Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF Room-To-Room

Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF Room-To-Room

Post by Rolin Nelso » Mon, 10 Feb 1997 04:00:00



Hello,

I am a newcomer to the world of home automation.  I stumbled on this new
field by trying to resolve a simple home theater problem.  As a home
theater enthusiast, I have a powered subwoofer with remote-on (comes on
when there is a signal on the RCA patch cable) that I wanted to be off
when I listened to music but on when I watched television.  There were
several options to explore: 1) get a new subwoofer with a wireless
remote control, 2) convert subwoofer to wireless remote control 3) use
some type of device that controlled the power to the unit.  I opted for
option 3 since it was the most cost effective.  I went to Radio Shack
and looked at their remote controlling devices.  They had a key chain
device that remotely controlled a small box through RF signals.
However, that was unacceptable because I wanted a device that was IR
signal controlled, so that I could program my existing remote control to
control the device.  They showed me a full featured device, the 6 in 1
RF Room-To-Room Remote Control (Model 15-1919) with Plug'n Power.  This
unit is composed of two pieces, a programmable remote control and a
transceiver-emmiter controller.  Because the controller acts as an
emmiter, any IR controlled device can be controlled anywhere (within 100
feet) around the house.  The controller can also control up to 8 plug'n
power (X10) devices with the usual features (All Lights ON, All Units
OFF, Unit ON, Unit OFF, Unit Bright, Unit Dim).  Other than the size of
the battery compartment, which makes the remote awkward to hold, it is a
work of art.  The unit has a Punch-Thru (keys not applicable to current
A/V device remain to previous A/V device) feature that can be enabled
and disabled.  The unit can control up to 6 IR A/V devices, plus an A/B
switch for cable or satellite converters.  The remote control emmits
both IR and RF signals.  The IR signals control IR A/V devices, where
as, the RF signals control the plug'n power (X10) devices.  So, far
pretty standard stuff.  What makes this unit stand out are the following
features.  The remote control is truly programmable, that is, after
you've enterred the 3 digit key to control the most common features for
your A/V devices, you can program the not so common features availabe in
your devices.  For example, the remote control does not provide a sleep
key (which it should), you can program any of the keys to be the sleep
key, once you've programmed the sleep code(available from the 800
customer support line) for your A/V device.  One of the great features
is the ability to reprogram keys.  For example if you have two vcrs you
can program any of the device keys to be a second vcr.  This feature is
very powerfull when used in-mode.  I used it to reprogram the volume up
and volume down key for all devices (Cable, TV, VCR, etc.) to the volume
key of the stereo receiver (by default they refer to the TV's volume).
Now, when I am in any mode volume up and down will always refer to the
stereo receiver's volume.  The best and final feature is the ability to
program sequences.  The unit provide two (audio and video) sequence
keys.  I have not tried buy you might be able to create aditional
sequence keys by reprogramming.  As the name states, you can generate
sequences that incorporates IR devices as well as plug'n power devices.
For example, my audio sequence looks like this, <turn-off subwoofer>
<turn-on receiver> <set surround to hall> <set input selector to cd>
<turn-on cd> <set mode to shuffle> <play>, where <task> is replaced by
the appropriate remote control key or feature code.  Also, the keys in
the sequences you generate do not have to be available on your remote,
that is, they can be from the subset of your not so common keys for your
devices.  The unit runs for 70 bucks and does not come with any power
modules.

One problem I have is I would like to add a remote chain key to control
the front door light.  Since I have an apartment, I prefer not to get
one of those full house control units (maybe next year).  I may get a
timer but I would also like to be able to control it manually.  The X10
Active Home kit comes with a remote key chain remote but does not (I
think) provide the room to room IR A/V device remote control like my
Radio Shack remote control.  Does anyone know if another brand key chain
remote will work with the Radio Shack 15-1919 unit, since Radio Shack
does not sell (I think) a key chain remote as a separate product.  Also,
I would prefer a small key chain that is similar to a car alarm.  

Rolin

 
 
 

Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF Room-To-Room

Post by ! » Thu, 13 Feb 1997 04:00:00



     [SNIP]

 RN> One problem I have is I would like to add a remote chain key
 RN> to control the front door light.  Since I have an apartment,
 RN> I prefer not to get one of those full house control units (maybe
 RN> next year).  I may get a timer but I would also like to be able
 RN> to control it manually.  The X10 Active Home kit comes with a
 RN> remote key chain remote but does not (I think) provide the room
 RN> to room IR A/V device remote control like my Radio Shack remote
 RN> control.  Does anyone know if another brand key chain remote
 RN> will work with the Radio Shack 15-1919 unit, since Radio Shack
 RN> does not sell (I think) a key chain remote as a separate product.  
 RN> Also, I would prefer a small key chain that is similar to a
 RN> car alarm.

