Emails Out-Of-Control

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Al x » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00



My exchange server is growing out of control.  Is not the logs, is not
spamming is my own users how wish to keep their emails forever.  Company
policy doesn't allow us to deleted their old items.  We have tried archiving
(is not feasable), We try PST but they want centralize emails and PST don't
work welll over the network.  A bigger box sound like the ideal, but what
can i do in order to fall under the same mistake we are now trying to
correct?

Despearte my exchange is about to quit!

AL x

 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Andy Gate » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00



>My exchange server is growing out of control.  Is not the logs, is not
>spamming is my own users how wish to keep their emails forever.  Company
>policy doesn't allow us to deleted their old items.  We have tried
archiving
>(is not feasable), We try PST but they want centralize emails and PST don't
>work welll over the network.  A bigger box sound like the ideal, but what
>can i do in order to fall under the same mistake we are now trying to
>correct?

This is a manager-management issue.   You don't want to use PSTs, PST=BAD.
And the bosses don't want to reduce the mailboxes.  So what you need is the
nod from your manager to slap some extra storage space into your Exchange
server.

Don't worry, storage is cheap.  Honest [grin]

    Andy Gates
    Project People IT Recruitment
    www.project-people.com

 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Kirill S. Palagi » Fri, 15 Oct 1999 04:00:00


If .edb are too big then Al x should demand additional server. If management is
willing to pay - fine. If not - users are out of luck.


> >Don't worry, storage is cheap.  Honest [grin]

> But backup, management and recovery isn't.  Increasing storage is the simple
> answer, but do you want to backup or restore a 100gb info store just because
> users are too lazy to delete stuff they don't need.

> Let's face it, 90% of what it there is rubbish people are too lazy too clean
> up.  Set limits on your info store that prevent people sending once the
> mailbox gets to a certain size.

--
Questions will not be answered via e-mail.
 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Wendy Culsha » Sat, 16 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:>Don't worry, storage is cheap.  Honest [grin]

But backup, management and recovery isn't.  Increasing storage is the simple
answer, but do you want to backup or restore a 100gb info store just because
users are too lazy to delete stuff they don't need.

Let's face it, 90% of what it there is rubbish people are too lazy too clean
up.  Set limits on your info store that prevent people sending once the
mailbox gets to a certain size.

 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Chris Schar » Sat, 16 Oct 1999 04:00:00



Quote:>My exchange server is growing out of control.  Is not the logs, is not
>spamming is my own users how wish to keep their emails forever.  Company
>policy doesn't allow us to deleted their old items.  We have tried archiving
>(is not feasable), We try PST but they want centralize emails and PST don't
>work welll over the network.  A bigger box sound like the ideal, but what
>can i do in order to fall under the same mistake we are now trying to
>correct?

Choices:
1. Set mailbox limits. Let users manage their mailboxxen within those
limits however they choose.

2. Buy more servers until the cost of servers outstrips the value of
not managing mailbox resources.

3. Let the Exchange server fill up and crash.

4. Keep adding disk space and send memos to those in charge notifying
them of the increased restore times now required due to unmanaged
growth and point them to said memos when it takes 22 hours to do a
restore.

 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Andy Gate » Sat, 16 Oct 1999 04:00:00



>But backup, management and recovery isn't.  Increasing storage is the
simple
>answer, but do you want to backup or restore a 100gb info store just
because
>users are too lazy to delete stuff they don't need.

>Let's face it, 90% of what it there is rubbish people are too lazy too
clean
>up.  Set limits on your info store that prevent people sending once the
>mailbox gets to a certain size.

Oh, I agree absolutely!  But it looks as if this guy's managers have decided
that everyone should have all the mail space they want.  Mine have made a
similar decision, but luckily we're not a large company..!

    AndyG

 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Rich Matheise » Sat, 16 Oct 1999 04:00:00




>>My exchange server is growing out of control.  Is not the logs, is not
>>spamming is my own users how wish to keep their emails forever.  Company
>>policy doesn't allow us to deleted their old items.  We have tried archiving
>>(is not feasable), We try PST but they want centralize emails and PST don't
>>work welll over the network.  A bigger box sound like the ideal, but what
>>can i do in order to fall under the same mistake we are now trying to
>>correct?

>Choices:
>1. Set mailbox limits. Let users manage their mailboxxen within those
>limits however they choose.

