middle age font

middle age font

Post by Jona » Fri, 11 Jul 2003 21:56:19



Hi,

I want to write an essay with a German middle aged text which has a
small "e" above "a", "o" and "u". Can you help me to find a font?

Thank you!

Jonas

 
 
 

middle age font

Post by Luz Caboos » Sun, 13 Jul 2003 07:49:37



Quote:> Hi,

> I want to write an essay with a German middle aged text which has a
> small "e" above "a", "o" and "u". Can you help me to find a font?

> Thank you!

> Jonas

Sounds like you're talking about using an umlaut above each of these
letters. Use the following key combinations:
? - alt+0228
? - alt+0246
- alt+0252

Luz

 
 
 

middle age font

Post by Ala » Sun, 13 Jul 2003 16:51:54



> I want to write an essay with a German middle aged text which has a
> small "e" above "a", "o" and "u". Can you help me to find a font?

If using Windows, run Charmap (maybe "Character map" under
Accessories) to find the keystrokes for accented characters.

In Word, look under the menu "Insert" then "Symbol".

 
 
 

middle age font

Post by Jonas Kuschne » Sun, 13 Jul 2003 18:33:22





>>Hi,

>>I want to write an essay with a German middle aged text which has a
>>small "e" above "a", "o" and "u". Can you help me to find a font?

>>Thank you!

>>Jonas

> Sounds like you're talking about using an umlaut above each of these
> letters. Use the following key combinations:
> ? - alt+0228
> ? - alt+0246
> - alt+0252

> Luz

I am a different Jonas, but I think the original poster, who seems to
have a German email-address, knows what an "Umlaut" is and has it
accessible through the keyboard.

The question, if I interpret it correctly, seems rather to be if there
is a font which marks the Umlaut with an <e> above the character instead
of using dots. I do not know, but I know that I have seen it, at least
in display fonts, in some modern (meaning 20th century) German prints.
So I guess there is a chance somebody may have made a digital font like
that. Maybe among the fonts on Dieter Steffman's website
(http://www.steffmann.de/)?

 
 
 

middle age font

Post by Andreas H?fel » Sun, 13 Jul 2003 23:07:48




> > I want to write an essay with a German middle aged text which has a
> > small "e" above "a", "o" and "u". Can you help me to find a font?

> If using Windows, run Charmap (maybe "Character map" under
> Accessories) to find the keystrokes for accented characters.

I don't think these historical Umlaut forms exist in a
standard font. I even don't know if they exist as special
characters in any Unicode table (Andreas Prilop will know,
I'm sure). If they need not be used together with the
ordinary ??, a font could easily be changed. Will the
Jonas in question please contact me?

Andreas
--
Don't use automatic reply address
mail: fonts (at) loop . de

www.fontgrube.gmxhome.de/en

 
 
 

middle age font

Post by Luz Caboos » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 03:17:51






> >>Hi,

> >>I want to write an essay with a German middle aged text which has a
> >>small "e" above "a", "o" and "u". Can you help me to find a font?

> >>Thank you!

> >>Jonas

> > Sounds like you're talking about using an umlaut above each of these
> > letters. Use the following key combinations:
> > ? - alt+0228
> > ? - alt+0246
> > - alt+0252

> > Luz

> I am a different Jonas, but I think the original poster, who seems to
> have a German email-address, knows what an "Umlaut" is and has it
> accessible through the keyboard.

> The question, if I interpret it correctly, seems rather to be if there
> is a font which marks the Umlaut with an <e> above the character instead
> of using dots. I do not know, but I know that I have seen it, at least
> in display fonts, in some modern (meaning 20th century) German prints.
> So I guess there is a chance somebody may have made a digital font like
> that. Maybe among the fonts on Dieter Steffman's website
> (http://www.steffmann.de/)?