So what's the problem?  Use an X-10 Powerhose #RC6500 Keychain Remote
(at a cost of about $25) and the appropriate wall switch module ($10-50,
depending) to control the front door light.  Set the housecode of both
units to the same as whatever you're using for the subwoofer's appliance
module (which you didn't mention, but is strongly implied by your
narrative -- DO *NOT* attempt to control that subwoofer with a lamp
module!), and set the unit address of the wall switch module to 1 or 2
(or 5 or 6).  The RadShack 6in1 should be able to send the appropriate
RF code to operate the door light as well as the subwoofer; but if not,
so what?  These really strike me as separate issues.

BTW...  Depending on exactly what transceiver is included with that
RadShack kit, you _may_ be able to get away with buying just the hand-
held portion (#KC674) of the X-10 Keychain Remote system, saving you
maybe $10.

-- Jay T. Blocksom
   Appropriate Technology, Inc.

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Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF Room-To-Room

Post by Les Reev » Fri, 14 Feb 1997 04:00:00



>Hello,
>Now, when I am in any mode volume up and down will always refer to the
>stereo receiver's volume.  The best and final feature is the ability to
>program sequences.  The unit provide two (audio and video) sequence
>keys.  I have not tried buy you might be able to create aditional
>sequence keys by reprogramming.  As the name states, you can generate
>sequences that incorporates IR devices as well as plug'n power devices.
>For example, my audio sequence looks like this, <turn-off subwoofer>
><turn-on receiver> <set surround to hall> <set input selector to cd>
><turn-on cd> <set mode to shuffle> <play>, where <task> is replaced by
>the appropriate remote control key or feature code.  Also, the keys in
>the sequences you generate do not have to be available on your remote,
>that is, they can be from the subset of your not so common keys for your
>devices.

OFA calls this feature "Key Majic".  At one time you could
buy their Universal Remote, call them up and say what is the code
for [obscure key on original remote]?  They would look in a book
and tell you "that's 231".  You could then use the Key Remap feature
(994) to assign 231 to a particular key on your remote.  Or, you
could send it at any time by pressing (not holding) setup, followed
by the 3 digit code.  

The code synthesis feature is alive and well in every OFA
unviversal remote.  Even the $9.95 URC3060 has code synthesis
and 994 key remap.  

What is missing today is their support.  These very powerful
features are there, but you probably won't have much luck calling
OFA/Universal looking for obscure codes, especially with newer
remotes.  They can't provide that sort of support for a $20-$30
product with narrow profit margins.  

You can find all the unassigned, and in many cases, service/setup
codes yourself.  The OFA key majic codes start at 000, and end
at 255.  They repeat at 256-511, 512-767, and 768-999.  Because of the
1024 wrap-around, codes 000-024 can be ambiguous. I consider
them to start at 256 and end at 512, Universal uses 100-356.  It
doesn't much matter where you start, as long as you end +256 higher.

Every possible code your original device could have generated
will be there.  The only major exception is some early RCA
remotes that used two different encoders.  You can emulate
them, but you will need two device codes.

Here are some OFA codes for various devices:

OFA Device-Code     Key majic code     Function
----------------------------------------------------
167 X-10 IR          421              Status Request
167                  359              All Lights Off
167                  454              unit 11
167                  452              unit 12
167                  262              unit 13
167                  260              unit 14                
167                  263              unit 15
167                  261              unit 16

(any Universal/OFA that has code 167 X-10 can control all
16 units and issue status req/All Lights Off through an IR-543
IR/RF gateway or the R/S 15-1919 6-1 RF gateway)

----------------------------------------------------------------

460 S/A DMX          021              View-Same as pressing DJ on DJ rem
460 Audio            911              Shift (normally avail only at unit)
460 terminal         039              Store
460                  165              Scan
460                  164              ch+

sh ch-up invokes set-up mode
ch-up enables digital out
sh starts carrier search
     (at next power on)
scan store runs real-time bit error test
scan Id reads sig level
preset ch+ carrier freq
preset ch- carrier group

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:>One problem I have is I would like to add a remote chain key to control
>the front door light.  Since I have an apartment, I prefer not to get
>one of those full house control units (maybe next year).  I may get a
>timer but I would also like to be able to control it manually.  The X10
>Active Home kit comes with a remote key chain remote but does not (I
>think) provide the room to room IR A/V device remote control like my
>Radio Shack remote control.  Does anyone know if another brand key chain
>remote will work with the Radio Shack 15-1919 unit, since Radio Shack
>does not sell (I think) a key chain remote as a separate product.  Also,
>I would prefer a small key chain that is similar to a car alarm.  

