Books for a beginner.

Books for a beginner.

Post by Ben » Thu, 22 Nov 2001 22:44:29



Hi, I know this has been discussed here before, BUT...

 I'm about to start learning C++, I would say that I am already pretty
comfortable with Java and have used a few other languages (Pascal, Modula 2,
C - but not properly :-), basic - eurghhh etc.).

Does anybody have any recommendations?  I think a book that discusses the
lower level stuff like memory management pointers, references etc. but
assumes knowledge of basic OOP design would be ideal.

I've already purchased Stroustrup "The C++ Programming Language" Third
Edition and Koenig & Moo, "Accelerated C++" is on it's way...  wise choices?

Thanks,
Ben.
--
I'm not just a number.  To many, I'm known as a string...

 
 
 

Books for a beginner.

Post by Attila Fehe » Thu, 22 Nov 2001 23:24:42



> Hi, I know this has been discussed here before, BUT...

>  I'm about to start learning C++, I would say that I am already pretty
> comfortable with Java and have used a few other languages (Pascal, Modula 2,
> C - but not properly :-), basic - eurghhh etc.).

> Does anybody have any recommendations?  I think a book that discusses the
> lower level stuff like memory management pointers, references etc. but
> assumes knowledge of basic OOP design would be ideal.

Start with Accelerated C++.  Continue with Effective C++ from Meyers.
Have the Stroustrup 3rd or Special Edition plus the Josuttis book as
references for the language.  As you go on you want to read: More
Effective C++, Effective STL, Exceptional C++ (soon More...),
Ruminations on C++ is nice as well...

And finally, when you think you know something about C++, buy Andrei's
book: Modern C++ design.  Before you start reading it, insure your and
brain and compiler... they might break few times in the effort :-)))

(Eff.C++ and More Eff.C++ you can buy together on a nice CD)

Quote:> I've already purchased Stroustrup "The C++ Programming Language" Third
> Edition and Koenig & Moo, "Accelerated C++" is on it's way...  wise choices?

Start with Acc++, then take Effective C++.  Stroustrup is good, but if
you want a jump-start, it is too heavy.  It is a good reference,
though.  For reference get Josuttis, too.

Some more I have read and liked and did not forget to mention: Design
and evolution of C++, Efficient C++.

Many suggests readind C++ Primer 3rd ed. etc.

 
 
 

Books for a beginner.

Post by Paul Johns » Thu, 22 Nov 2001 23:32:26


Hiya,

On Wed, 21 Nov 2001 13:44:29 -0000, "Ben"


>I've already purchased Stroustrup "The C++ Programming Language" Third
>Edition and Koenig & Moo, "Accelerated C++" is on it's way...  wise choices?

Definately.

Avoid anything with the words "Herb Schildt is a renouned authority"
(or words to that effect - infact, anything with the name Herb Schildt
should be avoided!)...

http://www.accu.org also has plenty of recommendations.

TTFN

Paul
--
All opinions expressed here are mine and may not reflect
those of any other person or company

 
 
 

Books for a beginner.

Post by Ben » Fri, 23 Nov 2001 17:46:41


Thanks guys, I think that helps a lot.  From what I've gathered, I have a
good starting point and a good reference.

If I were to buy all of the books mentioned, and read them, and understand
them, I could probably call myself a C++ guru.  A skint C++ guru.   :-)

Cheers, the booklist is saved on my desktop for future reference...

Ben
--
I'm not just a number.  To many, I'm known as a string...