Serial speeds

Serial speeds

Post by Chris's Mai » Tue, 17 Feb 1998 04:00:00



If the fastest win95 serial ports can be set at is 115000, and a bonded isdn
is running at 128000, then you are not getting all you could. right?

Is there an upgrade to increase the speed of the ser\ial ports.


 
 
 

Serial speeds

Post by Dana Goul » Wed, 18 Feb 1998 04:00:00




Quote:> If the fastest win95 serial ports can be set at is 115000,
> and a bonded isdn is running at 128000, then you are not
> getting all you could. right?

> Is there an upgrade to increase the speed of the ser\ial ports.

The usual suspects:

    http://www.byterunner.com/
    http://www.connecttech.com/
    http://www.lavalink.com/
    http://www.turbocom.com/

PS. It's bundled, not bonded. We've shot folks for less. :-)

--
Dana Gould
To send email, remove NOSPAM from my return address.


 
 
 

Serial speeds

Post by Hiran Chaudhur » Wed, 18 Feb 1998 04:00:00


Hi, Dana.

Can you explain to me the difference between bundling and bonding? I have
heard both words in similar context so I assumed they are the same...

Hiran





> > If the fastest win95 serial ports can be set at is 115000,
> > and a bonded isdn is running at 128000, then you are not
> > getting all you could. right?

> > Is there an upgrade to increase the speed of the ser\ial ports.

> The usual suspects:

> PS. It's bundled, not bonded. We've shot folks for less. :-)

> --
> Dana Gould
> To send email, remove NOSPAM from my return address.


 
 
 

Serial speeds

Post by Dana Goul » Wed, 18 Feb 1998 04:00:00




Quote:> Hi, Dana.

> Can you explain to me the difference between bundling and
> bonding? I have heard both words in similar context so I
> assumed they are the same...

> Hiran

There are people in this group better able to answer that question than me,
but that's never stopped me before. :-)

My understanding is that bonding is done at the physical layer, bytes are
sent over alternate B-channels. Bundling, also called MP or MLPPP
(Multilink PPP), is done at the IP layer, packets are sent over alternate
B-channels.

Although the overall throughput is the same, bonding is preferred for
things like videoconferencing and bundling is preferred for everything
else.

--
Dana Gould
To send email, remove NOSPAM from my return address.

 
 
 

Serial speeds

Post by Peter John Harriso » Wed, 18 Feb 1998 04:00:00


"Bundling" is a Multilink PPP term used to describe the collection of
communications links into a single logical connection.  "Bonding" is the
term used by another protocol, V.120, to describe the same thing.

O.K., so that's a confusing statement unless you have a experience with
telecommunications, a protocol handbook or crystal ball.  Here's a basic
description of  what "Multilink PPP" and "V.120" are.

Most ISPs and network-to-network links use a protocol, the Point-to-Point
Protocol (PPP) to send network traffic from one location to another.  If
you're dialing into MSN or AOL or Earthlink or almost any other ISP, you are
using PPP to send and receive Internet traffic over your modem.

PPP works over a single telecommunications link -- like a standard modem or
a "1B" ISDN connection.  You can't use standard PPP to run two modems or two
ISDN B channels at the same time without some sort of controlling logic.
Multilink PPP ("MP" for short) is a communications protocol that "bundles"
two or more PPP links (ISDN, analog modem, even multiple radio channels)
into a single logical communications link, and "Bundle" is the technical
term used to describe the collection of links being combined.

The V.120 protocol is a protocol that does the same kind of thing, but it is
specific to ISDN and it handles the sending and receiving of data
differently.

-----

As for the serial ports question, yes, there are upgrades available that
will boost your system's serial port speed to 230Kbps and higher.  What you
need to look for is a serial port card that uses the "16660" or 16750
Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter (UART) chip.  Such cards are
available from a number of vendors; my current favorite is the LAVA PCI card
(see http://www.lavalink.com/ ).

-----

To learn more about ISDN, Cable Modems, and other high-speed communications
technology come visit the Computing Central Bandwidth Forum
 http://ComputingCentral.com/forums/bandwidth/ ) or visit our Monday Night
Bandwidth Chat, 7-8 PM Pacific Time at
http://ComputingCentral.com/forums/bandwidth/chat/ .

-- Peter
Peter John Harrison
Computing Central Forum Manager, *Bandwidth Forum*
For information on ISDN, Cable Modems, Satellite Data, and ADSL,
visit the Computing Central *Bandwidth Forum* at
http://computingcentral.com/forums/bandwidth/
Forum Manager, *Peter's Bandwidth Frontier*
http://computingcentral.com/forums/bandwidth/

>Hi, Dana.