The 6-1 works with the keychain transmitter just fine.  It responds
to all the X-10 RF xmitters, pretty much identically to the 751.

Not everyone bundles the keychain xmitter with the 751.  Check with
Home Control Systems.  I think they sell the keychain by itself.


-- P O Box 7807 Atlanta GA 30357  --

 
 
 

Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF Room-To-Room

Post by Les Reeve » Sun, 16 Feb 1997 04:00:00



> Hi Les,

> I'm very interested in your recent posting re the Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF
> Room-To-Room remote controller.  Were there previous posts that I missed,
> and/or do you know where I can find more info.

The 6-1 is a bit of sleeper.  It is a really remarkable integration
of RF, X-10, and OFA's massive IR control expertise.  Of all the
well intentioned attempts at putting "it all" in a single handheld,
this is the only product that delivers.  Six devices, plus X-10 with
a dedicated device key, make the non-RF capable 6-1 (RS 15-1918) easily
the best integrated remote, period.   It is identical to the handheld
Ir /RF handheld in the 15-1919, save for the RF output.  The IR code
library shipped with these units is huge.  Both have OFA's fone-up
code update feature, so you are covered for just about anything
you might add in the future.   The units support IR carriers from
base-band to 100 kHz, so they should be able to handle the
unknown for several years.

The 1918 has a button which toggles LED backlighting on or off.
(The 6-1 RF has no backlight).  This keyboard's feel and layout
make the light-up button virtually unneeded.  I rarely look at the
keyboard.  About the only time I actually LOOK at the handheld
is when I have grabbed the 1918 instead of the 1919 (yes, I have
one of each) by mistake and try to use it from the far end of the
house.  

Universal / OFA has really done well, IMHO.  

It appears that this 6-1 may be exclusive to Radio Shack for
a while. The new 6-1 from X-10 differs quite a bit from the RS 6-1.

The most recent Home Automation System (800.762.7846)
catalog has the new X-10 6 in 1 RF+Ir.  They sell it stand-alone for
$29, or bundled with an RF gateway for $59.   This is the same
handheld bundled with AcitiveHome.  The handheld is X-10 model UR 19A.

From what I can tell based on sparce specs, this new 6-1 is pretty
lame compared to the RS 6-1.  OTOH,  If you have an Active home system,
new 6-1 gives you an additional handheld at $30 per unit.

The main differences are:

The X-10 Ir code (used by venerable IR 543
and R/S 15-1919, aka code 167) are not in this device.  For X-10
control it sends X-10 RF only.  In other words, pointing it at
an IR 543 will do nothing.  This assumption is based on product
data sheets.   If it *does* generate  the X-10 Ir, please let me
know.  

It has five, not six devices available.  

It has approximately eight fewer device function keys than the
R/S 6-1.  This is the same problem as every other OFA product,
except for the RS 6-1.   That is not enough buttons.  Did
I mention it's kinda ugly?

Unless you have now or plan to purchase Activehome, this
thing appears to be much less bang for the buck than the
RS 6-1's.

Quote:> I am especially interested
> in how suitable the unit is for controlling a Sony receiver and Sony CD
> changer.

The Sony codes are well supported.   OFA even has duplicated, sequential
table entries that work with Sony's "VCR1 /VCR2" type remotes.
The Sony CD changer may require some Key Majic using the 994 code.


--  P.O. Box 7807, Atlanta, GA 30357        404.881.8279       --

 
 
 

Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF Room-To-Room

Post by Rolin Nelso » Mon, 17 Feb 1997 04:00:00




> > Hi Les,

> > I'm very interested in your recent posting re the Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF
> > Room-To-Room remote controller.  Were there previous posts that I missed,
> > and/or do you know where I can find more info.