Does anyone else see this strategy as a problem waiting to happen when
Exchange 2000 and the WebStore is used as a place to store everything?

Quote:>2. Buy more servers until the cost of servers outstrips the value of
>not managing mailbox resources.

Today that's true. Do you see a lot of that information _becoming_
valuable in the future?

------------------
Rich Matheisen
MCSE, Exchange MVP
MS Exchange FAQ at http://www.swinc.com/resource/exch_faq.htm

 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Kerr » Sat, 16 Oct 1999 04:00:00


How old is the stuff sitting on the server.  Anything older than a year
should be fair game.

Offer the management team a compromise.  Sometimes they think that if you do
something to some users, you have to do it to them to.  Let them know that
you'll leave their mailboxes alone and ask permissions to run cleanup
procedures for all other mailboxes for message older than one year.

If you have users with messages 2, 3, 4, or even 5 years old, then they
absolutely must be purged.  Sometimes you have to give management this
space, but all users aren't management.

Kerry


Quote:> My exchange server is growing out of control.  Is not the logs, is not
> spamming is my own users how wish to keep their emails forever.  Company
> policy doesn't allow us to deleted their old items.  We have tried
archiving
> (is not feasable), We try PST but they want centralize emails and PST
don't
> work welll over the network.  A bigger box sound like the ideal, but what
> can i do in order to fall under the same mistake we are now trying to
> correct?

> Despearte my exchange is about to quit!

> AL x

 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Chris Schar » Tue, 19 Oct 1999 04:00:00



have said:


>>Whenever anyone reaches their maximum, they are told that, if the item is
>>that important to them, save it either locally or to the network drive.  

>So what's the difference between a network drive and their mailbox?
>Considering a PST consumes more space to store the same item and to
>access the PST requires more network traffic your strategy seems
>counterproductive.

Saving import information locally or to a network drive generally
involves a PST file... which is inherently less reliable than the
Exchange store, so it seems to be a double whammy.
 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Chris Schar » Tue, 19 Oct 1999 04:00:00



have said:


>>>>Choices:
>>>>1. Set mailbox limits. Let users manage their mailboxxen within those
>>>>limits however they choose.

>>>Does anyone else see this strategy as a problem waiting to happen when
>>>Exchange 2000 and the WebStore is used as a place to store everything?

>>Yep. Users will use it as the ultimate dumping ground and demand
>>'unlimited' storage.... fortunately things appear to be a bit more
>>scalable (however I imagine demand will outstrip reasonable
>>scalability in a relatively short amount of time for most of us).

>How will that affect the storage already allocated for file servers?
>Will the data there be moved to the WebStore? Will it bemore useful if
>it's stored in a public folder than a home directory? How about a
>network share?

I don't know, that's a very good question. Since Exchange 2000 will
support multiple private information stores, will it be possible to
use one box instead of 10? And if so, for how long?

I know that in our case I don't think we're ready to commit to storing
the types and amounts of data our users create in that store. Other
pending complimentary technologies may make that somewhat more
palatable/ feasible, but I'm not sure to what extent one could scale
that.

Quote:>>>>2. Buy more servers until the cost of servers outstrips the value of
>>>>not managing mailbox resources.

>>>Today that's true. Do you see a lot of that information _becoming_
>>>valuable in the future?

>>Hmm... the 2 3MB AVI files I found in one of my users mailboxes today
>>will probably be just as useless 18 months from now....

>Will you continue to look at Exchange as only an e-mail system? This
>isn't only directed at you, Chris. I'm curious if other people see
>potential in what Exchange will be capable of doing.

Oh, I know, I'm hoping someone else will jump in with some ideas. My
experience is limited by, my experience. I'd like to see what others
are thinking as well.

Quote:>That AVI file isn't really what I was after. Most of us clamber for
>users to dump old mail, but will that mail (the useful stuff, not the
>stuff from Mom) be useful if it's given a place in the company and
>indexed so others can read and reference it? Places like town and
>county governments that have a requirement that all communications are
>public records, stuff like that.

I see your point, and in our situation we have a separate document
management system which is supposed to house and index that type of
information... never even opened the client interface for it. Watched
someone else use it once and cringed in horror. Integrating that with
an interface users access every day has some serious merit.

