Proposed Network Setup

Proposed Network Setup

Post by Ogle Enterprise » Sat, 31 Oct 1998 04:00:00



We have seven location that we would like to setup, and connect.  The
location are spread out over a 60 mile radius.

I am meeting with the local bell company today to discuss what option are
availible to us for high speed communication.

If anyone could look the following information, and give me an opinion that
I can take to my boss, I would appreciate it.

If you need more information, please let me know.

Thanks.

Proposal for OGLE NET:

Overview:  

The corporate office will run Microsoft Back Office Server, using MS-SQL,
MS-Exchange, MS-Proxy Server, MS-System Management Server and MS-WinNT
Server.

Each remote location will run Microsoft Back Office Server, MS-Exchange,
MS-Proxy Server, MS-System Management Server and MS-WinNT Server.

The clients for all location will run Windows 95 or 98.  Services will be
installed for Exchange, SQL, Proxy, SMS and Microsoft Networks.

All location will be connected via the Proxy Servers (no caching, no dial
on demand) using a yet to be decided high-speed connection (T1, ISDN).  The
possibility of Internet VPN is still being discussed.

Name Convention:

All units must have a unique name.  Name conventions are as follow.

00NTS40PFS01

First two digits indicate machine location (00=CORP, 02=Arlington Salon,
etc.)  
Digits three through six indication OS on unit (NTS40 = NT Server 4.0,
WIN95 = Windows 95, DOS60 = Dos Version 6, etc.)
Digits seven through nine indicate the role of the computer (PFS= Primary
File Server, WKS=General Work Station, APT=Appointment Book, etc)
The last two digits indicate the unit number for that role.

The example above indicates that the machine is in the corporate office,
running NT Server 4.0, acting as a file server and is the first file server
in the group.

02WIN95APT02 would indicate that the machine is in the Arlington salon,
running Windows 95, acting as an Appointment Book and is the second
appointment book in the group at that location.

MS- System Management Server.

All soft installation will occur via the SMS.  It will handle inventory of
all machines, at an administrators defined interval (default to seven
days).  The inventory includes OS, BIOS, HD (size/free), memory, installed
software, last config change, resource settings (IRQ and environmental
paths).  

The SMS administrator can query this inventory to find machines that can
run a specific software package, have had config changes or may need
upgrading.  The SMS administrator can create packages to be sent to clients
for upgrading software or new installations.  The clients SMS service will
check for new packages, and depending on the package setting, perform the
upgrade with or without user intervention.  Packages can be installed at
users choice or mandatory.

MS-Exchange Server

This mail host will handle all email and meeting requests.  Each location
will have a domain name, so email will be routed to the correct Exchange
Server.  All email is stored on the Exchange Server and auto archived after
three weeks.  Users can access their Exchange account from any workstation.
 The user profile will use the network security cache to log the user into
their mailbox.  This also allows the users to "Roam", so the contents of
the users inbox will not remain on the workstation.
Exchange Mailboxes are automatically setup when the user is added to the NT
Server.

MS-SQL

The SQL Server will handle all database transactions for the SALON.DB.  It
offers us the ability to unload data while the system is running, so we can
have the database redundant at a disaster recovery point.  That recovery
database will be updated a least every hour, more often if the network is
not experiencing loads over 50%.

MS-PROXY SERVER

Each location will connect to the data source via a Proxy Sever.  This will
allow use to use Intranet or Internet planning.  It will also provide us
with a higher level of security.  Client requests are sent to Proxy Server,
then routed to the data source.

Network Protocol

The Protocol used will be TCP/IP.  DHCP will lease the IP address for up to
three days.  If an IP address expires, the client will receive a new lease
upon sign on.  This will eliminate the need to manual assign IP addresses.
When the users signs on the SMS will update the clients Inventory to
reflect the change in IP address.

I have a model network up and running with everything described above,
expect the Proxy Server (I didn't have phone lines in the work area).
Everything is running fine.  I started to run disaster testing today.

 
 
 

Proposed Network Setup

Post by Grey Lancaster [Solutions » Sat, 31 Oct 1998 04:00:00


suits me/over my head
Grey

>We have seven location that we would like to setup, and connect.  The
>location are spread out over a 60 mile radius.

