.NET as a standard (Brian, what about .NET for Linux?)

.NET as a standard (Brian, what about .NET for Linux?)

Post by Sori » Sat, 02 Nov 2002 05:20:49



* .NET CLR, C# SET TO BE STANDARDIZED
   A working group within the International Organization for
Standardization (ISO) has reviewed Microsoft's C# programming language
and .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR), which likely will be approved
as open standards by January 2003. The ECMA had already declared C#
and the CLR as standards in late 2001, and with ISO certification in
the works, we'll start seeing third-party C# compilers and
implementations of the .NET environment that run on Linux and other
non-Microsoft platforms.
http://www.wininformant.com/articles/index.cfm?articleid=27104

--
Sorin

 
 
 

.NET as a standard (Brian, what about .NET for Linux?)

Post by Sori » Sat, 02 Nov 2002 05:25:47


   ==== COMMENTARY ====

* .NET COMES IN THROUGH THE OUT DOOR
   When Microsoft announced its grand scheme for .NET 2 years ago, the
company promised an interconnected future that would benefit
developers, businesses, and consumers. But as I've often noted in .NET
UPDATE, Microsoft's promises haven't produced anything concrete in
those 2 years. Indeed, many of the grandest high-profile .NET
plans--such as the aborted .NET My Services (formerly code-named
HailStorm) project--have been unmitigated disasters.

During the past few months, however, Microsoft has seen the turnaround
it's needed to keep interest and momentum in .NET going.
Interestingly, this turnaround has affected each of the company's core
markets. Here's how.

Developers
   Visual Studio .NET shipped in February 2001, giving developers the
tools they need to create .NET-based applications, Web applications,
and servers. Development shops have been working with Visual Studio
.NET, and the results are just now beginning to hit the market. The
first such applications and services, of course, will arrive from
companies that still operate on Internet time or require data
interoperability between disparate systems over the Web.

"We're using .NET to write the new inventory automation and management
systems for our data center and a complete rewrite of an e-commerce
solution we offer our customers," reports Brian Laird, senior
application developer at DataPipe, a New York-area company that offers
managed Web and application-hosting services. "It's a truly object-
oriented environment with excellent code reuse and a full-featured
class library that offers services like garbage collection and memory
management. We're using C# exclusively on all of our current projects,
running under the .NET Framework. Our code needs to evolve as quickly
as the technology changes, and .NET lets us roll out code more quickly
and then update it again in the future without requiring major
rewrites."

Developer acceptance of .NET technologies will probably be further
aided by news that various standards organizations such as the
International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and ECMA are
ratifying C# and the .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR) as
international standards. Furthermore, .NET is already Microsoft's most
interoperable set of technologies, with support for XML and Simple
Object Access Protocol (SOAP).

Businesses
   Left behind after the HailStorm fiasco of 2002, Microsoft's
enterprise customers will have a lot of .NET technology to chew on in
the coming months. First up is the newest Office version. Office 11
will offer extensive XML support and a new XML-based front end
code-named XDocs, which I discussed in the October 17 issue of .NET
UPDATE. XDocs could be Office 11's killer application because it can
seamlessly tie together any number of back-end data stores with a
familiar-looking Office-like front-end application. Historically,
ease-of-use such as XDocs will deliver has been among Microsoft's
strong suits.

On the server end, many .NET Enterprise servers that will introduce
compelling new features are coming down the pike. An as-yet-unnamed
Real-Time Communications (RTC) server, for example, uses the Session
Initiation Protocol (SIP) that first debuted in Windows Messenger
(part of Windows XP) to add enterprise Instant Messaging (IM)
capabilities to Windows .NET Server (Win.NET Server) 2003. And the new
Microsoft Exchange Server version, code-named Titanium, will use .NET
technologies to bridge the gulf between email and personal information
manager (PIM) data stored on the server and new mobile devices such as
wireless laptops, Pocket PCs, and smart phones.

Consumers
   From a qualitative standpoint, when it comes to .NET and Web
services, consumers have been the big winners. XP ushered in the era
of .NET Alerts, and the new MSN 8 Internet access service lets
consumers take advantage of alerts in new ways. In addition to
receiving alerts regarding news, stock quotes, travel conditions, and
other information, MSN 8 customers can now send themselves alerts
about pending appointments they've scheduled in MSN Calendar. You can
even have alerts forwarded to your cell phone.

