Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by Barbara Schmi » Wed, 24 Jan 2001 03:23:12



I was wondering if there was anyway to not use a DNS server?
 
 
 

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by David J. Karpu » Wed, 24 Jan 2001 04:06:21


The only way that I know would be to memorize every IP address that you want
to access on the internet, URLs only work because of DNSs.


Quote:> I was wondering if there was anyway to not use a DNS server?


 
 
 

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by Bill » Wed, 24 Jan 2001 04:28:24


On Mon, 22 Jan 2001 12:23:12 -0600, "Barbara Schmid"


>I was wondering if there was anyway to not use a DNS server?

Sure... but remembering and/or keeping your own HOSTS file of all
those dot addresses would get old pretty quick :-).

Try Yahoo with no DNS at: http://64.58.76.176

Seriously, on today's web it's impractical.

Bill

 
 
 

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by Ray » Wed, 24 Jan 2001 04:32:36


Memorize the IP addresses of all the sites you want to visit. And your email
server and your newsgroup server...


Quote:> I was wondering if there was anyway to not use a DNS server?

 
 
 

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by Scott Norwo » Wed, 24 Jan 2001 04:44:31




Quote:

>The only way that I know would be to memorize every IP address that you want
>to access on the internet, URLs only work because of DNSs.

                            ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Not true.  URLs can contain IP addresses instead of hostnames and/or
can contain hostnames which exists only in the local hosts file
or in an NIS or WINS host database.

But, practically speaking, you need DNS.  If your ISP's DNS server is
not effective, there is nothing preventing you from running your own
DNS server on your local machine/network.

 
 
 

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by Ron Walke » Wed, 24 Jan 2001 05:58:18


A lot of us at Verizon are without one a lot of the time :)

seriously, you can't do much without DNS.


Quote:> I was wondering if there was anyway to not use a DNS server?

 
 
 

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by Rod Smi » Wed, 24 Jan 2001 12:22:34






>> I was wondering if there was anyway to not use a DNS server?

> A lot of us at Verizon are without one a lot of the time :)

> seriously, you can't do much without DNS.

It's unclear why the original poster asked the question, but if it was
to get around a problem like a flaky DNS server at an ISP, one
workaround is to run YOUR OWN DNS server. IIRC, there's a HOWTO on the
subject. Another workaround is to use somebody else's DNS server,
although the general consensus when this topic comes up is to do this
only if you've got some relationship with whoever runs that alternative
DNS server (say, they're your backup ISP or whatnot).

--

http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux & multi-OS configuration

 
 
 

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by braer.. » Wed, 24 Jan 2001 21:33:50





> >The only way that I know would be to memorize every IP address that you
> >want to access on the internet, URLs only work because of DNSs.
> Not true.  URLs can contain IP addresses instead of hostnames and/or
> can contain hostnames which exists only in the local hosts file
> or in an NIS or WINS host database.
> But, practically speaking, you need DNS.  If your ISP's DNS server is
> not effective, there is nothing preventing you from running your own
> DNS server on your local machine/network.

Scott, since most people using ADSL are constrained by the provider to
used some sort of dynamic IP assignments, running DNS services is not
very practical. If someone had a static Ip then I would certainly point
them in that direction. Also, the environment for which one could run a
DNS server is not trivial. It would require an operating system to be
capable of supporting such a service (W2K/Linux/etc.).
 
 
 

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by Rod Smi » Wed, 24 Jan 2001 23:43:57





>> If your ISP's DNS server is
>> not effective, there is nothing preventing you from running your own
>> DNS server on your local machine/network.

> Scott, since most people using ADSL are constrained by the provider to
> used some sort of dynamic IP assignments, running DNS services is not
> very practical.

That's only true if you want to run your own DNS server for outside
users. Running DNS for *INTERNAL* use is not so constrained; you can run
your own DNS server FOR YOURSELF on a dynamic IP system. In fact, there
are packages available designed with this in mind.

A personal DNS server can either proxy to an ISP's server (in which case
it won't improve the reliability of a flaky ISP server), or it can go to
the Internet's root servers directly and follow the chain of references.
The latter may actually be slower than relying on an ISP's server, if
that server operates correctly; but it may be more reliable in some
cases. Following these links doesn't require a static IP address.

Quote:> Also, the environment for which one could run a
> DNS server is not trivial. It would require an operating system to be
> capable of supporting such a service (W2K/Linux/etc.).

DNS servers are available for almost every OS that supports TCP/IP. (I
don't know about DOS.) For instance, DNS Plus (http://www.jhsoft.com)
runs on Windows 9x/Me, and QuickDNS Pro (http://www.menandmice.com)
does the job in MacOS. I've never used either of these, though; I just
found them in a brief search of Windows and MacOS file archive sites.

Now, that said, running a DNS server isn't for everybody; it's another
program running that might conceivably cause problems, particularly if
it's got a security bug that could be exploited from outside. It is an
option if your ISP's DNS server is flaky, though.

