MVP is a job from Microsoft ?

MVP is a job from Microsoft ?

Post by Eyal » Sat, 08 Jun 2002 02:57:58



Sorry for my english
how do you get MVP is it political issue ?
does mvp get paid ?
how do i get this title ?
 
 
 

MVP is a job from Microsoft ?

Post by John Eddy - M » Sat, 08 Jun 2002 03:34:39




Quote:> Sorry for my english
> how do you get MVP is it political issue ?
> does mvp get paid ?
> how do i get this title ?

Eyal,

MVPs are volunteers who help out other users here in the public forums
and in Exchange mailing lists as well.  MVP isn't a role so much as it
is an award for support and service to the community at large.

While critics of the program would say it is a political issue, I can
only try to assure you that it is not. I have not ever been forced to
make someone an MVP.  The general process of someone receiving a MVP
award starts with a nomination.  That nomination can come from a
Microsoft employee who participates in forums (note that none of this is
Exchange specific), from other MVP award recipients, or even by the
users in the forums who receive help.  When the nominations come
through, the MVP Lead (I'm the MVP Lead for Exchange and Outlook) will
review the nominees body of work.  Did they actually help the community
at large?  Were they consistent in their help?  This might lead you to
the question of 'Is quantity important?'  Well, much as I hate to say
it, yes, it is.  Someone doesn't receive an MVP award for answering one
post.  It would weaken the value of the award.  But, on the other hand,
quality is important as well.  Answering a thousand posts a month
doesn't do anything if all the answers are wrong or not helpful.

Do the MVPs get paid?  No.  MVP is strictly an award for people who give
of their own time in the Exchange Community.

How do you get this title?  I'm glad you asked.  Help people.  Give back
to the Exchange community.  Become known within the community as someone
who is helpful and intelligent.

John Eddy
Exchange Communities Lead
--
Note: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers
no rights.

 
 
 

MVP is a job from Microsoft ?

Post by Drew » Sat, 08 Jun 2002 03:59:24


it is in many ways an honorific. You are recognized by both Microsoft and
your peers for your skills in [enter program/technology here] but also your
ability to work with people to resolve problems and work them through
troubleshooting. You can't buy a MVP, and that is what makes it so
important-Drew



Quote:> through, the MVP Lead (I'm the MVP Lead for Exchange and Outlook) will
> review the nominees body of work.  Did they actually help the community
> at large?  Were they consistent in their help?  This might lead you to
> the question of 'Is quantity important?'  Well, much as I hate to say
> it, yes, it is.  Someone doesn't receive an MVP award for answering one
> post.

 
 
 

MVP is a job from Microsoft ?

Post by Lee Derbyshir » Sat, 08 Jun 2002 04:38:16


Hi John.

Is it a lifetime thing, or can it be revoked if someone dries up a bit?

Lee.

--
________________________________

Outlook Web Access for PDA and WAP:
www.leederbyshire.com
________________________________





> > Sorry for my english
> > how do you get MVP is it political issue ?
> > does mvp get paid ?
> > how do i get this title ?

> Eyal,

> MVPs are volunteers who help out other users here in the public forums
> and in Exchange mailing lists as well.  MVP isn't a role so much as it
> is an award for support and service to the community at large.

> While critics of the program would say it is a political issue, I can
> only try to assure you that it is not. I have not ever been forced to
> make someone an MVP.  The general process of someone receiving a MVP
> award starts with a nomination.  That nomination can come from a
> Microsoft employee who participates in forums (note that none of this is
> Exchange specific), from other MVP award recipients, or even by the
> users in the forums who receive help.  When the nominations come
> through, the MVP Lead (I'm the MVP Lead for Exchange and Outlook) will
> review the nominees body of work.  Did they actually help the community
> at large?  Were they consistent in their help?  This might lead you to
> the question of 'Is quantity important?'  Well, much as I hate to say
> it, yes, it is.  Someone doesn't receive an MVP award for answering one
> post.  It would weaken the value of the award.  But, on the other hand,
> quality is important as well.  Answering a thousand posts a month
> doesn't do anything if all the answers are wrong or not helpful.