>I am meeting with the local bell company today to discuss what option are
>availible to us for high speed communication.

>If anyone could look the following information, and give me an opinion that
>I can take to my boss, I would appreciate it.

>If you need more information, please let me know.

>Thanks.

>Proposal for OGLE NET:

>Overview:

>The corporate office will run Microsoft Back Office Server, using MS-SQL,
>MS-Exchange, MS-Proxy Server, MS-System Management Server and MS-WinNT
>Server.

>Each remote location will run Microsoft Back Office Server, MS-Exchange,
>MS-Proxy Server, MS-System Management Server and MS-WinNT Server.

>The clients for all location will run Windows 95 or 98.  Services will be
>installed for Exchange, SQL, Proxy, SMS and Microsoft Networks.

>All location will be connected via the Proxy Servers (no caching, no dial
>on demand) using a yet to be decided high-speed connection (T1, ISDN).  The
>possibility of Internet VPN is still being discussed.

>Name Convention:

>All units must have a unique name.  Name conventions are as follow.

>00NTS40PFS01

>First two digits indicate machine location (00=CORP, 02=Arlington Salon,
>etc.)
>Digits three through six indication OS on unit (NTS40 = NT Server 4.0,
>WIN95 = Windows 95, DOS60 = Dos Version 6, etc.)
>Digits seven through nine indicate the role of the computer (PFS= Primary
>File Server, WKS=General Work Station, APT=Appointment Book, etc)
>The last two digits indicate the unit number for that role.

>The example above indicates that the machine is in the corporate office,
>running NT Server 4.0, acting as a file server and is the first file server
>in the group.

>02WIN95APT02 would indicate that the machine is in the Arlington salon,
>running Windows 95, acting as an Appointment Book and is the second
>appointment book in the group at that location.

>MS- System Management Server.

>All soft installation will occur via the SMS.  It will handle inventory of
>all machines, at an administrators defined interval (default to seven
>days).  The inventory includes OS, BIOS, HD (size/free), memory, installed
>software, last config change, resource settings (IRQ and environmental
>paths).

>The SMS administrator can query this inventory to find machines that can
>run a specific software package, have had config changes or may need
>upgrading.  The SMS administrator can create packages to be sent to clients
>for upgrading software or new installations.  The clients SMS service will
>check for new packages, and depending on the package setting, perform the
>upgrade with or without user intervention.  Packages can be installed at
>users choice or mandatory.

>MS-Exchange Server

>This mail host will handle all email and meeting requests.  Each location
>will have a domain name, so email will be routed to the correct Exchange
>Server.  All email is stored on the Exchange Server and auto archived after
>three weeks.  Users can access their Exchange account from any workstation.
> The user profile will use the network security cache to log the user into
>their mailbox.  This also allows the users to "Roam", so the contents of
>the users inbox will not remain on the workstation.
>Exchange Mailboxes are automatically setup when the user is added to the NT
>Server.

>MS-SQL

>The SQL Server will handle all database transactions for the SALON.DB.  It
>offers us the ability to unload data while the system is running, so we can
>have the database redundant at a disaster recovery point.  That recovery
>database will be updated a least every hour, more often if the network is
>not experiencing loads over 50%.

>MS-PROXY SERVER

>Each location will connect to the data source via a Proxy Sever.  This will
>allow use to use Intranet or Internet planning.  It will also provide us
>with a higher level of security.  Client requests are sent to Proxy Server,
>then routed to the data source.

>Network Protocol

>The Protocol used will be TCP/IP.  DHCP will lease the IP address for up to
>three days.  If an IP address expires, the client will receive a new lease
>upon sign on.  This will eliminate the need to manual assign IP addresses.
>When the users signs on the SMS will update the clients Inventory to
>reflect the change in IP address.

>I have a model network up and running with everything described above,
>expect the Proxy Server (I didn't have phone lines in the work area).
>Everything is running fine.  I started to run disaster testing today.


 
 
 

Proposed Network Setup

Post by Norm » Mon, 02 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Will you use Wins? Are you going to install NETBuei as a backup? I've had
problems with 95 clients and DHCP, had to end up switching all my 95 clients
to fixed ip addresses.  Don't forget to install proxy client on the
workstations.

