CAT5 for phone/network

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by Shau » Fri, 16 Oct 1998 04:00:00



I have in my new house a single CAT5 Wire to each room in the house.  I want
to run a network and have 2 phone lines for each room.

I was thinking that I could run 10-base T using 568B by utilizing only the
orange and green pairs and take the blue and brown pairs for my phone line.

I will be putting dual outlets 1 CAT5 rate and 1 RJ-11.

Is this the correct way to go?

Shaun

 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by Richard Haskin » Fri, 16 Oct 1998 04:00:00


It's probably do-able but phones ring at high voltages
and that will induce currents on to your data pairs, is
that a big deal?  Probably not, but I would grab some
cheap cat3 cable from Home Depot and do the phones
with that.

Someday you may want to go to a full duplex, 4 pair
network protocol and you'll be happy you didn't fudge.


>I have in my new house a single CAT5 Wire to each room in the house.  I
want
>to run a network and have 2 phone lines for each room.

>I was thinking that I could run 10-base T using 568B by utilizing only the
>orange and green pairs and take the blue and brown pairs for my phone line.

>I will be putting dual outlets 1 CAT5 rate and 1 RJ-11.

>Is this the correct way to go?

>Shaun


 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by John Lundgre » Sat, 17 Oct 1998 04:00:00



> It's probably do-able but phones ring at high voltages
> and that will induce currents on to your data pairs, is
> that a big deal?  Probably not, but I would grab some
> cheap cat3 cable from Home Depot and do the phones
> with that.
> Someday you may want to go to a full duplex, 4 pair
> network protocol and you'll be happy you didn't fudge.

I would never run phone lines within the same 4pr cable as a network.
the problem is not the ringing current, which is low freq and is usually
a sine wave.  The problem is lightning and other fault currents getting
in from outside and ruining your NIC or hub.  And then there are the
numerous radio stations that use the phone line as an antenna to get
into everything.

Remember that ringing current is a differential mode signal, so twisted
pair should balance it out.  But lightning and RFI is common mode, and
is not balanced out, it's between both conductors and ground.  That gets
into the other pairs by capacitive and inductive coupling.


> >I have in my new house a single CAT5 Wire to each room in the house.  I want
> >to run a network and have 2 phone lines for each room.
> >I was thinking that I could run 10-base T using 568B by utilizing only the
> >orange and green pairs and take the blue and brown pairs for my phone line.
> >I will be putting dual outlets 1 CAT5 rate and 1 RJ-11.
> >Is this the correct way to go?
> >Shaun

--
Please remove NO and SPAM from my email addr to reply.

    Read what the FTC has to say about Junk Email at URL
    http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/online/inbox.htm
 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by Michael Cumming » Mon, 19 Oct 1998 04:00:00


While under construction, I ran CAT-3 for the phones and CAT-5 in each room
for the LAN in my new home.  Now I am not sure which standard to follow when
connecting the CAT-5 outlets to the CAT-5 pre-wired cable.

Which is the better way to go:  T568B  or  T568A  ???

Does it really matter as long as I am consistent with what I choose?  Why
the two different standards?


Thanks for any advice you can offer.

Cheers!
-Mike

 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by Jeff Kel » Tue, 20 Oct 1998 04:00:00


TS568-B in the United States.


Systems/Network Administrator
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by J. Clark » Wed, 21 Oct 1998 04:00:00


Either one will work fine as long as you are consistent.  If you're in the
US though you'll find that hardware that is already marked for or wired for
568-B is a lot easier to find.

--

--John

Reply to jclarke at eye bee em dot net.


>While under construction, I ran CAT-3 for the phones and CAT-5 in each room
>for the LAN in my new home.  Now I am not sure which standard to follow
when
>connecting the CAT-5 outlets to the CAT-5 pre-wired cable.

>Which is the better way to go:  T568B  or  T568A  ???

>Does it really matter as long as I am consistent with what I choose?  Why
>the two different standards?


>Thanks for any advice you can offer.

>Cheers!
>-Mike

 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by Jim Sokolof » Wed, 21 Oct 1998 04:00:00



> Which is the better way to go:  T568B  or  T568A  ???

568B is common in the US, but it doesn't matter much...

Quote:> Does it really matter as long as I am consistent with what I choose?  Why
> the two different standards?

...they are electrically identical; just the color coding is
different. So long as you are consistent, it makes no difference
whatsoever.

---Jim

 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by John Lundgre » Wed, 21 Oct 1998 04:00:00



> I read somewhere that to use "A" for residential and "B" for commercial,
> the explanation for "A": if you choose to use the rj45 jack for
> telephone purposes you could then use the 2nd pair for a second phone
> line....

The 568A or B has nothing to do with this.  It doesn't make any
difference.



> > > Which is the better way to go:  T568B  or  T568A  ???
> > 568B is common in the US, but it doesn't matter much...
> > > Does it really matter as long as I am consistent with what I choose?  Why
> > > the two different standards?
> > ...they are electrically identical; just the color coding is
> > different. So long as you are consistent, it makes no difference
> > whatsoever.
> > ---Jim

--
Please remove NO and SPAM from my email addr to reply.

