Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

Post by Ted Johnsto » Sun, 19 May 2002 10:55:13



Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

By Brier Dudley
Seattle Times technology reporter

Microsoft has long downplayed speculation that it plans to make the Xbox
more than just a video-game console.

But top executives have let it slip that they indeed have broader ambitions
for the newly priced $199 device.

In recent speeches around the country, Chairman Bill Gates and Chief
Executive Steve Ballmer talked about plans to add television controls to the
Xbox and develop a device combining the features of a game console,
computer, TV set-top box and music player.

The disclosures shed light on Microsoft's ambitions for the
home-entertainment market and its vision for tomorrow's home computer. They
may also be significant in light of the antitrust case, where a key issue is
whether Microsoft will use its monopoly on PC operating systems to gain an
unfair advantage in emerging markets such as set-top boxes, media players
and services delivered over the Internet.

Gates and Ballmer disclosed their plans shortly before the game industry's
biggest trade show, the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles next
week.

Microsoft is expected to announce at the show its plans for an online Xbox
game service. But a company strategist said it won't discuss broader plans
for the console because it's trying to build its reputation among developers
who may not want to write games for a multipurpose device.

But Gates and Ballmer apparently cannot hide their enthusiasm for the
potential of an expanded Xbox, which could help Microsoft extend its
presence in homes.

Gates and Ballmer may also see Xbox as a vehicle to deliver Microsoft TV
set-top box software.

"It's a lot of fun to be doing a product like that, but it's also a product
that, because of the rich capabilities, will really kind of surprise people
how that fits into the home network,'' Gates was quoted in a transcript of
an April 25 discussion at Stanford University.

"Because it's a full-blown computer with a disk, we'll be able to let people
have music and photos and TV guide, and as you're watching TV, if there's a
sports score that's interesting to you, you have that appear exactly the way
you want it ... ."

Two weeks later, the company said it had developed an electronic TV guide
similar to those used by cable-TV companies.

The Xbox, launched Nov. 15, is basically a Windows-based PC with a hard disk
that could enable it to record and play television shows. It also has a disc
player that can handle music CDs and DVDs and built-in components for
broadband Internet connections.

Steven Guggenheimer, senior director of consumer strategy at Microsoft,
declined to discuss new features planned for the Xbox. He downplayed the
disclosures, saying the company is focused on the Xbox's * potential
while the executives are talking about the future. "In general, Bill and
Steve get very enthusiastic about these technologies,'' he said. "They like
to talk about the possibilities."

Ballmer said the company is working on a multifunction device that could be
sold at low cost and prove attractive to households that may not see the
value of a computer. His remarks came May 11 in New York at the Blacks in
Technology Summit.

" ... There will be a day in the next five, six, seven years when you'll be
able to buy a device ... for maybe $500 or $600 that's your TV, that's your
CD player, your DVD player, it's your video-game player, it's your PC, it's
your Internet access device and it's your TV tuner all in one ... ,'' he
said.

With music, movies and photos increasingly digital, many companies are
trying to develop devices combining features of computers, set-top boxes and
music systems and Internet access.

In January, Prudential analyst Hans Mosesmann reported Microsoft was
developing "HomeStation," an Xbox-based device that would allow users to
record television shows, play games, surf the Web and do e-mail. Microsoft
declined to discuss the report.

One reason for the silence may be the antitrust case. Wednesday, the judge
overseeing the case asked lawyers for more information about how the company
could threaten emerging markets for set-top boxes and services delivered
over the Internet.

States pursuing the case argue that new devices and services may evolve into
platforms that compete with Microsoft PC platform if the company's
anti-competitive business practices are limited.

Company spokesman Jim Desler said the case is about Microsoft's monopoly on
the PC operating-system market, and it has no such monopoly on other
markets.

Copyright ? 2002 The Seattle Times Company

 
 
 

Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

Post by ProjectBlackcom » Sun, 19 May 2002 11:00:42



Quote:> Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

Excellent news, thanks for posting.

 
 
 

Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

Post by ProjectBlackcom » Sun, 19 May 2002 11:00:43



Quote:> Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

Excellent news, thanks for posting.
 
 
 

Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

Post by DavidG1 » Sun, 19 May 2002 11:45:03



Quote:> Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

> By Brier Dudley
> Seattle Times technology reporter

> Microsoft has long downplayed speculation that it plans to make the Xbox
> more than just a video-game console.

> But top executives have let it slip that they indeed have broader
ambitions
> for the newly priced $199 device.

> In recent speeches around the country, Chairman Bill Gates and Chief
> Executive Steve Ballmer talked about plans to add television controls to
the
> Xbox and develop a device combining the features of a game console,
> computer, TV set-top box and music player.

Uhg.. I hate to see M$ take something as cool as xbox and * it up by
making it a glorified tivo.
 