>We have seven location that we would like to setup, and connect.  The
>location are spread out over a 60 mile radius.

>I am meeting with the local bell company today to discuss what option are
>availible to us for high speed communication.

>If anyone could look the following information, and give me an opinion that
>I can take to my boss, I would appreciate it.

>If you need more information, please let me know.

>Thanks.

>Proposal for OGLE NET:

>Overview:

>The corporate office will run Microsoft Back Office Server, using MS-SQL,
>MS-Exchange, MS-Proxy Server, MS-System Management Server and MS-WinNT
>Server.

>Each remote location will run Microsoft Back Office Server, MS-Exchange,
>MS-Proxy Server, MS-System Management Server and MS-WinNT Server.

>The clients for all location will run Windows 95 or 98.  Services will be
>installed for Exchange, SQL, Proxy, SMS and Microsoft Networks.

>All location will be connected via the Proxy Servers (no caching, no dial
>on demand) using a yet to be decided high-speed connection (T1, ISDN).  The
>possibility of Internet VPN is still being discussed.

>Name Convention:

>All units must have a unique name.  Name conventions are as follow.

>00NTS40PFS01

>First two digits indicate machine location (00=CORP, 02=Arlington Salon,
>etc.)
>Digits three through six indication OS on unit (NTS40 = NT Server 4.0,
>WIN95 = Windows 95, DOS60 = Dos Version 6, etc.)
>Digits seven through nine indicate the role of the computer (PFS= Primary
>File Server, WKS=General Work Station, APT=Appointment Book, etc)
>The last two digits indicate the unit number for that role.

>The example above indicates that the machine is in the corporate office,
>running NT Server 4.0, acting as a file server and is the first file server
>in the group.

>02WIN95APT02 would indicate that the machine is in the Arlington salon,
>running Windows 95, acting as an Appointment Book and is the second
>appointment book in the group at that location.

>MS- System Management Server.

>All soft installation will occur via the SMS.  It will handle inventory of
>all machines, at an administrators defined interval (default to seven
>days).  The inventory includes OS, BIOS, HD (size/free), memory, installed
>software, last config change, resource settings (IRQ and environmental
>paths).

>The SMS administrator can query this inventory to find machines that can
>run a specific software package, have had config changes or may need
>upgrading.  The SMS administrator can create packages to be sent to clients
>for upgrading software or new installations.  The clients SMS service will
>check for new packages, and depending on the package setting, perform the
>upgrade with or without user intervention.  Packages can be installed at
>users choice or mandatory.

>MS-Exchange Server

>This mail host will handle all email and meeting requests.  Each location
>will have a domain name, so email will be routed to the correct Exchange
>Server.  All email is stored on the Exchange Server and auto archived after
>three weeks.  Users can access their Exchange account from any workstation.
> The user profile will use the network security cache to log the user into
>their mailbox.  This also allows the users to "Roam", so the contents of
>the users inbox will not remain on the workstation.
>Exchange Mailboxes are automatically setup when the user is added to the NT
>Server.

>MS-SQL

>The SQL Server will handle all database transactions for the SALON.DB.  It
>offers us the ability to unload data while the system is running, so we can
>have the database redundant at a disaster recovery point.  That recovery
>database will be updated a least every hour, more often if the network is
>not experiencing loads over 50%.

>MS-PROXY SERVER

>Each location will connect to the data source via a Proxy Sever.  This will
>allow use to use Intranet or Internet planning.  It will also provide us
>with a higher level of security.  Client requests are sent to Proxy Server,
>then routed to the data source.

>Network Protocol

>The Protocol used will be TCP/IP.  DHCP will lease the IP address for up to
>three days.  If an IP address expires, the client will receive a new lease
>upon sign on.  This will eliminate the need to manual assign IP addresses.
>When the users signs on the SMS will update the clients Inventory to
>reflect the change in IP address.

>I have a model network up and running with everything described above,
>expect the Proxy Server (I didn't have phone lines in the work area).
>Everything is running fine.  I started to run disaster testing today.

