How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by victor kam » Fri, 26 Jan 1996 04:00:00





> Can Win95 act as a gateway for IP?  If so, how is this done?  We
> tried setting one machine's gateway setting to a machine outside
> our immediate local net, and have all other machines point at that one
> as the gateway; doesn't seem to work.  The "gateway wannabe" can see
> the outside, and the other machines can see the wannabe, but not the
> outside.

See my previous post on this topic. You COULD try WinGate, which is an add-on
to Win'95 which is claimed to allow IP routing. I THINK that a downloadable test
version allows one machine to route for a SINGLE other. If you want more than that,
you'll have to buy the full WinGate product, or use NT as your router.


 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by Richard Charles Grav » Fri, 26 Jan 1996 04:00:00



>Can Win95 act as a gateway for IP?  If so, how is this done?  We
>tried setting one machine's gateway setting to a machine outside
>our immediate local net, and have all other machines point at that one
>as the gateway; doesn't seem to work.  The "gateway wannabe" can see
>the outside, and the other machines can see the wannabe, but not the
>outside.

Win95 cannot act as a gateway. The "EnableRouting" switch is very
misleadingly named.

There is a proxy server called WinGate that might do what you want. It was
designed for dialup, but it should work over any two interfaces. From the
FAQ (below):

  D.21. How can multiple machines share one dialup TCP/IP connection?
Date: Mon, 16 Oct 1995 16:46:22 -0700


   [With all due respect to Adrien, I really think Win95 is the wrong
   tool for the job. A dedicated DOS-based router, like the ones
   mentioned in the FAQ for comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc, would give
   better performance on much cheaper hardware. Of course, the user
   interface would be nowhere hear as pretty, which is why WinGate is the
   right tool for most "normal" people.]

   Adrien wrote the very cool proxy server WinGate for this purpose. It
   runs under Win95 or WinNT. Get it from
   http://nz.com/NZ/Commerce/creative-cgi/special/qbik/wingate.htm.

   For those of you who don't know the jargon, a proxy server lets you
   use common TCP applications like mail, telnet, ftp, and the Web by
   going through an intermediate site. Proxy servers are often used by
   corporate sites for security and bandwidth control. It occurred to
   Adrien that they're also a convenient way for home and small business
   users to share a single Internet address.

   A proxy server is not a router, which passes all packets from one
   network to another. So you can't ping or use SNMP through WinGate, but
   you should be able to do what most normal people do on the net.

-rich

 ftp://ftp.stanford.edu/pub/mailing-lists/win95netbugs/
 gopher://quixote.stanford.edu/1m/win95netbugs
 http://www-leland.stanford.edu/~llurch/win95netbugs/faq.html

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by Norman H Samuelso » Fri, 26 Jan 1996 04:00:00



> Can Win95 act as a gateway for IP?  If so, how is this done?  We
> tried setting one machine's gateway setting to a machine outside
> our immediate local net, and have all other machines point at that one
> as the gateway; doesn't seem to work.  The "gateway wannabe" can see
> the outside, and the other machines can see the wannabe, but not the
> outside.

Sorry, but the Microsoft stack in Win95 does not do IP forwarding.
You cant use it as a gateway.  There is a product called WinGate
that will allow the other machines on your LAN to access the net thru
the dialup, but it acts like a proxy server, not as a gateway.

- Norm -


Samuelson Consulting               510-449-3048
Livermore, CA                      http://web.aimnet.com/~nhs/

Consulting services for Windows Internet users

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by Kenneth T » Fri, 26 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Can Win95 act as a gateway for IP?  If so, how is this done?  We
tried setting one machine's gateway setting to a machine outside
our immediate local net, and have all other machines point at that one
as the gateway; doesn't seem to work.  The "gateway wannabe" can see
the outside, and the other machines can see the wannabe, but not the
outside.