> The 6-1 is a bit of sleeper.  It is a really remarkable integration
> of RF, X-10, and OFA's massive IR control expertise.  Of all the
> well intentioned attempts at putting "it all" in a single handheld,
> this is the only product that delivers.  Six devices, plus X-10 with
> a dedicated device key, make the non-RF capable 6-1 (RS 15-1918) easily
> the best integrated remote, period.   It is identical to the handheld
> Ir /RF handheld in the 15-1919, save for the RF output.  The IR code
> library shipped with these units is huge.  Both have OFA's fone-up
> code update feature, so you are covered for just about anything
> you might add in the future.   The units support IR carriers from
> base-band to 100 kHz, so they should be able to handle the
> unknown for several years.

> The 1918 has a button which toggles LED backlighting on or off.
> (The 6-1 RF has no backlight).  This keyboard's feel and layout
> make the light-up button virtually unneeded.  I rarely look at the
> keyboard.  About the only time I actually LOOK at the handheld
> is when I have grabbed the 1918 instead of the 1919 (yes, I have
> one of each) by mistake and try to use it from the far end of the
> house.

> Universal / OFA has really done well, IMHO.

> It appears that this 6-1 may be exclusive to Radio Shack for
> a while. The new 6-1 from X-10 differs quite a bit from the RS 6-1.

> The most recent Home Automation System (800.762.7846)
> catalog has the new X-10 6 in 1 RF+Ir.  They sell it stand-alone for
> $29, or bundled with an RF gateway for $59.   This is the same
> handheld bundled with AcitiveHome.  The handheld is X-10 model UR 19A.

> From what I can tell based on sparce specs, this new 6-1 is pretty
> lame compared to the RS 6-1.  OTOH,  If you have an Active home system,
> new 6-1 gives you an additional handheld at $30 per unit.

> The main differences are:

> The X-10 Ir code (used by venerable IR 543
> and R/S 15-1919, aka code 167) are not in this device.  For X-10
> control it sends X-10 RF only.  In other words, pointing it at
> an IR 543 will do nothing.  This assumption is based on product
> data sheets.   If it *does* generate  the X-10 Ir, please let me
> know.

> It has five, not six devices available.

> It has approximately eight fewer device function keys than the
> R/S 6-1.  This is the same problem as every other OFA product,
> except for the RS 6-1.   That is not enough buttons.  Did
> I mention it's kinda ugly?

> Unless you have now or plan to purchase Activehome, this
> thing appears to be much less bang for the buck than the
> RS 6-1's.

> > I am especially interested
> > in how suitable the unit is for controlling a Sony receiver and Sony CD
> > changer.

> The Sony codes are well supported.   OFA even has duplicated, sequential
> table entries that work with Sony's "VCR1 /VCR2" type remotes.
> The Sony CD changer may require some Key Majic using the 994 code.


> --  P.O. Box 7807, Atlanta, GA 30357        404.881.8279       --

Les,

Thanks very much for your thourough reply.  In your original response
you stated that any X-10 keychain remote will work with my RS 15-1919,
then how exactly is a remote tied to a specific unit.  Or is it the case
that all (non-security) key chain remotes operate at the same frequency.
Therefore, potentially, my nextdoor neighbor's key chain remote may
turn  on or off my units.  I know this is propably not the case, so
please explain.

Thanks,
Rolin

 
 
 

Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF Room-To-Room

Post by Richard Chandl » Tue, 18 Feb 1997 04:00:00




Quote:>The X-10 Ir code (used by venerable IR 543
>and R/S 15-1919, aka code 167) are not in this device.  For X-10
>control it sends X-10 RF only.  In other words, pointing it at
>an IR 543 will do nothing.  This assumption is based on product
>data sheets.   If it *does* generate  the X-10 Ir, please let me
>know.  

Yes, it can be configured to work with the IR gateway instead of the RF
one.
--
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off the bat if you're an idiot! -- Me
http://www.teleport.com/~mauser/ Gallery Web Page
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Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF Room-To-Room

Post by Rolin Nelso » Wed, 19 Feb 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

> So what's the problem?  Use an X-10 Powerhose #RC6500 Keychain Remote
> (at a cost of about $25) and the appropriate wall switch module ($10-50,
> depending) to control the front door light.  Set the housecode of both

Since I am new to all this X10 stuff, correct me if I am wrong.  You're
saying that any X10 compliant RF remote (such as a key chain) will work
with any X10 RF receiver.  So, any RF receiver in the local proximity
(100 feet) is capable of receiving signals from any X10 RF emitters.
All that is necessary is for the housecode of the remote and receiver be
set to the same.
If that is the case, you must be careful in the housecodes you chose, so
that they don't interfere with neighbors.