> Do the MVPs get paid?  No.  MVP is strictly an award for people who give
> of their own time in the Exchange Community.

> How do you get this title?  I'm glad you asked.  Help people.  Give back
> to the Exchange community.  Become known within the community as someone
> who is helpful and intelligent.

> John Eddy
> Exchange Communities Lead
> --
> Note: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers
> no rights.

 
 
 

MVP is a job from Microsoft ?

Post by John Eddy - M » Sat, 08 Jun 2002 05:17:01


Yes.

Consider it akin to an Oscar.  Jack Lemmon won in 1973 for Save the
Tiger.  It doesn't mean he'll win it every year.  But he will always be
an Oscar award recipient for Best Male Lead in 1973.

As I said, MVP is an award, not a title.  There is precedent in the past
for people refusing the award, or 'returning' the award mid year.  And
just because you are noted by your peers for help in one year, doesn't
mean you are going to keep getting an MVP award for the rest of time.  
You need to keep assisting people.

John Eddy
Exchange Communities PM



> Hi John.

> Is it a lifetime thing, or can it be revoked if someone dries up a bit?

> Lee.

> --
> ________________________________

> Outlook Web Access for PDA and WAP:
> www.leederbyshire.com
> ________________________________





> > > Sorry for my english
> > > how do you get MVP is it political issue ?
> > > does mvp get paid ?
> > > how do i get this title ?

> > Eyal,

> > MVPs are volunteers who help out other users here in the public forums
> > and in Exchange mailing lists as well.  MVP isn't a role so much as it
> > is an award for support and service to the community at large.

> > While critics of the program would say it is a political issue, I can
> > only try to assure you that it is not. I have not ever been forced to
> > make someone an MVP.  The general process of someone receiving a MVP
> > award starts with a nomination.  That nomination can come from a
> > Microsoft employee who participates in forums (note that none of this is
> > Exchange specific), from other MVP award recipients, or even by the
> > users in the forums who receive help.  When the nominations come
> > through, the MVP Lead (I'm the MVP Lead for Exchange and Outlook) will
> > review the nominees body of work.  Did they actually help the community
> > at large?  Were they consistent in their help?  This might lead you to
> > the question of 'Is quantity important?'  Well, much as I hate to say
> > it, yes, it is.  Someone doesn't receive an MVP award for answering one
> > post.  It would weaken the value of the award.  But, on the other hand,
> > quality is important as well.  Answering a thousand posts a month
> > doesn't do anything if all the answers are wrong or not helpful.

> > Do the MVPs get paid?  No.  MVP is strictly an award for people who give
> > of their own time in the Exchange Community.

> > How do you get this title?  I'm glad you asked.  Help people.  Give back

 
 
 

MVP is a job from Microsoft ?

Post by Lee Derbyshir » Sat, 08 Jun 2002 05:35:02


Sounds fair enough. Thanks for the info.

BTW; Jack Lemmon was superb, was he not?

Lee.

--
________________________________

Outlook Web Access for PDA and WAP:
www.leederbyshire.com
________________________________



> Yes.

> Consider it akin to an Oscar.  Jack Lemmon won in 1973 for Save the
> Tiger.  It doesn't mean he'll win it every year.  But he will always be
> an Oscar award recipient for Best Male Lead in 1973.

> As I said, MVP is an award, not a title.  There is precedent in the past
> for people refusing the award, or 'returning' the award mid year.  And
> just because you are noted by your peers for help in one year, doesn't
> mean you are going to keep getting an MVP award for the rest of time.
> You need to keep assisting people.

> John Eddy
> Exchange Communities PM



> > Hi John.

> > Is it a lifetime thing, or can it be revoked if someone dries up a bit?

> > Lee.

> > --
> > ________________________________

> > Outlook Web Access for PDA and WAP:
> > www.leederbyshire.com
> > ________________________________





> > > > Sorry for my english
> > > > how do you get MVP is it political issue ?
> > > > does mvp get paid ?
> > > > how do i get this title ?

