Apt has coax for ethernet - usable?

Apt has coax for ethernet - usable?

Post by B Woost » Sat, 12 Jul 2003 09:31:23



So I moved to this place, and the apartment management
claims they are "wired for ethernet", but all they
point me to is a coax (just like TV) female socket.

I've two computers, both have standard RJ45 jacks.
I've connected them using a 4 port hub (only RJ45 connectors).

Is there any way to make use of the in-wall coax connectors?

First problem:
I'm assuming those are 10-base-2 wires - but - how do I visually
figure out if that is correct? (10-base-2 as opposed to
standard cable/tv)?

Second:
Is that coax wiring usable at all? Have to connect two computers
to a cable modem, and am looking for ideas if this is usable.

Thanks for any ideas/pointers.

 
 
 

Apt has coax for ethernet - usable?

Post by Gary Tai » Sat, 12 Jul 2003 11:25:01




Quote:>So I moved to this place, and the apartment management
>claims they are "wired for ethernet", but all they
>point me to is a coax (just like TV) female socket.

>I've two computers, both have standard RJ45 jacks.
>I've connected them using a 4 port hub (only RJ45 connectors).

>Is there any way to make use of the in-wall coax connectors?

>First problem:
>I'm assuming those are 10-base-2 wires - but - how do I visually
>figure out if that is correct? (10-base-2 as opposed to
>standard cable/tv)?

>Second:
>Is that coax wiring usable at all? Have to connect two computers
>to a cable modem, and am looking for ideas if this is usable.

>Thanks for any ideas/pointers.

Is it an F Connector, or a BNC? Ask the super to look at
someone elses setup, or how to use it (BTW, 10 base-2
is not in a star configuration where you can jack-in like TP ethernet,
you'd have two terminals. or a loop wth a tee in it, )

 
 
 

Apt has coax for ethernet - usable?

Post by Geo » Sat, 12 Jul 2003 11:41:02


I've been to college campus where the connections are via coax, and the room
device is a normal broadband router, just like the cable TV people give you.
They all head back to a Cisco device with  uBR blades.   In this case, it
could be that the apartment has centralized drops for the same thing, put in
place and served by the local cable operator.  Those drops would come off
the building feed with a different impedance and signal than the normal TV
portion of the broadband space.

I doubt it's 10Base2, unless this apartment was wired a LONG time ago!
Perhaps the apartment manager meant it was "wired for internet", and you
heard what you thought was "ethernet" as you know it.
Surfs up !
George Johnston
Logical Solutions for Integration
Clarity in an Unclear World

Quote:> So I moved to this place, and the apartment management
> claims they are "wired for ethernet", but all they
> point me to is a coax (just like TV) female socket.

> I've two computers, both have standard RJ45 jacks.
> I've connected them using a 4 port hub (only RJ45 connectors).

> Is there any way to make use of the in-wall coax connectors?

> First problem:
> I'm assuming those are 10-base-2 wires - but - how do I visually
> figure out if that is correct? (10-base-2 as opposed to
> standard cable/tv)?

> Second:
> Is that coax wiring usable at all? Have to connect two computers
> to a cable modem, and am looking for ideas if this is usable.

> Thanks for any ideas/pointers.

 
 
 

Apt has coax for ethernet - usable?

Post by Glen Herrmannsfeld » Sat, 12 Jul 2003 15:08:40





> >So I moved to this place, and the apartment management
> >claims they are "wired for ethernet", but all they
> >point me to is a coax (just like TV) female socket.

(snip)

Quote:> Is it an F Connector, or a BNC? Ask the super to look at
> someone elses setup, or how to use it (BTW, 10 base-2
> is not in a star configuration where you can jack-in like TP ethernet,
> you'd have two terminals. or a loop wth a tee in it, )

They used to make 8 port, or more, 10base2 repeaters just like 8 port UTP
repeaters, to run star coaxial ethernet.  If it is a BNC connector, that is
a possibility.

Most likely, though, what he has is TV coax to connect a cable modem.  Note
that technically cable modems are broadband ethernet, though somewhat more
advanced than 10broad36.

-- glen

 
 
 

Apt has coax for ethernet - usable?

Post by B Woost » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 04:43:30







> > >So I moved to this place, and the apartment management
> > >claims they are "wired for ethernet", but all they
> > >point me to is a coax (just like TV) female socket.
> > Is it an F Connector, or a BNC? Ask the super to look at
> Most likely, though, what he has is TV coax to connect a cable modem.  Note
> that technically cable modems are broadband ethernet, though somewhat more
> advanced than 10broad36.
> -- glen

It is a new apartment, but I think the builder has no idea about
ethernet. He advertised it as "Ethernet Category 5" and pointed
me to a F-connector on the wall!
I can't imagine a builder today being so clueless...
I looked into the wiring closet - sure enough, there are six
coax cables in there - three for the TV/Cable are wired into
a splitter (which goes to the  roof antenna or cable input).
Three other wires - the supposed "Ethernet" - are* unattached...
So, I now have spare cables all home-run wiring, but I don't
know if this is  usable for ethernet at all... if anyone
has any ideas, let me know!
 
 
 

Apt has coax for ethernet - usable?

Post by Nukie Po » Tue, 15 Jul 2003 05:53:26








> > > >So I moved to this place, and the apartment management
> > > >claims they are "wired for ethernet", but all they
> > > >point me to is a coax (just like TV) female socket.
> > > Is it an F Connector, or a BNC? Ask the super to look at
> > Most likely, though, what he has is TV coax to connect a cable modem.
Note
> > that technically cable modems are broadband ethernet, though somewhat
more
> > advanced than 10broad36.
> > -- glen

> It is a new apartment, but I think the builder has no idea about
> ethernet. He advertised it as "Ethernet Category 5" and pointed
> me to a F-connector on the wall!
> I can't imagine a builder today being so clueless...
> I looked into the wiring closet - sure enough, there are six
> coax cables in there - three for the TV/Cable are wired into
> a splitter (which goes to the  roof antenna or cable input).
> Three other wires - the supposed "Ethernet" - are* unattached...
> So, I now have spare cables all home-run wiring, but I don't
> know if this is  usable for ethernet at all... if anyone
> has any ideas, let me know!

Get an old ThinNet 10Base2 card and try it.
 
 
 

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