This must take the biscuit, spamwise....

This must take the biscuit, spamwise....

Post by Ian Kemmi » Sun, 12 Jan 2003 04:01:15



Like thousands of other people, I just received spam attempting to induce me to
download an executable file from a `personal' web space area apparently
belonging to an AOL customer.

Being a public-spirited individual, I immediately forwarded this to

might prevent some people getting their machines broken into.

This was promptly bounced, along with a very rude message to the effect that I
ought not try to send bulk mail to AOL.....

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Ian Kemmish                   18 Durham Close, Biggleswade, Beds SG18 8HZ, UK

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
If you can keep your head while all around are losing theirs - people will
really hate you.

 
 
 

This must take the biscuit, spamwise....

Post by Derek Tre » Sun, 12 Jan 2003 07:21:22




>Like thousands of other people, I just received spam attempting to
>induce me to
>download an executable file from a `personal' web space area apparently
>belonging to an AOL customer.

>Being a public-spirited individual, I immediately forwarded this to

>might prevent some people getting their machines broken into.

>This was promptly bounced, along with a very rude message to the effect that I
>ought not try to send bulk mail to AOL.....

Serves you right for even trying :-)
I have a couple of AOL accounts for purposes I won't bore you with.
Suffice to say that despite all their latest ant-spamming  wizards and
gizmos each account still attracts around 100 slices of quality spam a
week - and that's not counting the "bulk mail".

Telling AOL that one of it's customers is spamming you is about as
worthwhile as telling impressionable young female interns not to have
anything to do with senior US politicians with cigars in their hands.
--
Del Tree

 
 
 

This must take the biscuit, spamwise....

Post by Chri » Sun, 12 Jan 2003 17:53:33



> Like thousands of other people, I just received spam attempting to induce me to
> download an executable file from a `personal' web space area apparently
> belonging to an AOL customer.

> Being a public-spirited individual, I immediately forwarded this to

> might prevent some people getting their machines broken into.

> This was promptly bounced, along with a very rude message to the effect that I
> ought not try to send bulk mail to AOL.....

> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> Ian Kemmish                   18 Durham Close, Biggleswade, Beds SG18 8HZ, UK

> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> If you can keep your head while all around are losing theirs - people will
> really hate you.

AOL might be using an anti spam list that may contain IPs or domains from your
account.  If you are using a free or University account, you may be blacklisted on
several anti spam lists.  This may be the reason why you would get an abusive
reply.

The worst anti spam list I've come across so far is ORBZ.  I have yet to receive
any email (either spam or not) in an account that I enabled ORBZ to autodelete
incoming spam.  According to ORBZ, all msn, hotmail, AOL, yahoo, e*, etc.
addresses are grounds to be autodeleted (I'm beginning to think that as long as
it's simply an email, it's grounds to be deleted).  Luckily, that account is only
for testing purposes and I have set up my own custom server spam filters.  I am
allowing a maximum of 10 spams per day (24 hours) as normal (it used to be
50-60!).  On average I get seven though.

--
Chris

 
 
 

1. This takes the biscuit! (RANT)

Hi all,

Today we received a "rush" job from a good client who asked us to
prepare it for repro as "a favour".
This is a very good client so we agreed. The job was a 32pp 4 colour
brochure previewing the work of students within the Graphic Design
faculty of a leading British University. The artwork had been prepared
by no less a genius than the Head of the Faculty Teaching Staff - a
Professor, no less, with 15 years experience in teaching Graphic Design
to the best and brightest in the land. Got the picture?

Here's  a list of what we found when we looked at the "artwork".

1. RBG colors used in Quirk: "Green" and "Red".
2. Spot colors set to sep to RGB black in Quirk
3. A tiny 2" by 1" logo is placed within an A4 sized Photoshop document
so as to bring the PMS 447 background color into Quirk. The Quirk pic
box is filled with PMS 447 specified to a different cmyk combination...
There were 8 images like this...
4. 159 fonts used in the document.
5. Bastardized italic and bold used througout.
6. Quirk doc size is 210mm square. Background images placed in Quirk are
in boxes size 240mm x 226mm. There is 16mm bleed at the top edge - none
at the bottom edge, 20mm on the right edge, 10mm at the left edge.
7. Ai logos use RGB colors.
8. Rich black is specified as 100c 100m 100y 100k.
9. Margin guides and cols set on the master pages are ignored within the
document pages which use manaully placed guides to align and position
matter.

I could go on... but it would tire your patience. About the only thing
the "professor" got right was that all the raster images used are saved
at 300 dpi and in cmyk format.

If this is what is being taught nowadays the Lord help us all. I can't
wait to get out this bloody industry! Only 5 more years.... :-)
--
Del Tree

2. how to verify a backup tape

3. To Anyone Taking/Took SQL 7 Design....

4. cache backup?

5. HELP just built a new system and runs like a limp biscuit...

6. 'Biscuit' SBC help required..

7. Rubber biscuit

8. Does Vuescan offer taking away scratch and dust feature?

9. computer takes longer and longer to initialize HP 3C

10. Help - HP 6250cxi takes ten minutes to scan (sometimes)

11. 3300c takes two times ???