"If you want to do buzzword oriented programming, you    \\\//
 must use a strongly hyped language.."  -unknown         (O O)
-----------------------------------------------------oOo--(_)--oOo--------

Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering
University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont. Canada

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by John Ga » Sun, 28 Jan 1996 04:00:00




} >
} >Can Win95 act as a gateway for IP?  If so, how is this done?  We
} >tried setting one machine's gateway setting to a machine outside
} >our immediate local net, and have all other machines point at that one
} >as the gateway; doesn't seem to work.  The "gateway wannabe" can see
} >the outside, and the other machines can see the wannabe, but not the
} >outside.
}
} Win95 cannot act as a gateway. The "EnableRouting" switch is very
} misleadingly named.
}
} There is a proxy server called WinGate that might do what you want. It was
} designed for dialup, but it should work over any two interfaces. From the
} FAQ (below):
}
}   D.21. How can multiple machines share one dialup TCP/IP connection?
} Date: Mon, 16 Oct 1995 16:46:22 -0700


}
}    [With all due respect to Adrien, I really think Win95 is the wrong
}    tool for the job. A dedicated DOS-based router, like the ones
}    mentioned in the FAQ for comp.protocols.tcp-ip.ibmpc, would give
}    better performance on much cheaper hardware. Of course, the user
}    interface would be nowhere hear as pretty, which is why WinGate is the
}    right tool for most "normal" people.]
}
}    Adrien wrote the very cool proxy server WinGate for this purpose. It
}    runs under Win95 or WinNT. Get it from
}    http://nz.com/NZ/Commerce/creative-cgi/special/qbik/wingate.htm.
}
}    For those of you who don't know the jargon, a proxy server lets you
}    use common TCP applications like mail, telnet, ftp, and the Web by
}    going through an intermediate site. Proxy servers are often used by
}    corporate sites for security and bandwidth control. It occurred to
}    Adrien that they're also a convenient way for home and small business
}    users to share a single Internet address.
}
}    A proxy server is not a router, which passes all packets from one
}    network to another. So you can't ping or use SNMP through WinGate, but
}    you should be able to do what most normal people do on the net.
}
} -rich

}  ftp://ftp.stanford.edu/pub/mailing-lists/win95netbugs/
}  gopher://quixote.stanford.edu/1m/win95netbugs
}  http://www-leland.stanford.edu/~llurch/win95netbugs/faq.html

I noticed that there is a "route" command accessible from the command line. I'm
wondering what this is for, and how it is used. I know that route is used to
manage routing tables in NT. Is it the same with 95? Is there something that MS
isn't telling us?

As usual, I'm trying to do the impossible. I have however learned more from my
attempts than any other way. I am convinced that there is some way to get 95 to
route IP without going to third party products. If I am wrong I will admit to it
quickly here. I will also listen to anyone with ideas or suggestions.

John

<Posted and emailed>

------------------------------------------------------
You only lose when you stop trying
------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by Richard Charles Grav » Sun, 28 Jan 1996 04:00:00





>} >
>} >Can Win95 act as a gateway for IP?  If so, how is this done?  We
>}...
>} Win95 cannot act as a gateway. The "EnableRouting" switch is very
>} misleadingly named.
>...
>I noticed that there is a "route" command accessible from the command line. I'm
>wondering what this is for, and how it is used. I know that route is used to
>manage routing tables in NT. Is it the same with 95? Is there something that MS
>isn't telling us?

They're not hiding cool features that work wonderfully, if that's what
you mean.

route.exe is supposed to let you set static routes so that you can be a
*client* of multiple default routers. It does not route packets. It
doesn't even work very well for what it's supposed to do -- the problems
start with the typo in the help screen. (Run route /? and note "if" where
it should read "it". No, it's not short for "interface." This will
reportedly be fixed in Windows 95a, out in a couple weeks.)

Quote:>As usual, I'm trying to do the impossible. I have however learned more from my
>attempts than any other way. I am convinced that there is some way to get 95 to
>route IP without going to third party products. If I am wrong I will admit to it
>quickly here. I will also listen to anyone with ideas or suggestions.

You're wrong.

Win95 would be a terrible platform for routing software anyway. Lots of
overhead, poor performance.

Linux is free. Get it.