    Read what the FTC has to say about Junk Email at URL
    http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/online/inbox.htm
 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by Chris Bischof » Wed, 21 Oct 1998 04:00:00


There is a difference between the two wiring schemes that is
significant. The T568A scheme is compatible with 1 or 2 pair USOC
systems (RJ-11 and RJ-14), the T568B is not. This means that if you
follow the T568A scheme, you could plug RJ-14 plug into a RJ-45 jack and
connect to both pairs 1 and 2, not just pair 1.

Chris Bischoff


> The color codes are different...



> > > I read somewhere that to use "A" for residential and "B" for commercial,
> > > the explanation for "A": if you choose to use the rj45 jack for
> > > telephone purposes you could then use the 2nd pair for a second phone
> > > line....

> > The 568A or B has nothing to do with this.  It doesn't make any
> > difference.



> > > > > Which is the better way to go:  T568B  or  T568A  ???

> > > > 568B is common in the US, but it doesn't matter much...

> > > > > Does it really matter as long as I am consistent with what I choose?  Why
> > > > > the two different standards?

> > > > ...they are electrically identical; just the color coding is
> > > > different. So long as you are consistent, it makes no difference
> > > > whatsoever.

> > > > ---Jim

> > --
> > Please remove NO and SPAM from my email addr to reply.
> > --







> >     Read what the FTC has to say about Junk Email at URL
> >     http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/online/inbox.htm

 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by Stephen W. Jone » Thu, 22 Oct 1998 04:00:00


I read somewhere that to use "A" for residential and "B" for commercial,
the explanation for "A": if you choose to use the rj45 jack for
telephone purposes you could then use the 2nd pair for a second phone
line....


> > Which is the better way to go:  T568B  or  T568A  ???

> 568B is common in the US, but it doesn't matter much...

> > Does it really matter as long as I am consistent with what I choose?  Why
> > the two different standards?

> ...they are electrically identical; just the color coding is
> different. So long as you are consistent, it makes no difference
> whatsoever.

> ---Jim

 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by Stephen W. Jone » Thu, 22 Oct 1998 04:00:00


The color codes are different...


> > I read somewhere that to use "A" for residential and "B" for commercial,
> > the explanation for "A": if you choose to use the rj45 jack for
> > telephone purposes you could then use the 2nd pair for a second phone
> > line....

> The 568A or B has nothing to do with this.  It doesn't make any
> difference.



> > > > Which is the better way to go:  T568B  or  T568A  ???

> > > 568B is common in the US, but it doesn't matter much...

> > > > Does it really matter as long as I am consistent with what I choose?  Why
> > > > the two different standards?

> > > ...they are electrically identical; just the color coding is
> > > different. So long as you are consistent, it makes no difference
> > > whatsoever.

> > > ---Jim

> --
> Please remove NO and SPAM from my email addr to reply.
> --







>     Read what the FTC has to say about Junk Email at URL
>     http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/online/inbox.htm

 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by Jim Sokolof » Thu, 22 Oct 1998 04:00:00



> There is a difference between the two wiring schemes that is
> significant. The T568A scheme is compatible with 1 or 2 pair USOC
> systems (RJ-11 and RJ-14), the T568B is not. This means that if you
> follow the T568A scheme, you could plug RJ-14 plug into a RJ-45 jack and
> connect to both pairs 1 and 2, not just pair 1.

> > The color codes are different [between 568A and 568B] ...

But, since the electrons inside can't see the colors, all that changes
is what color cable goes to what pin. (Meaning, if you wire up all
T568A or T568B, and plug an RJ-11 or RJ-45 into both ends, you get the
same behavior.)

If you wire one end of a run with T568{A|B} and then wire the other
end to some other device by reference solely to the color codes, then
of course you get different behavior.

---Jim

 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by Henry Spenc » Thu, 22 Oct 1998 04:00:00




Quote:>There is a difference between the two wiring schemes that is
>significant. The T568A scheme is compatible with 1 or 2 pair USOC
>systems (RJ-11 and RJ-14), the T568B is not. This means that if you
>follow the T568A scheme, you could plug RJ-14 plug into a RJ-45 jack and
>connect to both pairs 1 and 2, not just pair 1.

Uh, how so?  The two schemes differ *only* in the colors of the insulating
jackets on the wires.  The wiring is identical -- repeat, identical --
repeat, *identical*.  The only way there can possibly be any electrical
difference whatsoever is if somebody goofs and wires the two ends of a
particular cable differently.
--


 
 
 

CAT5 for phone/network

Post by Stephen W. Jone » Fri, 23 Oct 1998 04:00:00


If you follow the proper color coding - the second pair is ORANGE -
T568A - this is normally the 2nd line on a telephone system.


> > There is a difference between the two wiring schemes that is
> > significant. The T568A scheme is compatible with 1 or 2 pair USOC
> > systems (RJ-11 and RJ-14), the T568B is not. This means that if you
> > follow the T568A scheme, you could plug RJ-14 plug into a RJ-45 jack and
> > connect to both pairs 1 and 2, not just pair 1.


> > > The color codes are different [between 568A and 568B] ...

> But, since the electrons inside can't see the colors, all that changes
> is what color cable goes to what pin. (Meaning, if you wire up all
> T568A or T568B, and plug an RJ-11 or RJ-45 into both ends, you get the
> same behavior.)

> If you wire one end of a run with T568{A|B} and then wire the other
> end to some other device by reference solely to the color codes, then
> of course you get different behavior.

> ---Jim