>Can you explain to me the difference between bundling and bonding? I have
>heard both words in similar context so I assumed they are the same...

>Hiran





>> > If the fastest win95 serial ports can be set at is 115000,
>> > and a bonded isdn is running at 128000, then you are not
>> > getting all you could. right?

>> > Is there an upgrade to increase the speed of the ser\ial ports.

>> The usual suspects:

>> PS. It's bundled, not bonded. We've shot folks for less. :-)

>> --
>> Dana Gould
>> To send email, remove NOSPAM from my return address.


 
 
 

Serial speeds

Post by Dana Goul » Thu, 19 Feb 1998 04:00:00




Quote:

> There are people in this group better able to answer
> that question than me, but that's never stopped me before. :-)

> My understanding is that bonding is done at the physical
> layer, bytes are sent over alternate B-channels. Bundling,
> also called MP or MLPPP (Multilink PPP), is done at the
> IP layer, packets are sent over alternate B-channels.

Just thought someone might like a pointer to the appropriate RFC

    http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1717.html  The PPP Multilink Protocol (AKA
bundling)

Quote:> Although the overall throughput is the same, bonding is
> preferred for things like videoconferencing and bundling
> is preferred for everything else.

And I just wanted to clarify this statement a little (that'll teach me to
post at 7:00 in the morning :-)

Although the overall throughput is the same, bonding seems to be more
suited for circuit-switched, streaming protocols like videoconferencing and
bundling seems to be more suited for packet-switched protocols like TCP/IP.

Aren't you glad you asked?

--
Dana Gould
To send email, remove NOSPAM from my return address.

 
 
 

Serial speeds

Post by Hiran Chaudhur » Thu, 19 Feb 1998 04:00:00


Thank you both for the answers.

I understand now that bonding _could_ be used with terminal programs like
HyperTerminal where bundling is used for PPP.

Hiran





> > There are people in this group better able to answer
> > that question than me, but that's never stopped me before. :-)

> > My understanding is that bonding is done at the physical
> > layer, bytes are sent over alternate B-channels. Bundling,
> > also called MP or MLPPP (Multilink PPP), is done at the
> > IP layer, packets are sent over alternate B-channels.

> Just thought someone might like a pointer to the appropriate RFC

>     http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1717.html  The PPP Multilink Protocol
(AKA
> bundling)

> > Although the overall throughput is the same, bonding is
> > preferred for things like videoconferencing and bundling
> > is preferred for everything else.

> And I just wanted to clarify this statement a little (that'll teach me to
> post at 7:00 in the morning :-)

> Although the overall throughput is the same, bonding seems to be more
> suited for circuit-switched, streaming protocols like videoconferencing
and
> bundling seems to be more suited for packet-switched protocols like
TCP/IP.

> Aren't you glad you asked?

> --
> Dana Gould
> To send email, remove NOSPAM from my return address.


 
 
 

Serial speeds

Post by Mark » Thu, 19 Feb 1998 04:00:00


Correct... assuming you're running an external TA via a serial port.
There are third-party serial cards with 16650 UARTS that will easily
accomodate 128,000 -- around $80.  However, unless you're doing a lot
of heavy file downloading you may not really need one.

On Mon, 16 Feb 1998 20:17:02 -0600, "Chris's Mail"


>If the fastest win95 serial ports can be set at is 115000, and a bonded isdn
>is running at 128000, then you are not getting all you could. right?

>Is there an upgrade to increase the speed of the ser\ial ports.



 
 
 

Serial speeds

Post by Avi Weis » Sat, 21 Feb 1998 04:00:00


Hi!
You are loosing twice in speed of the UART16550, once is is 115000 in
stead of 128000, second it is mostly A-synchcronics (meaning that to
every byte you add two bits calling Start/Stop bits which is wasted for
ISDN connection) and get 20% less throughput. The third is that the
conversion of A-Sync to Sync in both sides of the connection is reducing
the throughput with 30% of the speed. So, the better way is to upgrade
the UART chip (as written in other letter here).
Avi


> If the fastest win95 serial ports can be set at is 115000, and a bonded isdn
> is running at 128000, then you are not getting all you could. right?

> Is there an upgrade to increase the speed of the ser\ial ports.