 
 
 

Proposed Network Setup

Post by Ian Ture » Mon, 02 Nov 1998 04:00:00


In order to properly analyze the problem you need to give us more data:

how many machines at each location
what is the (expected) baseline load put on NT servers by the clients
the kind of connectivity links (end expected utilization)
etc.

Ian Turek
Systems Scalability Engineer
Gravity Square Inc.
www.gravitysquare.com


>We have seven location that we would like to setup, and connect.  The
>location are spread out over a 60 mile radius.

>I am meeting with the local bell company today to discuss what option are
>availible to us for high speed communication.

>If anyone could look the following information, and give me an opinion that
>I can take to my boss, I would appreciate it.

>If you need more information, please let me know.

>Thanks.

>Proposal for OGLE NET:

>Overview:

>The corporate office will run Microsoft Back Office Server, using MS-SQL,
>MS-Exchange, MS-Proxy Server, MS-System Management Server and MS-WinNT
>Server.

>Each remote location will run Microsoft Back Office Server, MS-Exchange,
>MS-Proxy Server, MS-System Management Server and MS-WinNT Server.

>The clients for all location will run Windows 95 or 98.  Services will be
>installed for Exchange, SQL, Proxy, SMS and Microsoft Networks.

>All location will be connected via the Proxy Servers (no caching, no dial
>on demand) using a yet to be decided high-speed connection (T1, ISDN).  The
>possibility of Internet VPN is still being discussed.

>Name Convention:

>All units must have a unique name.  Name conventions are as follow.

>00NTS40PFS01

>First two digits indicate machine location (00=CORP, 02=Arlington Salon,
>etc.)
>Digits three through six indication OS on unit (NTS40 = NT Server 4.0,
>WIN95 = Windows 95, DOS60 = Dos Version 6, etc.)
>Digits seven through nine indicate the role of the computer (PFS= Primary
>File Server, WKS=General Work Station, APT=Appointment Book, etc)
>The last two digits indicate the unit number for that role.

>The example above indicates that the machine is in the corporate office,
>running NT Server 4.0, acting as a file server and is the first file server
>in the group.

>02WIN95APT02 would indicate that the machine is in the Arlington salon,
>running Windows 95, acting as an Appointment Book and is the second
>appointment book in the group at that location.

>MS- System Management Server.

>All soft installation will occur via the SMS.  It will handle inventory of
>all machines, at an administrators defined interval (default to seven
>days).  The inventory includes OS, BIOS, HD (size/free), memory, installed
>software, last config change, resource settings (IRQ and environmental
>paths).

>The SMS administrator can query this inventory to find machines that can
>run a specific software package, have had config changes or may need
>upgrading.  The SMS administrator can create packages to be sent to clients
>for upgrading software or new installations.  The clients SMS service will
>check for new packages, and depending on the package setting, perform the
>upgrade with or without user intervention.  Packages can be installed at
>users choice or mandatory.

>MS-Exchange Server

>This mail host will handle all email and meeting requests.  Each location
>will have a domain name, so email will be routed to the correct Exchange
>Server.  All email is stored on the Exchange Server and auto archived after
>three weeks.  Users can access their Exchange account from any workstation.
> The user profile will use the network security cache to log the user into
>their mailbox.  This also allows the users to "Roam", so the contents of
>the users inbox will not remain on the workstation.
>Exchange Mailboxes are automatically setup when the user is added to the NT
>Server.

>MS-SQL

>The SQL Server will handle all database transactions for the SALON.DB.  It
>offers us the ability to unload data while the system is running, so we can
>have the database redundant at a disaster recovery point.  That recovery
>database will be updated a least every hour, more often if the network is
>not experiencing loads over 50%.

>MS-PROXY SERVER

>Each location will connect to the data source via a Proxy Sever.  This will
>allow use to use Intranet or Internet planning.  It will also provide us
>with a higher level of security.  Client requests are sent to Proxy Server,
>then routed to the data source.

>Network Protocol

>The Protocol used will be TCP/IP.  DHCP will lease the IP address for up to
>three days.  If an IP address expires, the client will receive a new lease
>upon sign on.  This will eliminate the need to manual assign IP addresses.
>When the users signs on the SMS will update the clients Inventory to
>reflect the change in IP address.