Quote:>That's the point. is all the stuff in the mailbox worthless? What
>about things like policies and procedures, engineering specs, etc.
>that are relegated to PST's rather than public folders and then just
>sit there while someone else reinvents the same stuff?

Well, the big push now is to put many of those object on an
intranet... in which case the webstore seems to be the logical
progression. However, it's not (yet) a robust enough document
management solution (IMHO) to be the Alpha and Omega document
repository.

--
Chris Scharff       ! One man with courage
Exchange Consultant ! makes a majority.
BV Solutions Group  ! - Andrew Jackson

ROT13 required for SMTP Address
Exchange FAQ: http://www.swinc.com/resource/exch_smtp.htm

 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Rich Matheise » Fri, 05 Nov 1999 04:00:00



>We've been using Exchange for about two years now and have found that users
>will always try to save stuff on the server, not realizing that each item,
>whether contact, task, appointment, or their email, contributes to their
>total allocation.  (Right now, each user is give 500K of space.)

500K?! Why bother? 50MB, maybe, but 500K? That's not enough to hold
very much at all.

Quote:>Whenever anyone reaches their maximum, they are told that, if the item is
>that important to them, save it either locally or to the network drive.  

So what's the difference between a network drive and their mailbox?
Considering a PST consumes more space to store the same item and to
access the PST requires more network traffic your strategy seems
counterproductive.

Quote:>We
>have instituted a backup policy where we will retain tape backups for one
>month.  All of that stuff then is burned onto CD-ROMs at the end of the
>month.  It may seem time-consuming, but the reality for us is that the items
>are saved for posterity.

>Just a thought ...

That's fine for Exchange 5.5, but I was asking about plans for
Exchange 2000 where the WebStore is accessible to applications, not
just to MAPI clients.

Not all users are packrats without good cause. I've got a lot of
"stuff" in my mailbox that's useful in things I do every day -- and
some of it's pretty old. It's also useful to other people I work with.
Unfortunately, it is in many different formats: word, excel, access,
mail, text files, hot fixes, executables, etc. It STAYS in my mailbox
because it's available no matter where I go and whether I'm connected
to Exchange or not. If that collection of "stuff" were indexed and
available to other people it could be pretty useful to them as well.

------------------
Rich Matheisen
MCSE, Exchange MVP
MS Exchange FAQ at http://www.swinc.com/resource/exch_faq.htm

 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Marc Kolla » Fri, 05 Nov 1999 04:00:00


Hi there!

We've been using Exchange for about two years now and have found that users
will always try to save stuff on the server, not realizing that each item,
whether contact, task, appointment, or their email, contributes to their
total allocation.  (Right now, each user is give 500K of space.)

Whenever anyone reaches their maximum, they are told that, if the item is
that important to them, save it either locally or to the network drive.  We
have instituted a backup policy where we will retain tape backups for one
month.  All of that stuff then is burned onto CD-ROMs at the end of the
month.  It may seem time-consuming, but the reality for us is that the items
are saved for posterity.

Just a thought ...

Marc C. Kollar


http://idt.net/~mkollar/

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Those who say it cannot be done should
not interrupt those who are doing it.
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-


[snipped comments]

 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Rich Matheise » Fri, 05 Nov 1999 04:00:00


                                        [ snip ]

Quote:>>>Choices:
>>>1. Set mailbox limits. Let users manage their mailboxxen within those
>>>limits however they choose.

>>Does anyone else see this strategy as a problem waiting to happen when
>>Exchange 2000 and the WebStore is used as a place to store everything?

>Yep. Users will use it as the ultimate dumping ground and demand
>'unlimited' storage.... fortunately things appear to be a bit more
>scalable (however I imagine demand will outstrip reasonable
>scalability in a relatively short amount of time for most of us).

How will that affect the storage already allocated for file servers?
Will the data there be moved to the WebStore? Will it bemore useful if
it's stored in a public folder than a home directory? How about a
network share?

Quote:>>>2. Buy more servers until the cost of servers outstrips the value of
>>>not managing mailbox resources.

>>Today that's true. Do you see a lot of that information _becoming_
>>valuable in the future?

>Hmm... the 2 3MB AVI files I found in one of my users mailboxes today
>will probably be just as useless 18 months from now....