Correct me if I am wrong.
Rolin

 
 
 

Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF Room-To-Room

Post by g.. » Wed, 19 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Quote:> > > I'm very interested in your recent posting re the Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF
> > > Room-To-Room remote controller.  Were there previous posts that I missed,
> > > and/or do you know where I can find more info.

> > The 6-1 is a bit of sleeper.  It is a really remarkable integration
> > of RF, X-10, and OFA's massive IR control expertise.  Of all the
> > well intentioned attempts at putting "it all" in a single handheld,
> > this is the only product that delivers.  Six devices, plus X-10 with
> > a dedicated device key, make the non-RF capable 6-1 (RS 15-1918) easily
> > the best integrated remote, period.   It is identical to the handheld
> > Ir /RF handheld in the 15-1919, save for the RF output.  The IR code
> > library shipped with these units is huge.  Both have OFA's fone-up
> > code update feature, so you are covered for just about anything
> > you might add in the future.   The units support IR carriers from
> > base-band to 100 kHz, so they should be able to handle the
> > unknown for several years.

I noticed the 1919 when the '97 catalog came out.  from the description
it sounds
like it transmits rf to a base unit that then converts it to ir.  Your
description sounds like it only transmits rf for x-10 and it does not
come with/need a base unit.  Short of going to an RS and checking this
out, perhaps you could clarify, and also how is rf range?  

On the programming issue, can individual keys be programmed?  I always
find that these "pre-programmed" remotes have some missing key(s).
Those with "magic" solve the problem for missing keys (like the "sleep"
function on the new X-10 unit) but you can't control different devices
on the same "device" as you can on a learning remote.

Quote:> > From what I can tell based on sparce specs, this new 6-1 is pretty
> > lame compared to the RS 6-1.  OTOH,  If you have an Active home system,
> > new 6-1 gives you an additional handheld at $30 per unit.

correct

Quote:> > The X-10 Ir code (used by venerable IR 543
> > and R/S 15-1919, aka code 167) are not in this device.  For X-10
> > control it sends X-10 RF only.  In other words, pointing it at
> > an IR 543 will do nothing.  This assumption is based on product
> > data sheets.   If it *does* generate  the X-10 Ir, please let me
> > know.

The manual that comes with it says it can generate either ir or rf for
x-10.  I have found that the range is short and even in the same room it
is not reliable -- it may take several tries...  

all in all, the x-10 6 in 1 will never become a usable single remote for
me -- something me old rs15-1902 learning remote comes closest to for
most normal daily use!  (I guess since I can't remember what too many
reprogrammed keys do the little rs 1902 keeps it simple enought to
remember what all the keys do even after months of non-use of some).
btw, has anyone tried a Newton PDA as a remote?  these can be had for
less than marantz wizzy new remote...

 
 
 

Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF Room-To-Room

Post by ! » Sat, 22 Feb 1997 04:00:00




 RN> > So what's the problem?  Use an X-10 Powerhose #RC6500 Keychain
 RN> > Remote (at a cost of about $25) and the appropriate wall switch
 RN> > module ($10-50, depending) to control the front door light.  Set
 RN> > the housecode of both...
 RN>
 RN> Since I am new to all this X10 stuff, correct me if I am wrong.
 RN> You're saying that any X10 compliant RF remote (such as a key
 RN> chain) will work with any X10 RF receiver.  So, any RF receiver in
 RN> the local proximity (100 feet) is capable of receiving signals from
 RN> any X10 RF emitters. All that is necessary is for the housecode of
 RN> the remote and receiver be set to the same.

Well, I can't be sure of the "any" part, as I haven't used all the
combinations -- and I learned long ago that sweeping generalizations can
get one in trouble in a large huury.  ;-)

But in this case, it's a moot point.  As I said in that post you quoted,
_depending_ on which RF base was included in that RadShack kit, you
_may_ be able to get away with just the keychain-remote part (KC674) of
the RC6500 (which is really nothing more than a KC674 bundled with a
TM751 in the same package).  IOW, it's just a matter of saving about
$10 on redundant hardware, or not.

 RN> If that is the case, you must be careful in the housecodes you
 RN> chose, so that they don't interfere with neighbors.

