Need help locating problem in small home network

Need help locating problem in small home network

Post by sma.. » Sat, 12 Jul 2003 14:10:49



Ok, I've got roadrunner installed in this house, so there is a cable
modem.  This cable modem is hooked to a four-port Ethernet router and
currently has two computers running Win XP hooked up to it.  I'm
attempting to add a third computer, but am running into problems.
Here is what I've bought/done (there is no server computer, btw...
just the router):
I have bought 100 feet of cat5e ethernet cable and some plugs.  The
cable is unstranded UTP.  Ok, I add a plug to each end in
straight-through configuration (or what i believe is... if you hold
the two ends so that both cords face away from you, the color pattern
is a translation (to use a geometry term)).  So, I check the cable for
continuity... its good.  I check the resistance... 3 ohms per wire...
exactly what it should be for 24 AWG copper wire 100 feet long.
Therefore, there are no loose connections between cable and plug and
no shorts in the wire.  I hook the computer upstairs up to the router
via this cable and get nothing... it doesnt even recognize that the
cable is there.  I plug the computer into the router with a shorter
cable (i had to bring the box downstairs to do this)... it works just
fine.  The computer is configured to use DHCP, and it automatically
configures itself and connects to the internet just fine.  I try again
with the cable that I have made and it doesnt work again.  I switch
back to the short cable... it works... my cable... it doesn't.  At
this point I have no clue what is wrong with it.  It's cat5e so it
should theoretically be able to go 300 feet or more without any
problems, so why isn't it working at 100 feet?  The shorter cable was
straight-through configured so i know I shouldnt be using a crossover
cable.  There are really only two possibilities that I (in my *very*
humble capacity) can see... either I'm getting some cross-talk out of
the wazoo, or... the plugs are poor-fitting and are making bad contact
with the actual pins of the ethernet card.  I've noticed that the plug
is quite difficult to get in and out of the sockets... a very tight
fit.  Anyway, if anyone can either tell me which issue it is... or can
come up with something that I can't think of, I would *very much*
appreciate the help!  If I posted this wrong, then I am very sorry to
waste your time, and would appreciate a point to the right newsgroup.
Thank you in advance!
 
 
 

Need help locating problem in small home network

Post by Stuart Robins » Sat, 12 Jul 2003 16:32:00


Did you wire the plugs so that there is a pair of wires on pins 1,2 and
3,6 ?

If you did not, then it wont work.

Look at this;

http://www.netspec.com/helpdesk/wiredoc.html

Note how the green pair is on pins 3 and 6

Stuart.

 
 
 

Need help locating problem in small home network

Post by Jacob Westenbac » Sun, 13 Jul 2003 02:37:15



Quote:> Ok, I've got roadrunner installed in this house, so there is a cable
> modem.  This cable modem is hooked to a four-port Ethernet router and
> currently has two computers running Win XP hooked up to it.  I'm
> attempting to add a third computer, but am running into problems.
> Here is what I've bought/done (there is no server computer, btw...
> just the router):
> I have bought 100 feet of cat5e ethernet cable and some plugs.  The
> cable is unstranded UTP.  Ok, I add a plug to each end in
> straight-through configuration (or what i believe is... if you hold
> the two ends so that both cords face away from you, the color pattern
> is a translation (to use a geometry term)).  So, I check the cable for
> continuity... its good.  I check the resistance... 3 ohms per wire...
> exactly what it should be for 24 AWG copper wire 100 feet long.

Full electrical continuity does not insure compliance with RJ-45 specs.
Since you have functional cables at hand, compare the color order within the
plugs of a known good cable and the one(s) you have built yourself.  Make
your connections match those of the working cable.

JW

 
 
 

Need help locating problem in small home network

Post by Hansang Ba » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 08:53:57



Quote:> Ok, I've got roadrunner installed in this house, so there is a cable
> modem.  This cable modem is hooked to a four-port Ethernet router and
> currently has two computers running Win XP hooked up to it.  I'm
> attempting to add a third computer, but am running into problems.
> Here is what I've bought/done (there is no server computer, btw...
> just the router):
> I have bought 100 feet of cat5e ethernet cable and some plugs.  The
> cable is unstranded UTP.  Ok, I add a plug to each end in
> straight-through configuration (or what i believe is... if you hold
> the two ends so that both cords face away from you, the color pattern
> is a translation (to use a geometry term)).  So, I check the cable for
> continuity... its good.  I check the resistance... 3 ohms per wire...

Some warning bells just went off. If you used solid-core cable
(unstranded), then you *have* to use jacks made specifically for solid-
core cables.  Otherwise, you'll get flakey behavior.

Also, the cables are not supposed to be 12345678 to 12345678.  Ethernet
uses 1236.  Google will bring up many many sites on how to wire it up
properly.

--

hsb

"Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding"  Calvin
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Need help locating problem in small home network

Post by Glen Herrmannsfeld » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 11:09:49



Quote:> Some warning bells just went off. If you used solid-core cable
> (unstranded), then you *have* to use jacks made specifically for solid-
> core cables.  Otherwise, you'll get flakey behavior.

I have only seen jacks designed for solid wire, but he wired them directly
into plugs.  Yes, those do come designed for either stranded or solid wire,
and don't work reliably if used with the wrong type.  Also, even with the
correct plugs, solid wire connections are less reliable than one would
desire.  I have also seen enough loose connections in commercial stranded
patch cables to know that can always be a problem.

Quote:> Also, the cables are not supposed to be 12345678 to 12345678.  Ethernet
> uses 1236.  Google will bring up many many sites on how to wire it up
> properly.

But yes, most likely the cables are mispaired.    Though it was my
understanding that link pulses would still come through, and the link light
would still come on, with mispaired cables.  Maybe that is only for 10baseT,
though.  He seemed to indicate that the link light did not come on.

-- glen

 
 
 

Need help locating problem in small home network

Post by Stuart Robins » Tue, 15 Jul 2003 06:16:00


Quote:> Since you have functional cables at hand, compare the color order
> within the
> plugs of a known good cable and the one(s) you have built yourself.  
> Make
> your connections match those of the working cable.

If the 'functional' cable is very short it might well work even if its
wired with split pairs. Not much point in copying it.

Stuart.

 
 
 

Need help locating problem in small home network

Post by ch.. » Wed, 16 Jul 2003 23:30:42


Quote:>I have only seen jacks designed for solid wire, but he wired them directly
>into plugs.  Yes, those do come designed for either stranded or solid wire,
>and don't work reliably if used with the wrong type.  Also, even with the
>correct plugs, solid wire connections are less reliable than one would
>desire.  I have also seen enough loose connections in commercial stranded
>patch cables to know that can always be a problem.

I use the tri-point connectors which work on either solid or stranded.
Difficulty getting the connector plugged in usually means the
connector was not fully crimped.

Quote:>But yes, most likely the cables are mispaired.    Though it was my
>understanding that link pulses would still come through, and the link light
>would still come on, with mispaired cables.  Maybe that is only for 10baseT,
>though.  He seemed to indicate that the link light did not come on.

In my experience, a short cable with split pairs will usually link up
but as it gets longer you get a rather high error rate and eventually
it will fail to link up.

-Chris

 
 
 

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