> > > Eyal,

> > > MVPs are volunteers who help out other users here in the public forums
> > > and in Exchange mailing lists as well.  MVP isn't a role so much as it
> > > is an award for support and service to the community at large.

> > > While critics of the program would say it is a political issue, I can
> > > only try to assure you that it is not. I have not ever been forced to
> > > make someone an MVP.  The general process of someone receiving a MVP
> > > award starts with a nomination.  That nomination can come from a
> > > Microsoft employee who participates in forums (note that none of this
is
> > > Exchange specific), from other MVP award recipients, or even by the
> > > users in the forums who receive help.  When the nominations come
> > > through, the MVP Lead (I'm the MVP Lead for Exchange and Outlook) will
> > > review the nominees body of work.  Did they actually help the
community
> > > at large?  Were they consistent in their help?  This might lead you to
> > > the question of 'Is quantity important?'  Well, much as I hate to say
> > > it, yes, it is.  Someone doesn't receive an MVP award for answering
one
> > > post.  It would weaken the value of the award.  But, on the other
hand,
> > > quality is important as well.  Answering a thousand posts a month
> > > doesn't do anything if all the answers are wrong or not helpful.

> > > Do the MVPs get paid?  No.  MVP is strictly an award for people who
give
> > > of their own time in the Exchange Community.

> > > How do you get this title?  I'm glad you asked.  Help people.  Give

back
 
 
 

MVP is a job from Microsoft ?

Post by Eyal » Sat, 08 Jun 2002 06:35:21


How do I know if I am a hominy ?
Does there any list of nominees ?

How long does I take to become an MVP  ?,
I can see people answering hundreds of mails for month
and still I do not see MVP signature in their mails .

Quote:>-----Original Message-----

>Yes.

>Consider it akin to an Oscar.  Jack Lemmon won in 1973
for Save the
>Tiger.  It doesn't mean he'll win it every year.  But he
will always be
>an Oscar award recipient for Best Male Lead in 1973.

>As I said, MVP is an award, not a title.  There is

precedent in the past
Quote:>for people refusing the award, or 'returning' the award
mid year.  And
>just because you are noted by your peers for help in one
year, doesn't
>mean you are going to keep getting an MVP award for the
rest of time.  
>You need to keep assisting people.

>John Eddy
>Exchange Communities PM

>In article <1023392212.11878.0.nnrp-



>> Hi John.

>> Is it a lifetime thing, or can it be revoked if someone
dries up a bit?

>> Lee.

>> --
>> ________________________________

>> Outlook Web Access for PDA and WAP:
>> www.leederbyshire.com
>> ________________________________


message

>> > In article <a7c901c20d83$b118e1f0


- Show quoted text -


>> > > Sorry for my english
>> > > how do you get MVP is it political issue ?
>> > > does mvp get paid ?
>> > > how do i get this title ?

>> > Eyal,

>> > MVPs are volunteers who help out other users here in
the public forums
>> > and in Exchange mailing lists as well.  MVP isn't a
role so much as it
>> > is an award for support and service to the community
at large.

>> > While critics of the program would say it is a

political issue, I can
Quote:>> > only try to assure you that it is not. I have not
ever been forced to
>> > make someone an MVP.  The general process of someone
receiving a MVP
>> > award starts with a nomination.  That nomination can
come from a
>> > Microsoft employee who participates in forums (note

that none of this is

- Show quoted text -

Quote:>> > Exchange specific), from other MVP award recipients,
or even by the
>> > users in the forums who receive help.  When the
nominations come
>> > through, the MVP Lead (I'm the MVP Lead for Exchange
and Outlook) will
>> > review the nominees body of work.  Did they actually
help the community
>> > at large?  Were they consistent in their help?  This
might lead you to
>> > the question of 'Is quantity important?'  Well, much
as I hate to say
>> > it, yes, it is.  Someone doesn't receive an MVP award
for answering one
>> > post.  It would weaken the value of the award.  But,
on the other hand,
>> > quality is important as well.  Answering a thousand
posts a month
>> > doesn't do anything if all the answers are wrong or
not helpful.

>> > Do the MVPs get paid?  No.  MVP is strictly an award
for people who give
>> > of their own time in the Exchange Community.