>I have a model network up and running with everything described above,
>expect the Proxy Server (I didn't have phone lines in the work area).
>Everything is running fine.  I started to run disaster testing today.

 
 
 

Proposed Network Setup

Post by Kevla » Tue, 03 Nov 1998 04:00:00


A common statement when DHCP is not deployed/maintained properly.  I have
done multiple DHCP deployments for both large and small companies, and have
yet to run into any _major_ problems.  Every client that I have deployed
DHCP for is still running it today.

-kev


>Will you use Wins? Are you going to install NETBuei as a backup? I've had
>problems with 95 clients and DHCP, had to end up switching all my 95
clients
>to fixed ip addresses.  Don't forget to install proxy client on the
>workstations.


>>We have seven location that we would like to setup, and connect.  The
>>location are spread out over a 60 mile radius.

>>I am meeting with the local bell company today to discuss what option are
>>availible to us for high speed communication.

>>If anyone could look the following information, and give me an opinion
that
>>I can take to my boss, I would appreciate it.

>>If you need more information, please let me know.

>>Thanks.

>>Proposal for OGLE NET:

>>Overview:

>>The corporate office will run Microsoft Back Office Server, using MS-SQL,
>>MS-Exchange, MS-Proxy Server, MS-System Management Server and MS-WinNT
>>Server.

>>Each remote location will run Microsoft Back Office Server, MS-Exchange,
>>MS-Proxy Server, MS-System Management Server and MS-WinNT Server.

>>The clients for all location will run Windows 95 or 98.  Services will be
>>installed for Exchange, SQL, Proxy, SMS and Microsoft Networks.

>>All location will be connected via the Proxy Servers (no caching, no dial
>>on demand) using a yet to be decided high-speed connection (T1, ISDN).
The
>>possibility of Internet VPN is still being discussed.

>>Name Convention:

>>All units must have a unique name.  Name conventions are as follow.

>>00NTS40PFS01

>>First two digits indicate machine location (00=CORP, 02=Arlington Salon,
>>etc.)
>>Digits three through six indication OS on unit (NTS40 = NT Server 4.0,
>>WIN95 = Windows 95, DOS60 = Dos Version 6, etc.)
>>Digits seven through nine indicate the role of the computer (PFS= Primary
>>File Server, WKS=General Work Station, APT=Appointment Book, etc)
>>The last two digits indicate the unit number for that role.

>>The example above indicates that the machine is in the corporate office,
>>running NT Server 4.0, acting as a file server and is the first file
server
>>in the group.

>>02WIN95APT02 would indicate that the machine is in the Arlington salon,
>>running Windows 95, acting as an Appointment Book and is the second
>>appointment book in the group at that location.

>>MS- System Management Server.

>>All soft installation will occur via the SMS.  It will handle inventory of
>>all machines, at an administrators defined interval (default to seven
>>days).  The inventory includes OS, BIOS, HD (size/free), memory, installed
>>software, last config change, resource settings (IRQ and environmental
>>paths).

>>The SMS administrator can query this inventory to find machines that can
>>run a specific software package, have had config changes or may need
>>upgrading.  The SMS administrator can create packages to be sent to
clients
>>for upgrading software or new installations.  The clients SMS service will
>>check for new packages, and depending on the package setting, perform the
>>upgrade with or without user intervention.  Packages can be installed at
>>users choice or mandatory.

>>MS-Exchange Server

>>This mail host will handle all email and meeting requests.  Each location
>>will have a domain name, so email will be routed to the correct Exchange
>>Server.  All email is stored on the Exchange Server and auto archived
after
>>three weeks.  Users can access their Exchange account from any
workstation.
>> The user profile will use the network security cache to log the user into
>>their mailbox.  This also allows the users to "Roam", so the contents of
>>the users inbox will not remain on the workstation.
>>Exchange Mailboxes are automatically setup when the user is added to the
NT
>>Server.

>>MS-SQL

>>The SQL Server will handle all database transactions for the SALON.DB.  It
>>offers us the ability to unload data while the system is running, so we
can
>>have the database redundant at a disaster recovery point.  That recovery
>>database will be updated a least every hour, more often if the network is
>>not experiencing loads over 50%.