.NET has also enabled new peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing capabilities
in applications such as Windows Messenger and MSN Messenger; anywhere,
anytime email access with MSN Hotmail; and, in an interesting twist on
the .NET Passport location features, a way to find rival game players
online, then invite them into game tournaments. When I installed a
trial copy of Microsoft Links 2002, a golf game, the installation
added options to Windows Messenger to let me find and issue an
invitation to other players. Nice.

I could list more examples of cool .NET technologies, but the point
I'm making is that these technologies are finally being applied in the
real world, and some of the applications of those technologies are
pretty exciting. After a dry summer, when I often wondered whether
.NET had any legs, it's nice to see Microsoft--and, increasingly,
other companies--creating innovative .NET solutions.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


  * .NET CLR, C# SET TO BE STANDARDIZED
     A working group within the International Organization for
  Standardization (ISO) has reviewed Microsoft's C# programming language
  and .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR), which likely will be approved
  as open standards by January 2003. The ECMA had already declared C#
  and the CLR as standards in late 2001, and with ISO certification in
  the works, we'll start seeing third-party C# compilers and
  implementations of the .NET environment that run on Linux and other
  non-Microsoft platforms.
  http://www.wininformant.com/articles/index.cfm?articleid=27104

  --
  Sorin

 
 
 

.NET as a standard (Brian, what about .NET for Linux?)

Post by Bria » Sat, 02 Nov 2002 06:11:27


Hey Sorin:

What is .NET?

Bwahahahahahahahaha...

Thanks for pimping the latest in Microsoft .NET vapourware.

Incidently, the most interesting news of late is that Yahoo, one of the most
popular independant web portals, is switching to PHP for all it's active web
programming.

I am certain you have never heard of PHP because it isn't Microsoft - PHP is
a powerful open source scripting language for active web development. It is
also the most popular scripting language surpassing anything Microsoft has
developed, including .NET (whatever that is).

By the way, what is .NET?

Bwahahahahahahaha...

That never gets old.

8^)

Best regards,

Brian
Linux Mystic
open sorcerer

 
 
 

.NET as a standard (Brian, what about .NET for Linux?)

Post by Jack D. Russell, Sr » Sat, 02 Nov 2002 08:12:38



>    ==== COMMENTARY ====

> * .NET COMES IN THROUGH THE OUT DOOR
>    When Microsoft announced its grand scheme for .NET 2 years ago, the
> company promised an interconnected future that would benefit
> developers, businesses, and consumers. But as I've often noted in .NET
> UPDATE, Microsoft's promises haven't produced anything concrete in
> those 2 years. Indeed, many of the grandest high-profile .NET
> plans--such as the aborted .NET My Services (formerly code-named
> HailStorm) project--have been unmitigated disasters.

> During the past few months, however, Microsoft has seen the turnaround
> it's needed to keep interest and momentum in .NET going.
> Interestingly, this turnaround has affected each of the company's core
> markets. Here's how.

> Developers
>    Visual Studio .NET shipped in February 2001, giving developers the
> tools they need to create .NET-based applications, Web applications,
> and servers. Development shops have been working with Visual Studio
> .NET, and the results are just now beginning to hit the market. The
> first such applications and services, of course, will arrive from
> companies that still operate on Internet time or require data
> interoperability between disparate systems over the Web.

> "We're using .NET to write the new inventory automation and management
> systems for our data center and a complete rewrite of an e-commerce
> solution we offer our customers," reports Brian Laird, senior
> application developer at DataPipe, a New York-area company that offers
> managed Web and application-hosting services. "It's a truly object-
> oriented environment with excellent code reuse and a full-featured
> class library that offers services like garbage collection and memory
> management. We're using C# exclusively on all of our current projects,
> running under the .NET Framework. Our code needs to evolve as quickly
> as the technology changes, and .NET lets us roll out code more quickly
> and then update it again in the future without requiring major
> rewrites."

> Developer acceptance of .NET technologies will probably be further
> aided by news that various standards organizations such as the
> International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and ECMA are
> ratifying C# and the .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR) as
> international standards. Furthermore, .NET is already Microsoft's most
> interoperable set of technologies, with support for XML and Simple
> Object Access Protocol (SOAP).

> Businesses
>    Left behind after the HailStorm fiasco of 2002, Microsoft's
> enterprise customers will have a lot of .NET technology to chew on in
> the coming months. First up is the newest Office version. Office 11
> will offer extensive XML support and a new XML-based front end
> code-named XDocs, which I discussed in the October 17 issue of .NET
> UPDATE. XDocs could be Office 11's killer application because it can
> seamlessly tie together any number of back-end data stores with a
> familiar-looking Office-like front-end application. Historically,
> ease-of-use such as XDocs will deliver has been among Microsoft's
> strong suits.