 
 

Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

Post by Virtuou » Sun, 19 May 2002 12:29:15


Quote:> " ... There will be a day in the next five, six, seven years when you'll
be
> able to buy a device ... for maybe $500 or $600 that's your TV, that's
your
> CD player, your DVD player, it's your video-game player, it's your PC,
it's
> your Internet access device and it's your TV tuner all in one ... ,'' he
> said.

Five years is a lifetime in the high tech world. Not even Gates and Ballmer
know what MS will do in 5-7 years. Originally Sony wanted the PS2 to serve
as a multipurpose device. It now appears that Sony has postponed its
ambitions until the PS3.
 
 
 

Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

Post by xslack » Sun, 19 May 2002 15:32:59


Thanks for the reprint, this is always good to see.

FWIW this is only part of what can happen.
It is actually going to be a lot more interesting than what the
ultra-tame Seattle Times can see and put in print.

The details may change over the next few years, but it will
be pretty great for us, make no mistake about it.

I pity da foo that's not optimistic too.

_xslacks


Quote:> Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

> By Brier Dudley
> Seattle Times technology reporter

> Microsoft has long downplayed speculation that it plans to make the Xbox
> more than just a video-game console.

> But top executives have let it slip that they indeed have broader
ambitions
> for the newly priced $199 device.

> In recent speeches around the country, Chairman Bill Gates and Chief
> Executive Steve Ballmer talked about plans to add television controls to
the
> Xbox and develop a device combining the features of a game console,
> computer, TV set-top box and music player.

> The disclosures shed light on Microsoft's ambitions for the
> home-entertainment market and its vision for tomorrow's home computer.
They
> may also be significant in light of the antitrust case, where a key issue
is
> whether Microsoft will use its monopoly on PC operating systems to gain an
> unfair advantage in emerging markets such as set-top boxes, media players
> and services delivered over the Internet.

> Gates and Ballmer disclosed their plans shortly before the game industry's
> biggest trade show, the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles next
> week.

> Microsoft is expected to announce at the show its plans for an online Xbox
> game service. But a company strategist said it won't discuss broader plans
> for the console because it's trying to build its reputation among
developers
> who may not want to write games for a multipurpose device.

> But Gates and Ballmer apparently cannot hide their enthusiasm for the
> potential of an expanded Xbox, which could help Microsoft extend its
> presence in homes.

> Gates and Ballmer may also see Xbox as a vehicle to deliver Microsoft TV
> set-top box software.

> "It's a lot of fun to be doing a product like that, but it's also a
product
> that, because of the rich capabilities, will really kind of surprise
people
> how that fits into the home network,'' Gates was quoted in a transcript of
> an April 25 discussion at Stanford University.

> "Because it's a full-blown computer with a disk, we'll be able to let
people
> have music and photos and TV guide, and as you're watching TV, if there's
a
> sports score that's interesting to you, you have that appear exactly the
way
> you want it ... ."

> Two weeks later, the company said it had developed an electronic TV guide
> similar to those used by cable-TV companies.

> The Xbox, launched Nov. 15, is basically a Windows-based PC with a hard
disk
> that could enable it to record and play television shows. It also has a
disc
> player that can handle music CDs and DVDs and built-in components for
> broadband Internet connections.

> Steven Guggenheimer, senior director of consumer strategy at Microsoft,
> declined to discuss new features planned for the Xbox. He downplayed the
> disclosures, saying the company is focused on the Xbox's * potential
> while the executives are talking about the future. "In general, Bill and
> Steve get very enthusiastic about these technologies,'' he said. "They
like
> to talk about the possibilities."

> Ballmer said the company is working on a multifunction device that could
be
> sold at low cost and prove attractive to households that may not see the
> value of a computer. His remarks came May 11 in New York at the Blacks in
> Technology Summit.

> " ... There will be a day in the next five, six, seven years when you'll
be
> able to buy a device ... for maybe $500 or $600 that's your TV, that's
your
> CD player, your DVD player, it's your video-game player, it's your PC,
it's
> your Internet access device and it's your TV tuner all in one ... ,'' he
> said.

> With music, movies and photos increasingly digital, many companies are
> trying to develop devices combining features of computers, set-top boxes
and
> music systems and Internet access.

> In January, Prudential analyst Hans Mosesmann reported Microsoft was
> developing "HomeStation," an Xbox-based device that would allow users to
> record television shows, play games, surf the Web and do e-mail. Microsoft
> declined to discuss the report.

> One reason for the silence may be the antitrust case. Wednesday, the judge
> overseeing the case asked lawyers for more information about how the
company
> could threaten emerging markets for set-top boxes and services delivered
> over the Internet.

> States pursuing the case argue that new devices and services may evolve
into
> platforms that compete with Microsoft PC platform if the company's
> anti-competitive business practices are limited.

> Company spokesman Jim Desler said the case is about Microsoft's monopoly
on
> the PC operating-system market, and it has no such monopoly on other
> markets.