>>MS-PROXY SERVER

>>Each location will connect to the data source via a Proxy Sever.  This
will
>>allow use to use Intranet or Internet planning.  It will also provide us
>>with a higher level of security.  Client requests are sent to Proxy
Server,
>>then routed to the data source.

>>Network Protocol

>>The Protocol used will be TCP/IP.  DHCP will lease the IP address for up
to
>>three days.  If an IP address expires, the client will receive a new lease
>>upon sign on.  This will eliminate the need to manual assign IP addresses.
>>When the users signs on the SMS will update the clients Inventory to
>>reflect the change in IP address.

>>I have a model network up and running with everything described above,
>>expect the Proxy Server (I didn't have phone lines in the work area).
>>Everything is running fine.  I started to run disaster testing today.

 
 
 

Proposed Network Setup

Post by Kevla » Tue, 03 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Lets address two items:

First - Your software requirements for the server are extermely intense.
Not only do most of these software components generate a lot of CPU traffic,
if not properly designed and deployed, they will create quite a bit of
network traffic.  In addition, the complexity of running all of these
products on the same server increases the amount of troubleshooting, failure
rate, and downtime.  I would seriously consider re-engineering these servers
prior to deployment.

Second - You made no mention of the client load, and support requirements
for this environment.

As for your naming conventions, in my experience, the least restrictive
naming convention is the best.  Don't lock a machine into a version (i.e.
WIN95) as they change often, and a simple upgrade negates your naming
convention.

K.I.S.S. - SV01ST01 = SerVer 1 at STore 1 would be a simple example.  For
workstations, WK01ST01 = WorKstation 1 at STore 1 would also work.  Tying a
server to services can bite you when you change the role of the server and
don't have time to rebuild.  Thats when you get things like "Oh, ya,
SVEXCHANGE is our SQL server..."  About the only thing that you can tie a
name to is the domain role (IE PDC, BDC, or SA for Standalone).  But this,
too, will change in Windows 2000.

Good luck

Kevin Orbaker, MCSE
QuickStart Technologies, Inc.


>We have seven location that we would like to setup, and connect.  The
>location are spread out over a 60 mile radius.

>I am meeting with the local bell company today to discuss what option are
>availible to us for high speed communication.

>If anyone could look the following information, and give me an opinion that
>I can take to my boss, I would appreciate it.

>If you need more information, please let me know.

>Thanks.

>Proposal for OGLE NET:

>Overview:

>The corporate office will run Microsoft Back Office Server, using MS-SQL,
>MS-Exchange, MS-Proxy Server, MS-System Management Server and MS-WinNT
>Server.

>Each remote location will run Microsoft Back Office Server, MS-Exchange,
>MS-Proxy Server, MS-System Management Server and MS-WinNT Server.

>The clients for all location will run Windows 95 or 98.  Services will be
>installed for Exchange, SQL, Proxy, SMS and Microsoft Networks.

>All location will be connected via the Proxy Servers (no caching, no dial
>on demand) using a yet to be decided high-speed connection (T1, ISDN).  The
>possibility of Internet VPN is still being discussed.

>Name Convention:

>All units must have a unique name.  Name conventions are as follow.

>00NTS40PFS01

>First two digits indicate machine location (00=CORP, 02=Arlington Salon,
>etc.)
>Digits three through six indication OS on unit (NTS40 = NT Server 4.0,
>WIN95 = Windows 95, DOS60 = Dos Version 6, etc.)
>Digits seven through nine indicate the role of the computer (PFS= Primary
>File Server, WKS=General Work Station, APT=Appointment Book, etc)
>The last two digits indicate the unit number for that role.

>The example above indicates that the machine is in the corporate office,
>running NT Server 4.0, acting as a file server and is the first file server
>in the group.

>02WIN95APT02 would indicate that the machine is in the Arlington salon,
>running Windows 95, acting as an Appointment Book and is the second
>appointment book in the group at that location.

>MS- System Management Server.

>All soft installation will occur via the SMS.  It will handle inventory of
>all machines, at an administrators defined interval (default to seven
>days).  The inventory includes OS, BIOS, HD (size/free), memory, installed
>software, last config change, resource settings (IRQ and environmental
>paths).