I didn't realize that he was German, so I guess he would know about umlauts
<LOL>  I have never seen a font with 'e' above the letter. I'm not an expert
on the German language, though I took it in high school decades ago.Why
would they use an 'e' rather than the regular umlaut? For display purposes?

Luz

 
 
 

middle age font

Post by Andreas H?fel » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 04:41:39




Quote:> I didn't realize that he was German, so I guess he would know about umlauts
> <LOL>  I have never seen a font with 'e' above the letter.

So you didn't come across a 16th century early print or a critical
edition of a text of that periot? Ok, they don't teach these things
at school any more ;-)

Quote:> Why
> would they use an 'e' rather than the regular umlaut?
> For display purposes?

The "regular umlaut" with the dieresis dots originated
from a form with two vertical or slanted strokes (not
unlike the "hungarumlaut" speaking in typographical
terms). These strokes in turn are a simplified "e" in
old German handwriting, similar to the Suetterlin which
you can find as a font here and there. So the Umlauts
were originally vowels with a little "e" on top. Historical
manuscripts and prints sometimes show this shape. In
a way, the ? is a vertical oe ligature whereas the ? is
an horizontal one.

Andreas

 
 
 

middle age font

Post by Andreas Prilo » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 05:46:19



> I don't think these historical Umlaut forms exist in a
> standard font. I even don't know if they exist as special
> characters in any Unicode table (Andreas Prilop will know,
> I'm sure).

They were added recently: http://www.unicode.org/charts/PDF/U0300.pdf
For some discussion see
 http://www.google.com/search?q=%22a+with+e+above%22&filter=0

--
Top posting.
What's the most irritating thing on Usenet?

 
 
 

middle age font

Post by B. R. 'BeAr' Ederso » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 05:49:23


---------------------------------<Snip>-------------------------------

Quote:> I didn't realize that he was German, so I guess he would know about umlauts
> <LOL>  I have never seen a font with 'e' above the letter. I'm not an expert
> on the German language, though I took it in high school decades ago.Why
> would they use an 'e' rather than the regular umlaut? For display purposes?

---------------------------------<Snip>-------------------------------

If you took German lessons you most possibly can read this:

http://www.duden.de/index2.html?service/newsletterarchiv/archiv/2000/...

It says:
  1. First German texts were written with Latin letters
  2. During the 15th century writers invented the e-above-vowel form
  3. The points are only a simplification out of laziness

As to the OP: There is only one (unicode!) font I know of, which has the
needed chars. You may look here:

http://titus.fkidg1.uni-frankfurt.de/unicode/tituut.asp

The letters you are looking for are within the "Private Use"-Section of the
font: E02Ch, E244h, E32Bh, E42Ch, E644h, E72Bh.

HTH. ;-)

All the best
BeAr
--
===========================================================================
= What do you mean with: "Perfection is always an illusion"?              =
===============================================================--(Oops!)===

 
 
 

middle age font

Post by Mitche » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 06:15:48




> I want to write an essay with a German middle aged text which has a
> small "e" above "a", "o" and "u". Can you help me to find a font?

Unfortunately, this notation is not part of the standard character set
anymore. Actually, these kinds of notations are usually the origin of
modern accents, or character forms. Sometimes such a notation was used only
by some copyists, or during very limited periods, before it evolved in
forms closer to today's accents. Some notations evolved also in new

There is two approaches to this : either you need this just for one job, or
you intend to pursue research with other texts from the same period that
use the same kind of notation. If you need the variation only once, you may
be able to put the small e manually on top of letters, for instance in Word
with text boxes, or analoguous means in other programs. If you need to
pursue research, you may want to have a custom font devised from your
specifications. The original text may serve as a template for a type
designer.

--
Mitchell
http://www.FontMenu.com http://www.MICR-Fonts.com http://www.SchoolFonts.com

x--   100 Proof News - http://www.100ProofNews.com
x--   3,500+ Binary NewsGroups, and over 90,000 other groups
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middle age font

Post by Luz Caboos » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 22:40:28





> > I didn't realize that he was German, so I guess he would know about
umlauts
> > <LOL>  I have never seen a font with 'e' above the letter.