>> > How do you get this title?  I'm glad you asked.  Help
people.  Give back
>.

 
 
 

MVP is a job from Microsoft ?

Post by John Eddy - M » Sat, 08 Jun 2002 08:46:45


There are no public lists of people nominated for the MVP Award.  The
only way you would know that you were in consideration would be if the
person nominating you told you or did it publically.  Some MVP Leads
might tell people they are considering for the award, but it is not the
normal course of action as it could lead to ill will if it is decided
the person should not get the award.

How long does it take?  Well, since the MVP Award is an award for a
years worth of activity, one could say that it takes at least a year.  
To quote a great man, 'for some it takes a year, for others, a
lifetime.'

Also, keep in mind that MVPs are not required to label themselves as
such, but we greatly encourage them to as we in the MVP Program really
think it is something to brag about.

Just as a further comment, to answer the subject question:  Is MVP a job
within Microsoft, most specifically no.  In fact, employees of Microsoft
are not eligible to become MVP Award recipients.

John Eddy
Exchange Communities PM

PS: Although it could be considered nitpicking, remember that Usenet is
not mail. Items you read on Usenet are considered posts, although there
are some NNTP to Email gateways out there that would enable you to read
these messages in a mail reader.



Quote:> How do I know if I am a hominy ?
> Does there any list of nominees ?

> How long does I take to become an MVP  ?,
> I can see people answering hundreds of mails for month
> and still I do not see MVP signature in their mails .

> >-----Original Message-----

> >Yes.

> >Consider it akin to an Oscar.  Jack Lemmon won in 1973
> for Save the
> >Tiger.  It doesn't mean he'll win it every year.  But he
> will always be
> >an Oscar award recipient for Best Male Lead in 1973.

> >As I said, MVP is an award, not a title.  There is
> precedent in the past
> >for people refusing the award, or 'returning' the award
> mid year.  And
> >just because you are noted by your peers for help in one
> year, doesn't
> >mean you are going to keep getting an MVP award for the
> rest of time.  
> >You need to keep assisting people.

> >John Eddy
> >Exchange Communities PM

 
 
 

MVP is a job from Microsoft ?

Post by Eyal » Sat, 08 Jun 2002 21:09:43


Thanks for making this issue clear for me and others.

Quote:>-----Original Message-----

>There are no public lists of people nominated for the MVP
Award.  The
>only way you would know that you were in consideration
would be if the
>person nominating you told you or did it publically.  
Some MVP Leads
>might tell people they are considering for the award, but
it is not the
>normal course of action as it could lead to ill will if
it is decided
>the person should not get the award.

>How long does it take?  Well, since the MVP Award is an
award for a
>years worth of activity, one could say that it takes at
least a year.  
>To quote a great man, 'for some it takes a year, for
others, a
>lifetime.'

>Also, keep in mind that MVPs are not required to label
themselves as
>such, but we greatly encourage them to as we in the MVP
Program really
>think it is something to brag about.

>Just as a further comment, to answer the subject

question:  Is MVP a job
Quote:>within Microsoft, most specifically no.  In fact,

employees of Microsoft

- Show quoted text -

>are not eligible to become MVP Award recipients.

>John Eddy
>Exchange Communities PM

>PS: Although it could be considered nitpicking, remember
that Usenet is
>not mail. Items you read on Usenet are considered posts,
although there
>are some NNTP to Email gateways out there that would
enable you to read
>these messages in a mail reader.



>> How do I know if I am a hominy ?
>> Does there any list of nominees ?

>> How long does I take to become an MVP  ?,
>> I can see people answering hundreds of mails for month
>> and still I do not see MVP signature in their mails .

>> >-----Original Message-----

>> >Yes.

>> >Consider it akin to an Oscar.  Jack Lemmon won in 1973
>> for Save the
>> >Tiger.  It doesn't mean he'll win it every year.  But
he
>> will always be
>> >an Oscar award recipient for Best Male Lead in 1973.