--

http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux & multi-OS configuration

 
 
 

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by Bob Peterso » Thu, 25 Jan 2001 00:12:31






>> >The only way that I know would be to memorize every IP address that you
>> >want to access on the internet, URLs only work because of DNSs.
>> Not true.  URLs can contain IP addresses instead of hostnames and/or
>> can contain hostnames which exists only in the local hosts file
>> or in an NIS or WINS host database.
>> But, practically speaking, you need DNS.  If your ISP's DNS server is
>> not effective, there is nothing preventing you from running your own
>> DNS server on your local machine/network.

>Scott, since most people using ADSL are constrained by the provider to
>used some sort of dynamic IP assignments, running DNS services is not
>very practical. If someone had a static Ip then I would certainly point
>them in that direction.

  A caching-only DNS server makes perfect sense regardless of the kind
of IP address assigned to a host.  A caching DNS server is one that
locally remembers recent query results, but isn't authoratative for
any domains, and in particular, isn't attempting to authoratatively
resolve the name of machine it is running on.  A caching DNS server
need not be visible to any hosts other than the one on which it runs!

Quote:>                      Also, the environment for which one could run a
>DNS server is not trivial. It would require an operating system to be
>capable of supporting such a service (W2K/Linux/etc.).

  Ports of BIND, the most commonly used DNS server, exist for Windows
95 as well as NT.  I have not personally run one under 95, but I've
successfully operated several under NT, both caching and
authoratative.

  A free NT version of BIND, somewhat old, is at
ftp://ftp.isc.org/isc/bind/contrib/ntbind/ or
http://ftp.tcp.com/pub/software/isc/bind/contrib/ntbind/.  I believe
these ports also run under 95.  The folks at http://www.software.com
offer an even older version, also free.

  According to
http://www.isc.org/products/BIND/docs/bind8.2_highlights.html, the
BIND 8.2.2 release supports NT.  This is the same source code used to
compile the version of BIND for Unix.

    Bob

 
 
 

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by Scott Norwo » Thu, 25 Jan 2001 01:16:46



>Scott, since most people using ADSL are constrained by the provider to
>used some sort of dynamic IP assignments, running DNS services is not
>very practical.

As I replied (more extensively) via private email, you can still run a
caching-only DNS server if you have a dynamic IP address.

Does anyone know if the Win32 resolver will accept "127.0.0.1" as a
namserver IP address?  Most Unix variants don't like it.  If it doesn't,
then, yes, it will be minimally inconvenient if you have to change
the nameserver address each time your machine is renumbered (though
you should still list other namservers as backups).  Of course, if your
machine is behind a router/firewall/NAT box, you can just assign it
a static IP address on the private network and all should be swell.
In any case, if you have a caching-only nameserver, it certainly does
not have to be accessible outside of your local network.

In any case, the ease of running a  nameserver is yet another reason why
dynamic IP addressing is bad.

Quote:>It would require an operating system to be
>capable of supporting such a service (W2K/Linux/etc.).

Doesn't the Win32 port of BIND run on Win9x as well?
 
 
 

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by jtnew » Thu, 25 Jan 2001 14:11:11



> I was wondering if there was anyway to not use a DNS server?

Yes if you use Linux, you can
setup your own DNS server.  I was having
many problems with Verizon's DNS server
so I setup my own in Linux, and now I never
have any problems.
 
 
 

Is there any way to not use a DNS server?

Post by Dave C » Wed, 31 Jan 2001 12:05:23


Memorize the numeric IP addresses of all your favorite web pages, your email
servers, etc. . . .

Real pain in the ass, but I suppose you could, if you really wanted to.

In other words, instead of typing www.whatisthis.com into your browser,
you'd type something like 123.597.765.432 (that's bogus, obviously)   -Dave

--
On linuxfreemail dot com, I am user "spamfilter".


Quote:> I was wondering if there was anyway to not use a DNS server?

 
 
 

1. DNS Server could not connect to DNS Server

Some of our customers who use Microsoft NT 4.0's DNS server have reported
that their event log is filling up with messages of the form:

DNS Server could not connect to DNS Server at <ip address>

In one case, the customer uses our firewall, so they have the forwarders
set to the bastion host address, and that's what shows up in the <ip
address>.  In another case, the IP addresses were 204.255.246.20
(dns4.moswest.msn.net) and 204.255.246.21 (dns5.moswest.msn.net) -- the
registered servers for the MSN.NET and MSN.COM domains.

This error message doesn't appear in BIND source, so it's presumably part
of Microsoft's "enhancements".  Does anyone know what causes it?  I
searched on MS's Support Online web page and couldn't find it.

One person here thought it had something to do with DNS forwarding to WINS;
when the DNS server loses its connection to the WINS server, it tries to
use DNS servers in its place, and cycling the WINS server might clear up
the problem.  But the customer I was working with today (the one whose
errors refer to the MSN.NET servers) says he isn't using WINS.

--

GTE Internetworking, Powered by BBN, Cambridge, MA
*** DON'T SEND TECHNICAL QUESTIONS DIRECTLY TO ME, post them to newsgroups.

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