> On the server end, many .NET Enterprise servers that will introduce
> compelling new features are coming down the pike. An as-yet-unnamed
> Real-Time Communications (RTC) server, for example, uses the Session
> Initiation Protocol (SIP) that first debuted in Windows Messenger
> (part of Windows XP) to add enterprise Instant Messaging (IM)
> capabilities to Windows .NET Server (Win.NET Server) 2003. And the new
> Microsoft Exchange Server version, code-named Titanium, will use .NET
> technologies to bridge the gulf between email and personal information
> manager (PIM) data stored on the server and new mobile devices such as
> wireless laptops, Pocket PCs, and smart phones.

> Consumers
>    From a qualitative standpoint, when it comes to .NET and Web
> services, consumers have been the big winners. XP ushered in the era
> of .NET Alerts, and the new MSN 8 Internet access service lets
> consumers take advantage of alerts in new ways. In addition to
> receiving alerts regarding news, stock quotes, travel conditions, and
> other information, MSN 8 customers can now send themselves alerts
> about pending appointments they've scheduled in MSN Calendar. You can
> even have alerts forwarded to your cell phone.

> .NET has also enabled new peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing capabilities
> in applications such as Windows Messenger and MSN Messenger; anywhere,
> anytime email access with MSN Hotmail; and, in an interesting twist on
> the .NET Passport location features, a way to find rival game players
> online, then invite them into game tournaments. When I installed a
> trial copy of Microsoft Links 2002, a golf game, the installation
> added options to Windows Messenger to let me find and issue an
> invitation to other players. Nice.

> I could list more examples of cool .NET technologies, but the point
> I'm making is that these technologies are finally being applied in the
> real world, and some of the applications of those technologies are
> pretty exciting. After a dry summer, when I often wondered whether
> .NET had any legs, it's nice to see Microsoft--and, increasingly,
> other companies--creating innovative .NET solutions.
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



>   * .NET CLR, C# SET TO BE STANDARDIZED
>      A working group within the International Organization for
>   Standardization (ISO) has reviewed Microsoft's C# programming language
>   and .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR), which likely will be approved
>   as open standards by January 2003. The ECMA had already declared C#
>   and the CLR as standards in late 2001, and with ISO certification in
>   the works, we'll start seeing third-party C# compilers and
>   implementations of the .NET environment that run on Linux and other
>   non-Microsoft platforms.
>   http://www.wininformant.com/articles/index.cfm?articleid=27104

>   --
>   Sorin

Paul..??? Paul.....<Looks all around> Paul..???

--
J. Dennis Russell, Sr.
Microsoft MVP
Please note:
Sandi Hardmeier/Nemesis and Zane Thomas/Sum One are *real* Microsoft MVPs.
To reply via e-mail, replace $$ with ss and replace notmail.com
with hotmail.com

 
 
 

.NET as a standard (Brian, what about .NET for Linux?)

Post by Val - Microsoft [.NOT MVP » Sat, 02 Nov 2002 08:48:43


jdrs,

probably not paul, (hey, that sounds like a good name for the next incarnation of msn - imagine the streets of NY peppered with "pnp" stickers),

but, as the old saying goes:
"a shill by any other name would smell........" (or was it),
"a wannabee by any name will stoop to......" (or was it),

whatever.....

Apparently the sorin and sandy dog and pony show will continue until they have each reached their "post count" quotas.

Expect an unending barrage of drivel, "oh let me add another thought", "please see MY website for a non-answer that's better than nothing", or "look here....cause when you do I get brownie points from my sponsor nemesis", or...or...or



  >    ==== COMMENTARY ====

  J. Dennis Russell, Sr.
  Microsoft MVP
  Please note:
  Sandi Hardmeier/Nemesis and Zane Thomas/Sum One are *real* Microsoft MVPs.
  To reply via e-mail, replace $$ with ss and replace notmail.com
  with hotmail.com

 
 
 

.NET as a standard (Brian, what about .NET for Linux?)

Post by Jack D. Russell, Sr » Sat, 02 Nov 2002 09:36:38




> jdrs,

> probably not paul, (hey, that sounds like a good name for the next
> incarnation of msn - imagine the streets of NY peppered with "pnp"
> stickers),  

> but, as the old saying goes:
> "a shill by any other name would smell........" (or was it),
> "a wannabee by any name will stoop to......" (or was it),

> whatever.....