>The SMS administrator can query this inventory to find machines that can
>run a specific software package, have had config changes or may need
>upgrading.  The SMS administrator can create packages to be sent to clients
>for upgrading software or new installations.  The clients SMS service will
>check for new packages, and depending on the package setting, perform the
>upgrade with or without user intervention.  Packages can be installed at
>users choice or mandatory.

>MS-Exchange Server

>This mail host will handle all email and meeting requests.  Each location
>will have a domain name, so email will be routed to the correct Exchange
>Server.  All email is stored on the Exchange Server and auto archived after
>three weeks.  Users can access their Exchange account from any workstation.
> The user profile will use the network security cache to log the user into
>their mailbox.  This also allows the users to "Roam", so the contents of
>the users inbox will not remain on the workstation.
>Exchange Mailboxes are automatically setup when the user is added to the NT
>Server.

>MS-SQL

>The SQL Server will handle all database transactions for the SALON.DB.  It
>offers us the ability to unload data while the system is running, so we can
>have the database redundant at a disaster recovery point.  That recovery
>database will be updated a least every hour, more often if the network is
>not experiencing loads over 50%.

>MS-PROXY SERVER

>Each location will connect to the data source via a Proxy Sever.  This will
>allow use to use Intranet or Internet planning.  It will also provide us
>with a higher level of security.  Client requests are sent to Proxy Server,
>then routed to the data source.

>Network Protocol

>The Protocol used will be TCP/IP.  DHCP will lease the IP address for up to
>three days.  If an IP address expires, the client will receive a new lease
>upon sign on.  This will eliminate the need to manual assign IP addresses.
>When the users signs on the SMS will update the clients Inventory to
>reflect the change in IP address.

>I have a model network up and running with everything described above,
>expect the Proxy Server (I didn't have phone lines in the work area).
>Everything is running fine.  I started to run disaster testing today.

 
 
 

Proposed Network Setup

Post by Dave » Wed, 04 Nov 1998 04:00:00


Greetings

Sounds Like a good network.  However you are not clear as to the Domain
model you wish to use.  Exchange Sites don't need to span Domains to ensure
that the mail will be on the proper Ex Server.  Where the mailbox is created
the mail will go.

Also a problem with SMS installs is that many programs require admin rights.
What I did to overcome this is create a Global group named SuperStaff.  Then
in each local admin group add the \\domain\superstaff group.  I would then
add users to that group just before a rollout.  This only gives admin
privileges to the machines with the groups added and is not that bad of a
security breach for a short term.

Well good luck.  By the way is your name Brian? And were you from MT? If so
I know you.

Good Luck
Dave Riitano

 
 
 

1. 5.5 Upgrade -- proposed procedure

As readers of my previous posts this last week are aware, I had a perfectly
functional NT 4.0 sp3 server running MSE 5.0 and IIS 3, until I installed NT
sp 4, which took down POP3, LDAP and OWA.  Because an upgrade to MSE 5.5 was
in the works anyway, the schedule has been moved up -- to this weekend.  I'd
appreciate any feedback on my current plan:

Back everything up.  Twice.
Uninstall IIS 3.
Install and configure IIS 4 (am I right in assuming that ASP is part of this
release and not a separate package as it was in IIS 3.0?)
Run the upgrade to MSE 5.5 (am I right in assuming that the reference to the
ASP (OWA and memory leak) hotfix in the release notes is pre-IIS 4.0 and
pre-NT sp4 and that I therefore don't have to install it?)
Install sp1 for MSE 5.5

Finally, I have a site connector running -- I didn't see anything specific
in the documentation, so do I need to uninstall that before I upgrade and
then reinstall it, or will the setup process reconfigure it without
intervention?

Thanks for the past and future assistance!

Jim Shilliday

2. c1037ae6

3. Proposed News Group. SBS

4. Sending Faxes

5. How to do easy network wide setup?

6. Error in Exchange 5.5 Admin

7. Setup of outlook dial-up networking to Exchange 5.5

8. Can′t receive emal from Internet

9. Bizzar network setup

10. Setup error: Network path not found

11. Setup exchange on local network cant send mail to remote people

12. MS Exchange and Outlook setup on a network

13. Network setup for exchange?