What to set in graphics for PDFs

What to set in graphics for PDFs

Post by phu.. » Sun, 20 Feb 2000 04:00:00



I am using FameMaker to prepare documents for final output as PDFs for
printing. However, I don't know who my printer/prepress will and won't
know until after the documents are finished. How should I deal with any
graphics that I want to put into the FrameMaker file?

I am primarily importing graphics as tiffs and sometimes as ps/eps for
vector graphics. What I am interested to know is what I should and can
do about the graphics before import into FrameMaker or before making
the PDFs. I am thinking of isseus such as trapping, knockouts and other
settings that I can set in my graphic programs.

Grateful for any enlightenment.

Petre

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What to set in graphics for PDFs

Post by georg » Tue, 22 Feb 2000 04:00:00


I can only speak for myself here on this one. I'm sure
you'll
find others with a different opinion. I cringe when I see a
Framemaker project come into our shop. We work with them and
achieve pleasing results, but the extra hassel is painful. I
would much rather wrestle with a large Pagemaker document
than a Framemaker project. After pre-qualifying my response
by saying that, I realize that there could possibly be no
other way on your part to get the project done.

One thing to keep in mind if you are going to make the pdf's
yourself is that you may have to live with the results of
how
you create your pdf's or have your project put on hold while
you recreate them using the printer's specific instructions.
Why don't you just send out the Framemaker files along with
all your support files and fonts?

If you are dead set against this then when you make your
pdf's you might achieve more desirable overall results by
printing a postscript file out of Framemaker and then
distilling that monsterous file as opposed to creating the
pdf's staight from Framemaker, but there are drawbacks.

If your project has bleed of any sorts. You will have to
choose a ppd when you print your postscript file that
enables
you to have a custom paper size and make your paper size 1/4
larger than your original page size. For instance, if your
page size is 8 1/2 x 11, then you will have to make your
paper size 8 3/4 x 11 1/4. When you do this, you will then
be
able to distill your postscript and get your pdf's with
bleed
on them, but you will notice that any tiff's you have placed
in Framemaker will be shifted up and to the left the
distance
that you added for your extra paper size. The only way I've
found to avoid this disaster from occuring is to save all
your tiff's as .eps. Here is where the painful part comes
in.
How many tiffs do you have placed? Framemaker projects are
usually large catalogs made from huge data bases with
hundreds of pages. We found this out the hard way by
outputting a large project to film, making a blueline,
sending it to the customer and they discovered the problem.
We then had to reoutput the film after struggling for quite
a
while to figure out just what was going on. Painful!

Once you get your postscript made exactly the right way and
you are ready to distill, then again you'll want to be very
careful to achieve desirable results. In the Distiller Job
Options you'll want to downsample to 300 dpi on your color
and grayscale bitmaps, but I don't recomend using any
compression since you don't know if the printer's rip can
handle this or not-therefore you will get much larger files.
You will want to downsample monocrome bitmaps to 1200 or so.
You will need to subset and embed all fonts below 99% and in
the last dialog you don't want anything selected. Transfer
functions and ucr you will want to remove and color
conversions you'll want to say unchanged. This still won't
guarentee you won't any problems.

Maybe I've changed your mind about making your own pdf's.

Maybe I've changed your mind about using Framemaker.

Anyways, hope your project comes out as you planned it.

* Sent from RemarQ http://www.remarq.com The Internet's Discussion Network *
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What to set in graphics for PDFs

Post by phu.. » Thu, 24 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Thanks for your detailed reply. I am using FrameMaker because I used to
use it for lengthy docs (such as thesis!) but my project now consists
of a large number of smaller files with more graphics, all using a few
templates.

I have always printed ps files from FrameMaker and then distill, so
that's not a problem. Your point on bleeds and other things are
interesting. I will bear them in mind. Any other advice will be much
appreciated.

By the way, I was looking at InDesign for a while (although I can't
really afford it, I think). What's your opinion of it?

Petre

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Before you buy.

 
 
 

What to set in graphics for PDFs

Post by Len Schmi » Tue, 29 Feb 2000 04:00:00



> If I make the pdf's with (for?) 2400 dpi, no compression,
> other options as suggested, is it possible for the printer
> to use them if his imagesetter ouputs, say, 1270 dpi?

> As somebody suggested in another thread, a lot of us are
> confused about the proper ways to create pdf's. Apparently
> one should know the dpi/linescreen settings for the specific
> output device and maybe also take the imposition s/w in
> consideration somehow. But if these are not known, how to
> make an educated guess? Better not?

It's always best to talk to the printer ahead of time, but here are some
general guidelines (note: I am not a PDF expert, this is just what works
for me, I'd love to hear what more experienced people have to say.)

-->Compatibility: Acrobat 3
A lot of rips and imposition programs have problems with Acrobat 4.