--
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!! Mr. ISDN                        !!
!! Avi Weiss (M.Sc.)               !!  
!! Professional Reporter           !!
!! Communication Expert            !!
!! ISDN & Internet adviser         !!
!! Tel/Fax: 972-4-9989431          !!
!! Cellcom: 052-660805             !!
!! ISDN: 972-4-9905005             !!
!! H. Address:                     !!
!! 41A Ramim St., Karmiel,21861.   !!
!! ISRAEL                          !!
!!                                 !!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
******************************************






******************************************
* http://www.netvision.net.il/php/aweiss *
******************************************
 
 
 

Serial speeds

Post by Laurence V. Mar » Fri, 27 Feb 1998 04:00:00



Quote:>There are people in this group better able to answer that question than me,
>but that's never stopped me before. :-)

Not too bad!

Quote:>My understanding is that bonding is done at the physical layer, bytes are
>sent over alternate B-channels. Bundling, also called MP or MLPPP
>(Multilink PPP), is done at the IP layer, packets are sent over alternate
>B-channels.

Not always alternate channels for MP.  You send the packet on the channel with
the least full queue.  This slightly more complicated scheme works better in
at least two cases:
1) Non-Homgeneous links; e.g., one link is a Bell 103J modem (300 bps) and the
   other is 56Kbps.
2) The pathological situation of alternating maximum-length and minimum-length
   packets.

Quote:

>Although the overall throughput is the same, bonding is preferred for
>things like videoconferencing and bundling is preferred for everything
>else.

And the reason is that BONDING (All caps, it's an acronym for something close
to Bandwidth ON Demand INdustry Group) has much lower latency.  Video
conferences, like voice calls, get difficult with a lot of delay.

Bundling was chosen for data because you can do it with softwaret, using
existing hardware.  This isn't a consideration for small TAs but was
significant for workstations and remote access servers at the time.

>--
>Dana Gould
>To send email, remove NOSPAM from my return address.


Laurence V. Marks
IBM Corp. - Research Triangle Park, NC
 
 
 

Serial speeds

Post by Dana Goul » Sat, 28 Feb 1998 04:00:00





writes:
> > My understanding is that bonding is done at the physical
> > layer, bytes are sent over alternate B-channels. Bundling,
> > also called MP or MLPPP (Multilink PPP), is done at the
> > IP layer, packets are sent over alternate B-channels.
> Not always alternate channels for MP.  You send the packet
> on the channel with the least full queue.  This slightly
> more complicated scheme works better in at least two cases:
> 1) Non-Homgeneous links; e.g., one link is a Bell 103J
>    modem (300 bps) and the other is 56Kbps.
> 2) The pathological situation of alternating maximum-length
>    and minimum-length packets.

Thanks for the clarification!

I was thinking of the example of non-homogeneous links while I was writing
that, but I didn't want to get too confusing. Perhaps I should have noted
that that was a simplified explanation, but it was 7AM and I hadn't had my
coffee yet. :-)

Quote:> > Although the overall throughput is the same, bonding is
> > preferred for things like videoconferencing and bundling
> > is preferred for everything else.

> And the reason is that BONDING (All caps, it's an acronym
> for something close to Bandwidth ON Demand INdustry Group)
> has much lower latency.  Video conferences, like voice calls,
> get difficult with a lot of delay.

Mmm, low and 'fixed' latency and little or no 'jitter' between data
streams.

Quote:> Bundling was chosen for data because you can do it with
> software, using existing hardware.  This isn't a consideration
> for small TAs but was significant for workstations and remote
> access servers at the time.

Well, my post was a little unclear at this point, I tried to clear it up a
bit in a subsequent post. Chalk it up to the early hour and lack of
caffine.

I plan on downloading the BONDING protocol spec's RSN so I'll have some
idea of what I'm talking about in the future. :-)

Thanks again!

--
Dana Gould
To send email, remove NOSPAM from my return address.

 
 
 

1. 230.4 Serial Speed doesnt work, Adtran 3000+16C950 serial ports

Hopeing some ISDN guru can help me out.

I have a Adtran 3000 express and a highspeed 16C950 serial board. Trying to
use the 230.4 serial option on the Adtran using win2k.
115.2 works fine, but would like to bump it up for the extra speed increase
on bonded channels.

1. Win2k port set at 230.4
2. Modem set at 230.4K
3. Adtran switch 1 set up, (off) for 230.4K modem.

Open hyperterm, and the TD light flickers if I hold down the A key, but no
response from adtran isdn unit.

Any ideas? I flip both modem/port back to 115.2 and it works fine. Will call
Adtran next week, closed on weekends. :(

-Brook Harty

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