> So you didn't come across a 16th century early print or a critical
> edition of a text of that periot? Ok, they don't teach these things
> at school any more ;-)

> > Why
> > would they use an 'e' rather than the regular umlaut?
> > For display purposes?

> The "regular umlaut" with the dieresis dots originated
> from a form with two vertical or slanted strokes (not
> unlike the "hungarumlaut" speaking in typographical
> terms). These strokes in turn are a simplified "e" in
> old German handwriting, similar to the Suetterlin which
> you can find as a font here and there. So the Umlauts
> were originally vowels with a little "e" on top. Historical
> manuscripts and prints sometimes show this shape. In
> a way, the ? is a vertical oe ligature whereas the ? is
> an horizontal one.

> Andreas

Thanks for the information Andreas. It was very informative. I was looking
at the Alt Schwabacher font from Dieter's site yesterday and experimenting
with some of the special characters such as these alt combinations: (which
only show up when using that font) Alt 0223, and 0188-0190 (the double
letters) which look like fi, ff, ft. Is there a site which explains what
they are used for? It's been approximately 50 years ago when I first learned
German, much of which I have forgotten due to not using it.
Thanks again.
Luz
 
 
 

middle age font

Post by Luz Caboos » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 22:55:06





<snip>

> If you took German lessons you most possibly can read this:

http://www.duden.de/index2.html?service/newsletterarchiv/archiv/2000/....
html

Quote:

> It says:
>   1. First German texts were written with Latin letters
>   2. During the 15th century writers invented the e-above-vowel form
>   3. The points are only a simplification out of laziness

> As to the OP: There is only one (unicode!) font I know of, which has the
> needed chars. You may look here:

> http://titus.fkidg1.uni-frankfurt.de/unicode/tituut.asp

> The letters you are looking for are within the "Private Use"-Section of
the
> font: E02Ch, E244h, E32Bh, E42Ch, E644h, E72Bh.

> HTH. ;-)

> All the best
> BeAr

Thanks for the summary of the article and the link to the font.
Regards,
Luz
 
 
 

middle age font

Post by Andreas H?fel » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 19:47:01





> > ... characters in any Unicode table (Andreas Prilop will know,
> > I'm sure).

> They were added recently: http://www.unicode.org/charts/PDF/U0300.pdf
> For some discussion see
>  http://www.google.com/search?q=%22a+with+e+above%22&filter=0

Well there you go ;-)

Andreas (H.)

 
 
 

middle age font

Post by Andreas H?fel » Tue, 15 Jul 2003 05:11:07




Quote:> Thanks for the information Andreas. It was very informative.

YW

Quote:> I was looking
> at the Alt Schwabacher font from Dieter's site yesterday and experimenting
> with some of the special characters such as these alt combinations: (which
> only show up when using that font) Alt 0223,

This is the "germandbls" ligature which is still used in modern German
and which does exist in every complete ISO 8859-1 font.

I didn't see an "Alt Schwabacher" font on his site, but there is a
"Schwabacher" font on his S-Z page. I will refer to this one.
The

Quote:> and 0188-0190 (the double
> letters) which look like fi, ff, ft. Is there a site which explains what
> they are used for?

They are what you took them for - ligatures. They were used
in hot metal Blackletter printing, and many Blackletter fonts
contain them.

Quote:> It's been approximately 50 years ago when I first learned
> German,

That's about ten years earlier than me ;-)

Andreas

 
 
 

1. middle age font found

Hi,
Jonas again, the one who asked for the font. Thanks a lot for all the
answers, especially to "aschliesser" who has sent me this link which
solved all my problems:
http://www.mediaevum.de/haupt6.htm
(unfortunately, I'm not able to create a hyperlink in an e-mail...
Anyway, this i not a question ;-)

Greetings
Jonas

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