Will you continue to look at Exchange as only an e-mail system? This
isn't only directed at you, Chris. I'm curious if other people see
potential in what Exchange will be capable of doing.

That AVI file isn't really what I was after. Most of us clamber for
users to dump old mail, but will that mail (the useful stuff, not the
stuff from Mom) be useful if it's given a place in the company and
indexed so others can read and reference it? Places like town and
county governments that have a requirement that all communications are
public records, stuff like that.

Quote:>but his
>mailbox will still be the same size (and he'll still be over his
>limit) unless he ditches the worthless stuff or (in our case) rents
>more space.

That's the point. is all the stuff in the mailbox worthless? What
about things like policies and procedures, engineering specs, etc.
that are relegated to PST's rather than public folders and then just
sit there while someone else reinvents the same stuff?

------------------
Rich Matheisen
MCSE, Exchange MVP
MS Exchange FAQ at http://www.swinc.com/resource/exch_faq.htm

 
 
 

Emails Out-Of-Control

Post by Chris Schar » Fri, 05 Nov 1999 04:00:00



have said:



>>>My exchange server is growing out of control.  Is not the logs, is not
>>>spamming is my own users how wish to keep their emails forever.  Company
>>>policy doesn't allow us to deleted their old items.  We have tried archiving
>>>(is not feasable), We try PST but they want centralize emails and PST don't
>>>work welll over the network.  A bigger box sound like the ideal, but what
>>>can i do in order to fall under the same mistake we are now trying to
>>>correct?

>>Choices:
>>1. Set mailbox limits. Let users manage their mailboxxen within those
>>limits however they choose.

>Does anyone else see this strategy as a problem waiting to happen when
>Exchange 2000 and the WebStore is used as a place to store everything?

Yep. Users will use it as the ultimate dumping ground and demand
'unlimited' storage.... fortunately things appear to be a bit more
scalable (however I imagine demand will outstrip reasonable
scalability in a relatively short amount of time for most of us).

Quote:>>2. Buy more servers until the cost of servers outstrips the value of
>>not managing mailbox resources.

>Today that's true. Do you see a lot of that information _becoming_
>valuable in the future?

Hmm... the 2 3MB AVI files I found in one of my users mailboxes today
will probably be just as useless 18 months from now.... but his
mailbox will still be the same size (and he'll still be over his
limit) unless he ditches the worthless stuff or (in our case) rents
more space.

--
Chris Scharff       ! The real winners in life are the
MVP Exchange        ! people who look at every situation
Exchange Consultant ! with an expectation that they can
BV Solutions Group  ! make it work or make it better.

ROT13 required for SMTP Address

 
 
 

1. Outlook time-outs to old server after importing with ExMerge

I am looking for the reason why Outlook shows me
the "Outlook is retrieving data from the Microsoft
Exchange Server ..." (See Q293650) message.

Our Exchange (2000 SP3) was recently hacked thru IIS
(yes, yes, I know...), and running low on resources
because of the worm... I ran exmerge and got all
mailboxes out. I chose to export all data and all
associated data.

After reloading the server, using a different name for
the server, a different organisation, and a different
site (You could say that nothing but the license is the
same as it was), I imported the mailboxes. Next thing:
When creating a folder in one of the imported mailboxes,
I got this time-out message (duh, the old server isn't
there anymore). It didn't matter at what level in the
mailbox-folders, or what type of folder. I deleted all
mailboxes, used SendAs/ReceiveAs priveleges to access
newly created (empty) mailboxes for each user, and
started copying the PST's manually. Problem: Copying the
content from one PST to a mailbox caused the same message
(Time-out to the old 'non-existing'-server). I noticed
this occured especially with Hotmail-messages and Spam,
but it also occured on some non-email items (calender,
tasks, etc...)
What I want to know is why outlook still wants to contact
the old server, and how I can fix this. Let me know if

Greetz...

2. Private information store/mailbox resourses query

3. E2K SMTP Time outs like Exchange 5.5?

4. Post SP1 patch cause IMAP service stop functioning correctly?!

5. OWA and time outs

6. Telex Connector for Exchange?

7. Message Time outs

8. Exch 5.5 (IS error)

9. Dial up time-outs

10. Outlook time-outs to old server after importing with ExMerge

11. OWA times-outs with XLS and DOC Attachments

12. Server time outs

13. Print outs of messages