Code Page Mapping

Code Page Mapping

Post by Thorsten » Thu, 24 Jan 2002 17:37:38



Hello to everybody,

we are currently implementing PDF export for our reporting tool under
Windows. We support different code pages, like Cyrillic, Turkish, Hebrew,
etc.

Supporting different code pages and character sets seems to be the most
difficult part on creating PDF files.

My question is:
How can we map for example the Cyrillic code page into PDF / PostScript
characters?

In addition, it seems the 14 standard Adobe fonts do not contain for example
Cyrillic characters, so where can we get Cyrillic (and Arabic, etc.)
versions of the standard fonts - and AFM files? Do we need to embedd them
into the PDF files, because we can not rely that they are installed on the
target machines where the PDF files are opened?

If we embedd Windows True-Type fonts into the PDF documents, we have the
same problem: how to map into the cyrillic code page, can this only be done
by using Unicode? (If so, it is ok for us, we just want to know if this is
the right way.)

Final question: do embedded Windows True-Type fonts display correctly on
other platforms, like Unix or Macintosh?

Thanks in advance.

Regards
Thorsten Radde
IDEAL Software GmbH

============================
IDEAL Software GmbH
Helmholtzstr. 6
41464 Neuss
Germany
Tel: +49 2131 9800-23
Fax: +49 2131 9800-24
http://www.IdealSoftware.com
http://www.IdealSoftware.de
============================

 
 
 

Code Page Mapping

Post by Aandi Inst » Thu, 24 Jan 2002 18:25:33



>How can we map for example the Cyrillic code page into PDF / PostScript
>characters?

Adobe do publish a table of recommended names for glyphs in Cyrillic,
and a CE encoding. You don't have to follow this, but by doing so you
will help the user of the file considerably, since text search and
extraction, and indexing, is more likely to work.

Cyrillic can be done in a single byte font, so it is otherwise
comparatively straightforward (at least, compared to far Eastern
fonts).

Quote:

>In addition, it seems the 14 standard Adobe fonts do not contain for example
>Cyrillic characters, so where can we get Cyrillic (and Arabic, etc.)
>versions of the standard fonts - and AFM files? Do we need to embedd them
>into the PDF files, because we can not rely that they are installed on the
>target machines where the PDF files are opened?

That is correct.

You have to find, buy, or license suitable fonts AND embed them. The
font substitution mechanism in Acrobat is only suitable for Latin1
fonts.

Quote:

>If we embedd Windows True-Type fonts into the PDF documents, we have the
>same problem: how to map into the cyrillic code page, can this only be done
>by using Unicode? (If so, it is ok for us, we just want to know if this is
>the right way.)

That I'm not sure about. One way to deal with embedded Unicode
TrueType fonts is to treat them as CID fonts, but that is not the
simplest way I'm sure.  Adobe recommend not re-encoding TrueType fonts
(though I often see it done). Perhaps a font created with the code
page you want and no Encoding in PDF will display as you wish.

Quote:

>Final question: do embedded Windows True-Type fonts display correctly on
>other platforms, like Unix or Macintosh?

They should [in Acrobat]. TrueType display is now handled by Acrobat,
it doesn't rely on the operating system.

----------------------------------------

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Code Page Mapping

Post by Mike Bremfor » Sun, 27 Jan 2002 08:08:01


Hi Thorsten

Good luck with this. Acrobat has poor support for glyphs outside the
standard WinAnsi lineup, or Chinese/Japanese/Korean.

As Aandi mentioned, there is a list called the "Adobe Standard Glyph
List", which in theory lists the characters that can be used, and
includes Cyrillic, possibly Hebrew, and  Arabic (normal forms only,
which won't do you much good). The trouble is this list can only be used
with a font that's encoded using these particular glyph names - most of
them aren't, so it won't get you very far.

TrueType's actually a little easier, because the majority are Unicode
encoded - so right away you know which glyph is which. With Type1 fonts,
unless the font designer has followed some sort of naming convention
(like, oooh, the Adobe Standard Glyph List perhaps), then all you've got
is a list of glyph names without actually knowing what they mean - it's
up to you to give them semantic meaning.

From there you can rewrite the font (which we do) for one byte per
character, or turn it into a CID font and use two bytes per character.

Cheers... Mike
--
----------------------------------------------------
Mike Bremford - CTO            
Big Faceless Organization    http://big.faceless.org


> Hello to everybody,

> we are currently implementing PDF export for our reporting tool under
> Windows. We support different code pages, like Cyrillic, Turkish, Hebrew,
> etc.

> Supporting different code pages and character sets seems to be the most
> difficult part on creating PDF files.

> My question is:
> How can we map for example the Cyrillic code page into PDF / PostScript
> characters?

> In addition, it seems the 14 standard Adobe fonts do not contain for example
> Cyrillic characters, so where can we get Cyrillic (and Arabic, etc.)
> versions of the standard fonts - and AFM files? Do we need to embedd them
> into the PDF files, because we can not rely that they are installed on the
> target machines where the PDF files are opened?

> If we embedd Windows True-Type fonts into the PDF documents, we have the
> same problem: how to map into the cyrillic code page, can this only be done
> by using Unicode? (If so, it is ok for us, we just want to know if this is
> the right way.)

> Final question: do embedded Windows True-Type fonts display correctly on
> other platforms, like Unix or Macintosh?

> Thanks in advance.

> Regards
> Thorsten Radde
> IDEAL Software GmbH

> ============================
> IDEAL Software GmbH
> Helmholtzstr. 6
> 41464 Neuss
> Germany
> Tel: +49 2131 9800-23
> Fax: +49 2131 9800-24
> http://www.IdealSoftware.com
> http://www.IdealSoftware.de
> ============================

 
 
 

1. Q:Any Techniques for Unit Code/House Code "Mapping"

Summary:
I'm about to add X-10 throughout our apartment. Is there a technique any of
you would like to share about logically choosing/organizing unit codes &
house codes.

Detail:
I know that whatever I come up with won't be able to take complete advantage
of what I've got, but just to get a sense of what I'm trying to coordinate:
10 WS467 Wall Switches
2 lamp modules (maybe a few more in the future.)
2 heavy duty A/C modules
2 Hawkeye Motion Sensors
1 Universal Module
HD11A Controller
1 Slimfire remote
2 older "fat" key chain remotes
3 PalmPads, an alarm keypad (can control unit codes 1-4)
X-10 Alarm system

More detail:
I'm trying to set it up so the PalmPad controllers have the most commonly
used lamps on units 1-8,  the rest of the place on 9-16. I know I have to
factor 2 addresses for motion sensors, I also know the keypad on my X10
security remote will only control units 1-4, my older key ring remotes only
will control 1/5, 2/7 or something like that. I'd also like to have room to
add a few more modules/switches down the pike. I'd also like "space" on my
Palm pads to kick off macros from my HD11A (I know that the this could be
done by "listening" to a different house code then the one used to execute
the macros.)

I've started sketching the layout of the place with all the switches &
modules in place. Should I number units going clockwise or outer walls first
then inner??? What about leaving some space "in between" for expansion?

It just seems overwhelming to even try to start off organized, let alone
keep it organized!

Thanks in Advance,
Mark Lipsy


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