Diff between 10baseT and 10base2 cable??

Diff between 10baseT and 10base2 cable??

Post by Richard Hollingswor » Fri, 12 May 1995 04:00:00



THis has always puzzled me.  If I discount distance as being a problem, and the
cost of a hub is not a problem,  WHY would I ever use 10base2 wire for a net with
it's enherrant (SP??) problems of expense and total loss of net if one WS goes
down?

What are the ADVANTAGES of 10base2 wire???

Thanx much, RH

 
 
 

Diff between 10baseT and 10base2 cable??

Post by Jonathan H » Sun, 14 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:>|THis has always puzzled me.  If I discount distance as being a problem, and the
>|cost of a hub is not a problem,  WHY would I ever use 10base2 wire for a net with
>|it's enherrant (SP??) problems of expense and total loss of net if one WS goes

Well, one reason is because 10BASE-2 was around five years ago and 10BASE-T
wasn't.  Your reasons are certainly valid for a new installation.

Our building lease is up in Feb of '96 but we're moving out a little early.
Two years ago we knew we wouldn't be renewing the lease, so management was
understandably reluctant to replace the 10BASE-2 we put in seven or eight
years ago with Cat 5 UTP.  Of course, this stupid thinnet is giving us
more and more problems as we get closer and closer to moving out.  Ironically,
our new office space has thinnet already installed, but I am 95% sure I will
get approval to have it replaced with a Cat 5 UTP installation.  If not, I'm
going to look for a new job because no one in 1995 should be wasting their
time hunting down problems on a large thinnet network.

Quote:>There's only one application where IMO 10base2 makes sense:
>where you've got a very small number of nodes that are all
>in extremely close proximity, and where clueless users won't

                                         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Amen to that.  I've seen users come up with some very creative
topologies for thinnet networks, given a few T connectors and a
few transceivers with two BNC connectors.  I saw someone make
a network shaped like an "H" once (no repeaters or bridges).  Even our
sys admins don't know the rules; they go over the 30 tap per segment
limit, and I have seen them connect two routed subnets together.

Quote:>Note: a 10base2 segment does NOT go down just because a station
>goes down - but it does if the person attached to that station
>decides to disconnect the network.

But a bad T-connector or bad transceiver will bring down the whole
segment.  I even had a terminator go bad a couple weeks ago and bring
down a segment.



 
 
 

Diff between 10baseT and 10base2 cable??

Post by Aaron Leona » Sun, 14 May 1995 04:00:00



|THis has always puzzled me.  If I discount distance as being a problem, and the
|cost of a hub is not a problem,  WHY would I ever use 10base2 wire for a net with
|it's enherrant (SP??) problems of expense and total loss of net if one WS goes
|down?
|
|What are the ADVANTAGES of 10base2 wire???

There's almost no advantage to 10base2 any more, now that Cat 3
or better UTP is ubiquituous, hubs are down below $200, and 10baseT
jacks are found most everywhere.

There's only one application where IMO 10base2 makes sense:
where you've got a very small number of nodes that are all
in extremely close proximity, and where clueless users won't
be anywhere near it.  There it beats 10baseT for price and
reliability - because you have one less piece of electronics
to go thru.

For example, my home net has a 10base2 segment connecting a VAX,
a PowerMac and a router - 10base2 makes sense here 'cause
I didnt' have to buy a hub and they're all within 10' of
each other.  And I can trust my dog to be too stupid and
clumsy to disconnect the segment.

Note: a 10base2 segment does NOT go down just because a station
goes down - but it does if the person attached to that station
decides to disconnect the network.

Aaron



 
 
 

Diff between 10baseT and 10base2 cable??

Post by Valley Communicatio » Mon, 15 May 1995 04:00:00


: >|THis has always puzzled me.  If I discount distance as being a problem, and the
: >|cost of a hub is not a problem,  WHY would I ever use 10base2 wire for a net with
: >|it's enherrant (SP??) problems of expense and total loss of net if one WS goes

I can think of a couple uses:

-- It's already there.
-- A small workgroup
-- Really weird electrical noise environment.
-- The equipment to be networked is on a rotating platform.
-- Also can be useful as a backbone:

File <-----> File <----> router <-> 10baseT
Server       Server     connected     hub     <========>    Station cable
                           to      
                           the         ^
                       INTERNET!       V

                                    10baseT   <========>    Station cable
                                      hub

|-------inside the Network Room-------------|

Saves hub ports and lets you add without
requiring more patch panel space, etc.


 
 
 

Diff between 10baseT and 10base2 cable??

Post by Evan Gambl » Mon, 15 May 1995 04:00:00


<good stuff deleted>

Quote:> >There's only one application where IMO 10base2 makes sense:
> >where you've got a very small number of nodes that are all
> >in extremely close proximity, and where clueless users won't
>                                          ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
> Amen to that.  I've seen users come up with some very creative
> topologies for thinnet networks, given a few T connectors and a
> few transceivers with two BNC connectors.  I saw someone make
> a network shaped like an "H" once (no repeaters or bridges).  Even our
> sys admins don't know the rules; they go over the 30 tap per segment
> limit, and I have seen them connect two routed subnets together.

Came across an interesting problem recently. Someone had interconnected
a couple of 10BASE-T hubs with thinnet and then closed the loop by
connecting each of them (via UTP) to the same hub on another floor.
Now the connector on one end of the thinnet jumper was flaky and only
made contact intermittently. When it was open, everything worked fine;
when it contacted, the network crashed. Go figure.

> >Note: a 10base2 segment does NOT go down just because a station
> >goes down - but it does if the person attached to that station
> >decides to disconnect the network.

> But a bad T-connector or bad transceiver will bring down the whole
> segment.  I even had a terminator go bad a couple weeks ago and bring
> down a segment.



--
Evan Gamblin
The Halifax Group
903-275 Sparks St
Ottawa, Ontario K1R 7X9 Canada
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
 
 
 

Diff between 10baseT and 10base2 cable??

Post by William Brownl » Wed, 17 May 1995 04:00:00


: THis has always puzzled me.  If I discount distance as being a problem, and the
: cost of a hub is not a problem,  WHY would I ever use 10base2 wire for a net with
: it's enherrant (SP??) problems of expense and total loss of net if one WS goes
: down?

: What are the ADVANTAGES of 10base2 wire???

: Thanx much, RH

Distance.

 
 
 

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-----

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