >Would anyone like to give me good reasons why I must learn vi?

  I believe it strongly depends on what are your needs (and the environment
  you work on). The only reasons to learn vi (or just the essential commands
  of it) are that :  (a) is bundled with any Unix system  (b) some system
  administration utilities rely on that (if you are doing something in
  single user mode, you're likely to have only "vi", or even "ed").

  But for normal work, you would not need vi as an editor (although you
  most like need an editor).

     - if you are a secretary, what you'd need is a word processor, not
       an editor (same if you fall in the categories below, but when
       you need to write documents)

     - if you are an occasional user, you'd need a simple editor. A good
       choice is pico (if you use the editor mostly to compose mail, you
       can use pine as mail agent, who has pico as imbedded editor)
       Fine for simple plain ascii files.

     - if you are a programmer, and have the opportunity to have a
       workstation console or X-terminal (an X display) of your own,
       probably your OS or windowing environment provide a window oriented
       GUI driven editor (e.g. dxnotepad on Ultrix and DU, textedit on
       SunOS and Solaris Openwindows, dtpad on all CDE window systems ....)

     - if you are coming from a "mainframe" environment and like the old
       good editor like IBM XEDIT or VMS EDT or EVE, you'd find around
       clones of them, either commercial or free, check the FAQ of this NG
       and the "editor compendium"
       http://www.bsyse.wsu.edu/~rnelson/editors/editors.htm

*** flame retardant underwear on

Quote:> When I first started using vi (1989), I hated it.  I use to use vi on

  I still hate it (1990-1998)

Quote:> After a few weeks, you'll be escaping and using 'cw', dd, c$, '~'

  Don't have weeks to waste coercing my fingers and brain to go the modal
  mode of vi

Quote:> to move text between them.  My first two years of using vi would
> have been a lot easier if I had known about this feature.

  Two years learning curve, great ! (Blaming vi, not you or me)

*** all underwear off

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Why NOT learn vi?

Post by Jason Kolosei » Thu, 18 Jun 1998 04:00:00


On Wed, 17 Jun 1998 10:14:46 +0200, Sebastiano Barbieri



stuff deleted

>> to move text between them.  My first two years of using vi would
>> have been a lot easier if I had known about this feature.

>  Two years learning curve, great ! (Blaming vi, not you or me)

The learning curve wasn't two years.  The reason it took two years
to discover this was due to the fact that I hadn't RTFM.

Jason Koloseike

Any opinions are my own and do not in any way reflect the opinions of my employer.

 
 
 

Why NOT learn vi?

Post by William Le » Thu, 18 Jun 1998 04:00:00


[Other info snipped]
    I basically agree with you on the different needs.  I don't really see a
secretary wanting to learn how to code in Vi.

Quote:>*** flame retardant underwear on

>> When I first started using vi (1989), I hated it.  I use to use vi on

>  I still hate it (1990-1998)

    I hated vi for a month in 1993, had to use it (because of emacs'
weirdness on VT100 terminals) after that month, loved Emacs, then XEmacs,
and found the ultimate editor, VIM. (Vi Improved).

Quote:

>> After a few weeks, you'll be escaping and using 'cw', dd, c$, '~'

>  Don't have weeks to waste coercing my fingers and brain to go the modal
>  mode of vi

    I can tell you from my experience it's worth every single minute of my
time learning Vi.  Emacs and XEmacs are really cool editors too, but they
are too big and they make my left hand hurt aftering constantly holding down
the Ctrl key for a long time (I move in Emacs with Ctrl-n and Ctrl-p).  Now
in Vim, I don'thave that problem anymore.  It does what I want to do and it
does it very, very well.
    You may spend 10 times longer trying to learn Vi (well, try out Vim,
it's really much improved...:), but the editor is at least 10 times better
than other editors (or 100 times better than notepad in that sense).  You
can decide for yourself.

Quote:>> to move text between them.  My first two years of using vi would
>> have been a lot easier if I had known about this feature.

>  Two years learning curve, great ! (Blaming vi, not you or me)

    There are plenty of tutorials out there.  If you want more info on Vim
you can visit http://www.vim.org.  They have links to several nice tutorials
for vi and vim.  Some of them are even designed for beginners.

Quote:>*** all underwear off

Will