--> Don't "Optimize PDF"
I have no idea why, but people tell me that "optimizing" can*'em up.

-->Resolution: 2400
I set this to 2400 'cause that's what I image at. I have no idea what
Acrobat actually does with this information. Is it for calculating
flatness and stuff? Anyway, it doesn't seem to matter if you output to a
lower res device, so I wouldn't worry about it.

-->Binding: Left
I just leave this at the default. Does anyone know what the hell this does?

-->for Color and Grayscale: Bicubic Downsampling at 300dpi
This is an adequate setting for printing up to a 150lpi screen. If
you're printing a much finer screen (like that 1100lpi job I heard
about, Wow!) you might want to set this higher or leave it off
altogether. But for 99% of print jobs this is a good setting.

-->for Color and Grayscale: Compression: Automatic & Quality: Maximum
There still exists a great Fear of Compression, but don't fall for it.
Turning a 180MB EPS into a 1.3MB PDF is one of the great joys of
Distiller. JPEG compression will slightly degrade an image (not visible
to the eye, but if you were to extract the image and edit it you might
notice something) so if you're super-paranoid, you might set compression
to ZIP, which will not degrade the image.

-->for Monochrome Bitmap: no downsampling
For bitmaps, the more dpi the merrier (up to the res of the image
setter), so leave this off. And they don't take up much space if you set

-->for Monochrome Bitmap: CCITT Group 4
All four of the options here are lossless compression, so you have
nothing to lose by turning it on. I don't really know which one is best,
so I just leave it at the default.

--> Compress Text and Line Art ON!
Again, nothing to lose, so turn it on.

--> Embed All Fonts ON!
What's the frickin' point of PDF's if we don't embed all the fonts?

--> Subset OFF!
Might as well embed them all, while we're at it.

--> When Embedding Fails: Cancel Job
This way you won't accidentally make a PDF without fonts. Some fonts
won't embed, so if you need to make a PDF with those fonts you must
temporarily turn this off. But remember to send the font with the file!

The whole Color section is voodoo to me. I go with:

--> Leave Color Unchanged
In general, when it comes to color management, if you don't know what
you're doing stay the hell away from it! To err is human, but to really
*things up requires CM.

--> Preserve Overprint Settings ON
Seems right to me. Don't know why. I leave the others off.

Ditto with the Advanced section. Voodoo. I check everything except
"Allow PostScript File To Override Job Options," which I turn off. Don't
really know why, except that it works for me.

I'm sorry, I've really typed quite a bit here, but if any PDFexperts are
still reading, I'd love to hear commentary on these settings.

--
Len

 
 
 

What to set in graphics for PDFs

Post by Pekk » Wed, 01 Mar 2000 04:00:00


It was interesting to read George's reply, as I am in the
same position - have some FM files and have to deliver them,
before I know the printer. Sending as Frame is not an
option, as I am quite certain it would come bouncing back to
me.

If I make the pdf's with (for?) 2400 dpi, no compression,
other options as suggested, is it possible for the printer
to use them if his imagesetter ouputs, say, 1270 dpi?

As somebody suggested in another thread, a lot of us are
confused about the proper ways to create pdf's. Apparently
one should know the dpi/linescreen settings for the specific
output device and maybe also take the imposition s/w in
consideration somehow. But if these are not known, how to
make an educated guess? Better not?

I admit that things like adjusting bleed and trapping go
over my head, but then I am just a stupid translator. I
sincerely hope that whoever composed the original files
understood things better than me!-) and that bleeds and
trappings are ok.

It seems that some printers are (already) offering their
work and expecting print-ready pdf files thus saving in
rarely needed fonts and updates other than Acrobat!? I would
love to deliver clean material that outputs well but Acrobat
does not seem to offer much help over a traditional .PS made
with the required PPD. Or does it?

Pekka

 
 
 

What to set in graphics for PDFs

Post by Mikhail Kouvchino » Wed, 01 Mar 2000 04:00:00



> --> Embed All Fonts ON!
> What's the frickin' point of PDF's if we don't embed all the fonts?

> --> Subset OFF!
> Might as well embed them all, while we're at it.

There is serious, but not good documented problem with fonts and PDF.
Even if font is embedded,  Reader use for display installed in system
font with same name, but NOT embedded one. As opposite, if not whole
font, but only subset is embedded, Reader treats it more carefully, and
use embedded font even if equally named fond is installed in system.

So if you like maintain document view exact same at different computers,
best option is "Subset below 99%". Drawback is difficulties to touch up
text at such PDF.

Probably, problem is not obvious for English-speaking community.  But
for other languages there is minor (or even major f.e. for Russian)
differences between Windows and Mac fonts, ets. Even in English
documents special symbols often looks differently on different
computers. So using for viewing exactly the same font as for document
making generally is a good idea, and you should make font subsets.

Best regards, Mike

 
 
 

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