Layman question: name the brew...

Layman question: name the brew...

Post by Mark Nelso » Tue, 18 Feb 1997 04:00:00




> Here's the problem:

> [1] A few programmers, wishing development solitude, will be heading
> to extremely remote parts to do some intense coding.

> [2] Their sole means of communication with the outside world will
> be via Inmarsat-M, which offers a whopping 2400 baud data rate, and
> costs $3.00 per minute.
> Any wisdom would be greatly appreciated.

Federal Express.

-----------------------------
Mark Nelson

http://web2.airmail.net/markn

 
 
 

Layman question: name the brew...

Post by William Mart » Wed, 19 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Here's the problem:

[1] A few programmers, wishing development solitude, will be heading
to extremely remote parts to do some intense coding.

[2] Their sole means of communication with the outside world will
be via Inmarsat-M, which offers a whopping 2400 baud data rate, and
costs $3.00 per minute.

[3] Said programmers are cheap, yet need to do regular source code
updates to New York.

[4] Said uploads will contain primarily C and Java source code, as well
as email (which we're not that worried about).

[5] We have plenty of disk space and processing power at both ends of the link.

[6] We don't care how long it takes to en/decode.

Given the givens, what would you compression experts suggest as a buck-saver?
I'm assuming we can do better than gzip, here.

Any wisdom would be greatly appreciated.

-Will

 
 
 

Layman question: name the brew...

Post by Colin Doole » Wed, 19 Feb 1997 04:00:00



> Given the givens, what would you compression experts suggest as a buck-saver?
> I'm assuming we can do better than gzip, here.

bzip is generally 10-20% better than gzip, you can get it from:

http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/arch/people/j-seward/index.html

I think this is the best freely available compressor (but I'm
willing to be flamed on this!), use it in combination with
"tar" for multiple files/directories.

--
<\___/>
/ O O \
\_____/  FTB.

Bill Gates *never* said "640k should be enough for anybody"...

See        http://www.urbanlegends.com/celebrities/bill.gates/

 
 
 

Layman question: name the brew...

Post by Eric Hildu » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00




> > Here's the problem:

> > [1] A few programmers, wishing development solitude, will be heading
> > to extremely remote parts to do some intense coding.

> > [2] Their sole means of communication with the outside world will
> > be via Inmarsat-M, which offers a whopping 2400 baud data rate, and
> > costs $3.00 per minute.

> > Any wisdom would be greatly appreciated.

> Federal Express.

> -----------------------------
> Mark Nelson

> http://web2.airmail.net/markn

That may be a little tough for Fed Ex. INMARSAT is a satelite service for marine (i.e. ocean
going ships) services. They are good, but I doubt they are that good yet, unless they have
recently installed floats on one of their jets. ;-)
 
 
 

Layman question: name the brew...

Post by guy cot » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00




> > Here's the problem:

> > [1] A few programmers, wishing development solitude, will be heading
> > to extremely remote parts to do some intense coding.

> > [2] Their sole means of communication with the outside world will
> > be via Inmarsat-M, which offers a whopping 2400 baud data rate, and
> > costs $3.00 per minute.

> > Any wisdom would be greatly appreciated.

> Federal Express.

> -----------------------------
> Mark Nelson

> http://web2.airmail.net/markn

If you're in North America, MSAT is a bit cheaper, but same bit
rate.

You can get 64 kbps with Inmarsat-B (I suggest the
terminal by California Microwave) at about $10/min - cheaper than
Inmarsat-M.

--
****************************************************************
Guy Cote                                * Home:
Department of Electrical Engineering    * 3858 Ortona Crescent
University of British Columbia          * Vancouver BC V6R 1X7
2356 Main Mall                          * (604)-221-9024  
Vancouver BC V6T 1Z4                    *
604-822-4988  ; 604-822-5949 (Fax)      *

 
 
 

Layman question: name the brew...

Post by William Mart » Sat, 22 Feb 1997 04:00:00


: You can get 64 kbps with Inmarsat-B (I suggest the
: terminal by California Microwave) at about $10/min - cheaper than
: Inmarsat-M.

Thanks for the lead - I called Cal Mike and got a brochure and pricing.
While it is true that the cost per bit of -B is alot cheaper, *man* do
you pay the difference in inconvenience.  Their B system weighs 55lbs.,
and eats 100W of juice - we'll need to haul a car battery around to
power the thing!  Plus we'll need to get a fractional T1 drop from the downlink
site in Canada to New York (NOT cheap). Then there's the 50 grand it'll
cost (with the bells and whistles), vs.  $3,000 for the M system.

I can transfer about 38k worth of data for a buck on B (off-peak), or about
5k on M (any time).  That means I have to transfer 1.5 gigabytes of data
before we break even on the B system, after which it becomes *alot*
cheaper than M.  Since we're not talking about a permenant outpost,
and video-conferencing is out of the question, that's a tough call.  

The economics are a bit more subtle than it would seem on the
surface...Let's see...if I am planning on 10Mb per week of transfers,
that's about $2000 for M, or about $260 for "B".  Applying the
difference to the up-front costs of the "B" system, it turns out that
if we are gone longer than 7 months, the B system becomes more economical.

I think the answer here is to see how much it costs to rent a "B" system.
If it turns out to be a few grand a month, we'll be way ahead....oh wait,
I forgot about the leased line....ARRRGH!

Anyway, thanks again.

-Will

 
 
 

1. layman's question

Hello. Will you tolerate a layman's question? Lets say you know you will
always be compressing strings with a certain percentage of ones. For
instance, maybe you will always compress strings with 10% ones and the rest
zeros. Is there a rule of thumb for the compression rate you can get (on
average). For instace if you are always compressing strings with 1/8 ones
and the rest zeros, does this mean you will generally be able to compress it
to 1/8 the size? I mean using standard compression techniques is there a
rule of thumb?

I ask because the type of data I want to send has lots of zeros and few
ones.

Thank you,
Walt Wilson
Minnesota

2. LaTeX complains of missing fonts

3. Naive question from a layman

4. Matlab Matrix times Vector

5. Get Computer Name or Workgroup Name in Network Neighborhood Question

6. WORK*Phone

7. CD Burning .... I am a layman ....

8. layman terms

9. Compression 101 for laymen?

10. Layman's Guide to ASN.1 -- Where?

11. Help: Need Layman's Definition of Base Class Libraries

12. Slightly off-subject... layman's description of "significance"