X.400 connector

X.400 connector

Post by WL » Thu, 29 Jun 2000 04:00:00



Hi,

We've a domain in Singapore (SG) and one different domain in Japan (JP).  We
have a few Exchange servers
running in SG and 1 Exchange server in JP.  They are linked up with a
128kbps leased line.  All Exchange servers in SG and JP are setting up using
the same org name.  Users ID are created in its own domain.  How can these
Exchange servers in SG and JP "talk" to each other?  Do we need to set
trusted relationship in both domain?  We read about site connector and X.400
connector.  No sure which connector to use.  Tried site connector in JP to
browse the Exchange server in SG but encountered error message.  Tried X.400
but I am too confused with all the info it required to configure.  I read a
few Exchange books but could not find much info on configuring X.400.  Surf
the net but to no avail.

Thank you for your help.

 
 
 

X.400 connector

Post by Amiri Jone » Thu, 29 Jun 2000 04:00:00



Quote:> Hi,

> We've a domain in Singapore (SG) and one different domain in Japan (JP).
We
> have a few Exchange servers
> running in SG and 1 Exchange server in JP.  They are linked up with a
> 128kbps leased line.  All Exchange servers in SG and JP are setting up
using
> the same org name.  Users ID are created in its own domain.  How can these
> Exchange servers in SG and JP "talk" to each other?  Do we need to set
> trusted relationship in both domain?  We read about site connector and
X.400
> connector.  No sure which connector to use.  Tried site connector in JP to
> browse the Exchange server in SG but encountered error message.  Tried
X.400
> but I am too confused with all the info it required to configure.  I read
a
> few Exchange books but could not find much info on configuring X.400.
Surf
> the net but to no avail.

    Before considering the Site Connector, ask yourself how much other
traffic is going over this leased line.  If you have less than 64 kbps
available bandwidth, don't use this connector.  As far as a trust is
concerned, it would make setting up the connector a bit easier, but it isn't
a requirement; you can use the Override tab of the Site Connector's
properties to specify the details of the remote site's service account.
    Yes, configuring the X.400 connector can be a bit tricky, but not
terribly so.  First, install the TCP/IP MTA Transport Stack on both servers.
Then create the connector.  On the General tab, the main values to fill out
are the Display and Directory Names, and the name of the MTA on the remote
end (this value is set on the Override page), and the MTA password, if there
is one.  The 'Remote Clients Support MAPI' option should be checked, as
should the Never option for word wrap.
    The Schedule page should be filled out according to your needs.  On the
Stack page, specify either the remote server's hostname or IP address.  All
the other fields can (and should) be left blank.  On the Override page, give
the local MTA a name (doesn't really matter what you use), and for your
purposes, leave the Password blank.  Leave everything else at its default.
Leave the Address Spaces tab blank.  Define the remote site using the
Connected Sites tab.  Leave the Delivery Restrictions page blank, unless you
want to restrict usage.  Finally, leave the settings on the Advanced page at
their defaults.  Test the connection by sending a message to someone in the
other site, using their X.400 address, and have them reply to the message.
At this point, you can establish directory replication, which will give you
a unified Global Address List.
    One thing to be aware of when using the X.400 connector:  If you have a
multi-server site, ALL servers in the site must have a license for the X.400
connector, regardless of whether or not the connector is installed on the
machine.  The only way I know to get an X.400 license (if you aren't running
the Enterprise version on these machines already) is to buy the X.400
connector.  Therefore, if you have 4 servers in a site, you must buy 4 X.400
connectors, even if you only plan to install one of them.

 
 
 

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Hi,
        I am using exchange 5.5 (sp1) to send messages containing a security
classification through the exchange X.400 connector. The security
classification is no longer present when the message arrives at the
X.400 system. When sending to another exchange user the classification
is still present, and if encoded as a TNEF attachment the classification
gets through o.k., but not as an X.400 attribute. I have heard it said
that this is a problem with the exchange X.400 connector. I have checked
the bug fix list for SP2 and SP3 but there is no mention of this
problem. Anyone have any ideas or info on this? TIA,
        Barry McCarthy

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