>> >As I said, MVP is an award, not a title.  There is
>> precedent in the past
>> >for people refusing the award, or 'returning' the
award
>> mid year.  And
>> >just because you are noted by your peers for help in
one
>> year, doesn't
>> >mean you are going to keep getting an MVP award for
the
>> rest of time.  
>> >You need to keep assisting people.

>> >John Eddy
>> >Exchange Communities PM

>.

 
 
 

MVP is a job from Microsoft ?

Post by Lanwenc » Wed, 12 Jun 2002 22:14:46


You know you're a hominy if people call you "Grits". :-)


> How do I know if I am a hominy ?
> Does there any list of nominees ?

> How long does I take to become an MVP  ?,
> I can see people answering hundreds of mails for month
> and still I do not see MVP signature in their mails .

> >-----Original Message-----

> >Yes.

> >Consider it akin to an Oscar.  Jack Lemmon won in 1973
> for Save the
> >Tiger.  It doesn't mean he'll win it every year.  But he
> will always be
> >an Oscar award recipient for Best Male Lead in 1973.

> >As I said, MVP is an award, not a title.  There is
> precedent in the past
> >for people refusing the award, or 'returning' the award
> mid year.  And
> >just because you are noted by your peers for help in one
> year, doesn't
> >mean you are going to keep getting an MVP award for the
> rest of time.
> >You need to keep assisting people.

> >John Eddy
> >Exchange Communities PM

> >In article <1023392212.11878.0.nnrp-


> >> Hi John.

> >> Is it a lifetime thing, or can it be revoked if someone
> dries up a bit?

> >> Lee.

> >> --
> >> ________________________________

> >> Outlook Web Access for PDA and WAP:
> >> www.leederbyshire.com
> >> ________________________________


> message

> >> > In article <a7c901c20d83$b118e1f0


> >> > > Sorry for my english
> >> > > how do you get MVP is it political issue ?
> >> > > does mvp get paid ?
> >> > > how do i get this title ?

> >> > Eyal,

> >> > MVPs are volunteers who help out other users here in
> the public forums
> >> > and in Exchange mailing lists as well.  MVP isn't a
> role so much as it
> >> > is an award for support and service to the community
> at large.

> >> > While critics of the program would say it is a
> political issue, I can
> >> > only try to assure you that it is not. I have not
> ever been forced to
> >> > make someone an MVP.  The general process of someone
> receiving a MVP
> >> > award starts with a nomination.  That nomination can
> come from a
> >> > Microsoft employee who participates in forums (note
> that none of this is
> >> > Exchange specific), from other MVP award recipients,
> or even by the
> >> > users in the forums who receive help.  When the
> nominations come
> >> > through, the MVP Lead (I'm the MVP Lead for Exchange
> and Outlook) will
> >> > review the nominees body of work.  Did they actually
> help the community
> >> > at large?  Were they consistent in their help?  This
> might lead you to
> >> > the question of 'Is quantity important?'  Well, much
> as I hate to say
> >> > it, yes, it is.  Someone doesn't receive an MVP award
> for answering one
> >> > post.  It would weaken the value of the award.  But,
> on the other hand,
> >> > quality is important as well.  Answering a thousand
> posts a month
> >> > doesn't do anything if all the answers are wrong or
> not helpful.

> >> > Do the MVPs get paid?  No.  MVP is strictly an award
> for people who give
> >> > of their own time in the Exchange Community.

> >> > How do you get this title?  I'm glad you asked.  Help
> people.  Give back
> >.

 
 
 

1. Microsoft Exchange 2000 server problem - My job depends on IT.

1. I have a LAN with 2 win 2000 servers
2. One of them is the PDC and the same computer has Exchange 2000
server installed
3. Everything was working fine
4. I was just checking the system and accidentally selected the "last
known good option"
5. The system started off normally
6. Clients are not able to access the exchange server
7. When I checked the services, exchange routing .. was started and
the rest were not started
8. When I tried to start the exchange system attendant service the
system displays a message "Could not start the Microsoft Exchange
System Attendant service on local computer. The service did not return
an error. This could be an internal Windows error or an internal
service error. if the problem persists, contact your system
administrator"

I need to get the exchange server up and working ASAP.

My job depends on IT.

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