Well, that's true regardless of the RF situation, but not for the reason
you're probably thinking of.  Remember, in all probability, at least
several of your neighbors are running off the same power company
transformer tap that you are.  So plain old ordinary powerline X-10
signals _can_ travel from house to house.  But in practice, it's really
not that much of a problem -- for one thing, X-10 is still not all that
popular with the general public; so the odds are, your immediate
neighbors don't have any X-10 stuff installed for you to worry about! If
you do find yourself in that situation, there are whole-house
blocker/couplers available for just this reason.

Now, on the RF side, the RF transmitter (in this case, the KC674; but it
could also be the 8/16-unit RT504) is talking a completely different
language ("RF-ese", if you will) _solely_ to the transceiver module (the
TM751 in this case).  The transceiver then translates that into a
"standard" X-10 command, and places it on the powerline.  At that point,
any appropriately-addressed X-10 module (such as the wall switch
controlling that front-door lamp) in the house should be able to respond
to the command.  As far as the RF itself interfering with the
neighbors... in general, I wouldn't worry about it.  That KC674 doesn't
have a lot of range; and even if your next-door neighbor did happen to
also have X-10 RF stuff, you could just agree to use different
housecodes for any RF-controlled items -- or, you could get your jollies
turning his lights on and off at 3 AM.  ;-)

-- Jay T. Blocksom
   Appropriate Technology, Inc.

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Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF Room-To-Room

Post by Robert H. Merrima » Tue, 25 Feb 1997 04:00:00


This is correct.  Any X-10 RF receiver will receive from any X-10 RF
transmitter.  In my house, I have three key chain remotes (two Radio
Shack & one Powerhouse), two 8 channel handheld remotes (Stanley), two
four button wall mount remote transmitters (Leviton) and the UR19A
IR/RF transmitter.  All work off a single RF receiver.  Actually, they
all work off one of the receivers that came with one of the key chain
since, rather surprisingly, it seemed to be the most sensitive of the
bunch.

Accordingly, you should avoid using the same house code as your neighbors.
But there are 16 house codes (A-P) so that shouldn't be too dificult.  You
only need to be concerned with neighbors that are within about 150 feet of
your house.  So you aren't competing with that many.

Not only must you be careful not to use a house code that your next door
neighbor uses, but you must also not put two X-10 RF receivers on the same
house code in your own house.  This will result in collisions on the AC
line, i.e. the same X-10 command retransmitted by two different receivers
confusing the responders.  If you must use two receivers, use two 8 channel
receivers, one set on 1-8 and the other set on 9-16.  Do this, for example,
if your house is so large that one receiver cannot cover the entire house.
You could also use two 16 channel receivers on different house codes but
then it would be a little trickier to get them to control the same devices.
You would have to use macros.

Regards,
Bob
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Quote:

> Since I am new to all this X10 stuff, correct me if I am wrong.  You're
> saying that any X10 compliant RF remote (such as a key chain) will work
> with any X10 RF receiver.  So, any RF receiver in the local proximity
> (100 feet) is capable of receiving signals from any X10 RF emitters.
> All that is necessary is for the housecode of the remote and receiver be
> set to the same.
> If that is the case, you must be careful in the housecodes you chose, so
> that they don't interfere with neighbors.

> Correct me if I am wrong.
> Rolin

 
 
 

Radio Shack 6 in 1 RF Room-To-Room

Post by Tom Gerac » Wed, 12 Mar 1997 04:00:00




Quote:

> The 6-1 is a bit of sleeper.  It is a really remarkable integration
> of RF, X-10, and OFA's massive IR control expertise.  Of all the
> well intentioned attempts at putting "it all" in a single handheld,
> this is the only product that delivers.  Six devices, plus X-10 with
> a dedicated device key, make the non-RF capable 6-1 (RS 15-1918) easily
> the best integrated remote, period.   It is identical to the handheld
> Ir /RF handheld in the 15-1919, save for the RF output.  The IR code

Les and others -

The feature that I look for in a multiple-device remote is simply stated
as:

  Do you have to press the function key (TV, VCR) EACH TIME you send
  a command, or does the remote REMEMBER the last function key
  pressed forever until you press a new one?

The RS remote 15-1919 sounds like the X-10 6-1/RF that I have, but better,
as you state.  Tell me --- does the RS remote have the feature that I'm
looking for?

Thanks in advance.

Tom

 
 
 

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