> Copyright ? 2002 The Seattle Times Company

 
 
 

Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

Post by Sean » Sun, 19 May 2002 23:07:35


An expanded XBox?  Great, now i'll have to pour concrete in front of my TV
to make sure it has a good foundation.  ; )   j/k


Quote:> Microsoft sees a future for an expanded Xbox

> By Brier Dudley
> Seattle Times technology reporter

> Microsoft has long downplayed speculation that it plans to make the Xbox
> more than just a video-game console.

> But top executives have let it slip that they indeed have broader
ambitions
> for the newly priced $199 device.

> In recent speeches around the country, Chairman Bill Gates and Chief
> Executive Steve Ballmer talked about plans to add television controls to
the
> Xbox and develop a device combining the features of a game console,
> computer, TV set-top box and music player.

> The disclosures shed light on Microsoft's ambitions for the
> home-entertainment market and its vision for tomorrow's home computer.
They
> may also be significant in light of the antitrust case, where a key issue
is
> whether Microsoft will use its monopoly on PC operating systems to gain an
> unfair advantage in emerging markets such as set-top boxes, media players
> and services delivered over the Internet.

> Gates and Ballmer disclosed their plans shortly before the game industry's
> biggest trade show, the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles next
> week.

> Microsoft is expected to announce at the show its plans for an online Xbox
> game service. But a company strategist said it won't discuss broader plans
> for the console because it's trying to build its reputation among
developers
> who may not want to write games for a multipurpose device.

> But Gates and Ballmer apparently cannot hide their enthusiasm for the
> potential of an expanded Xbox, which could help Microsoft extend its
> presence in homes.

> Gates and Ballmer may also see Xbox as a vehicle to deliver Microsoft TV
> set-top box software.

> "It's a lot of fun to be doing a product like that, but it's also a
product
> that, because of the rich capabilities, will really kind of surprise
people
> how that fits into the home network,'' Gates was quoted in a transcript of
> an April 25 discussion at Stanford University.

> "Because it's a full-blown computer with a disk, we'll be able to let
people
> have music and photos and TV guide, and as you're watching TV, if there's
a
> sports score that's interesting to you, you have that appear exactly the
way
> you want it ... ."

> Two weeks later, the company said it had developed an electronic TV guide
> similar to those used by cable-TV companies.

> The Xbox, launched Nov. 15, is basically a Windows-based PC with a hard
disk
> that could enable it to record and play television shows. It also has a
disc
> player that can handle music CDs and DVDs and built-in components for
> broadband Internet connections.

> Steven Guggenheimer, senior director of consumer strategy at Microsoft,
> declined to discuss new features planned for the Xbox. He downplayed the
> disclosures, saying the company is focused on the Xbox's * potential
> while the executives are talking about the future. "In general, Bill and
> Steve get very enthusiastic about these technologies,'' he said. "They
like
> to talk about the possibilities."

> Ballmer said the company is working on a multifunction device that could
be
> sold at low cost and prove attractive to households that may not see the
> value of a computer. His remarks came May 11 in New York at the Blacks in
> Technology Summit.

> " ... There will be a day in the next five, six, seven years when you'll
be
> able to buy a device ... for maybe $500 or $600 that's your TV, that's
your
> CD player, your DVD player, it's your video-game player, it's your PC,
it's
> your Internet access device and it's your TV tuner all in one ... ,'' he
> said.

> With music, movies and photos increasingly digital, many companies are
> trying to develop devices combining features of computers, set-top boxes
and
> music systems and Internet access.

> In January, Prudential analyst Hans Mosesmann reported Microsoft was
> developing "HomeStation," an Xbox-based device that would allow users to
> record television shows, play games, surf the Web and do e-mail. Microsoft
> declined to discuss the report.

> One reason for the silence may be the antitrust case. Wednesday, the judge
> overseeing the case asked lawyers for more information about how the
company
> could threaten emerging markets for set-top boxes and services delivered
> over the Internet.

> States pursuing the case argue that new devices and services may evolve
into
> platforms that compete with Microsoft PC platform if the company's
> anti-competitive business practices are limited.

> Company spokesman Jim Desler said the case is about Microsoft's monopoly
on
> the PC operating-system market, and it has no such monopoly on other
> markets.

> Copyright ? 2002 The Seattle Times Company

 
 
 

1. failure to power up, keyboard not seen, drive A not seen, monitor not seen

I have a 2nd hard drive installed on the computer.  
Tried to install a network card and a scanner card.
Powered on the computer and it would go through a memory test and go
up to 16000.  There would be memory error message 201. Windows95 would
start to come on, memory test again, windows, on and on
It is beeping 6 times-2 long and 4 short beeps upon powering up.
Went into setup menu and selected revert to factory settings.
Turned off the computer.  Turned it back on.
The 2 cpu lights come on-green and amber.  The keyboard does not light
up.  The monitor remains blank and drive A does not light up.
I put a rescue disk in drive A and it is not seen.

Help

Mary

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