> Apparently the sorin and sandy dog and pony show will continue until they
> have each reached their "post count" quotas.

> Expect an unending barrage of drivel, "oh let me add another thought",
> "please see MY website for a non-answer that's better than nothing", or
> "look here....cause when you do I get brownie points from my sponsor
> nemesis", or...or...or  




>   >    ==== COMMENTARY ====

>   J. Dennis Russell, Sr.
>   Microsoft MVP
>   Please note:
>   Sandi Hardmeier/Nemesis and Zane Thomas/Sum One are *real* Microsoft
> MVPs.
>   To reply via e-mail, replace $$ with ss and replace notmail.com
>   with hotmail.com

:)

--
J. Dennis Russell, Sr.
Microsoft MVP
Please note:
Sandi Hardmeier/Nemesis and Zane Thomas/Sum One are *real* Microsoft MVPs.
To reply via e-mail, replace $$ with ss and replace notmail.com
with hotmail.com

 
 
 

.NET as a standard (Brian, what about .NET for Linux?)

Post by Sori » Sat, 02 Nov 2002 18:18:44



> Hey Sorin:


> What is .NET?

> Bwahahahahahahahaha...

> Thanks for pimping the latest in Microsoft .NET vapourware.

> Incidently, the most interesting news of late is that Yahoo, one of the
most
> popular independant web portals, is switching to PHP for all it's active
web
> programming.

> I am certain you have never heard of PHP because it isn't Microsoft - PHP
is
> a powerful open source scripting language for active web development. It
is
> also the most popular scripting language surpassing anything Microsoft has
> developed, including .NET (whatever that is).

I know exactly what <?php> is and what are its $advantages over ASP.NET :-)
I worked on some site using PHP and Linux some years ago. That time PHP was
better than ASP (acknowledged). Using MySql (pg_exec($db,"select ...") it
was just good enough. But ASP .NET is better.

Quote:

> By the way, what is .NET?

http://www.microsoft.com/net - the question you asked is explained very
well. Also do a quick search on Google (Google also has a free .NET XML Web
Service API you can call from your applications, licenced for 1000 searches
a day if I remember the number correctly!)

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> Bwahahahahahahaha...

> That never gets old.

> 8^)

> Best regards,

> Brian
> Linux Mystic
> open sorcerer

 
 
 

.NET as a standard (Brian, what about .NET for Linux?)

Post by Bria » Sun, 03 Nov 2002 07:25:18


Hi Sorin:



> > I am certain you have never heard of PHP because it isn't
> > Microsoft - PHP is a powerful open source scripting language
> > for active web development. It is also the most popular
> > scripting language surpassing anything Microsoft has
> > developed, including .NET (whatever that is).
> I know exactly what <?php> is and what are its $advantages
> over ASP.NET :-) I worked on some site using PHP and Linux
> some years ago. That time PHP was better than ASP
> (acknowledged).

Still is.

Quote:> Using MySql (pg_exec($db,"select ...") it was just good enough.

Try PostgreSQL if MySQL is JUST good enough.

Quote:> But ASP .NET is better.

No it isn't better.

ASP .NET is inferior to PHP.

You know how I know? Because Microsoft prohibits the publication of any
comparisons with .NET - Could it be .NET is a dog that will not hunt?

Further, ASP .NET is locked into the Windows operating system and is
controlled by a convicted corporate predator and thug! PHP will run on
multiple OSes and platforms, including Windows.

Why lock myself into an inferior server platform (Windows) running inferior
bug-infested insecure server applications (IIS) that charges massive licence
fees for substandard performance?

8^)

And the clear winner is "Linux, Apache, PostgreSQL & PHP" - no EULA, no BSA,
no Dancing Monkey Boy and no Chairman Bill. And you get access to the source
code and permission to change it all you want.

That is impossible for Microsoft to beat at any price, let alone FREE!

Quote:> > By the way, what is .NET?
> http://www.microsoft.com/net - the question you asked is
> explained very well.

I asked YOU what .NET was.

Quote:> Also do a quick search on Google (Google also has a free
> .NET XML Web Service API you can call from your
> applications, licenced for 1000 searche a day if I
> remember the number correctly!)

It is a free XML Web Service API - works with .NET, Java and whatever. So
what?

You do know that Google is run exclusively on Linux, don't you?

8^)

Best regards,

Brian
Linux Mystic
open sorcerer