-rich

 ftp://ftp.stanford.edu/pub/mailing-lists/win95netbugs/
 gopher://quixote.stanford.edu/1m/win95netbugs
 http://www-leland.stanford.edu/~llurch/win95netbugs/faq.html

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by Luis Uribar » Thu, 01 Feb 1996 04:00:00


I have spent the last several days setting up our LAN using TCP/IP to
access the internet this way, and here is what I have discovered.

1. Windows 95 can't actually route packats, (However Windows NT can)
either way, it is more that likely that you will HAVE to use wingate as
a proxy server on you windows 95 (or NT) machine  for the following
reasons.

a. Unless your ISP has provided each and every machine with a VALID IP
address and Name registered with InterNIC, you cannot acrually route
packats from you LAN to the internet and BACK.

(I set up my LAN with the private addresses 192.168.0.x) {this is NOT a
valid INTERNET adress, only valid within the LAN} then set up NT to
route the packats. As expected, the packats get routed outward from the
LAN, but never come back. (Using PING).

 The reason for this is that every machine on the LAN does NOT have a
valid INTERNET adress, so packets comming back from the Internet never
get routed back to thier respective machines.

This is where Wingate comes in, it allows you to connect your LAN to the
internet, (with some configuration). Wingate acts as proxie server,
alowing programs such as eudora, ftp, Netscape to access the internet
from the LAN.

Check out:
http://nz.com/NZ/Commerce/creative-cgi/special/qbik/wingate.htm

Unless you have VALID InterNIC Registered IP Adresses and Names for each
machine on your LAN, you will not be able to connect you LAN to the
internet without Wingate.

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by Norman H Samuelso » Thu, 01 Feb 1996 04:00:00



> I keep seeing this thread resurface - "How do I get my Win95 machine to
> do routing". I have the same problem, and in the end installed NT as a
> second OS on my server machine purely for it's TCP/IP routing function.

> My question is, can someone write a program for Win95 that does this? Is
> it possible? It seems that people are screaming out for it and I'm suprised
> that someone hasn't done it yet if it's possible. It doesn't have to
> be anything elaborate. In fact, the simpler the better.

> If it was shareware, I'd register.

The answer is always the same, at least when it is correct.  No, Win95
will not do IP forwarding.  It will not do routing.  It cannot be used as
a gateway.  It is not possible to write a program that runs on top of any
stack that will do routing, which must be done inside the stack.  If you
want a gateway, get NT or PCROUTE or one of the commercial TCP/IP stacks
that can do it.

The only alternative I know of for Win95 is WinGate.  It acts as a proxy
server.  Incoming packets go to WinGate, which makes another connection,
using the IP address of the other side of the machine.

- Norm -


Samuelson Consulting               510-449-3048
Livermore, CA                      http://web.aimnet.com/~nhs/

Consulting services for Windows Internet users

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by David Am » Thu, 01 Feb 1996 04:00:00





>> Can Win95 act as a gateway for IP?  If so, how is this done?  We
>> tried setting one machine's gateway setting to a machine outside
>> our immediate local net, and have all other machines point at that one
>> as the gateway; doesn't seem to work.  The "gateway wannabe" can see
>> the outside, and the other machines can see the wannabe, but not the
>> outside.

>See my previous post on this topic. You COULD try WinGate, which is an add-on
>to Win'95 which is claimed to allow IP routing. I THINK that a downloadable
test
>version allows one machine to route for a SINGLE other. If you want more than
that,
>you'll have to buy the full WinGate product, or use NT as your router.



I keep seeing this thread resurface - "How do I get my Win95 machine to
do routing". I have the same problem, and in the end installed NT as a
second OS on my server machine purely for it's TCP/IP routing function.

My question is, can someone write a program for Win95 that does this? Is
it possible? It seems that people are screaming out for it and I'm suprised
that someone hasn't done it yet if it's possible. It doesn't have to
be anything elaborate. In fact, the simpler the better.

If it was shareware, I'd register.

--
========================================================
= David Amor      = Opinions expressed are mine and    =
= Electronic Arts = do not necessarily reflect the     =

========================================================

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by Mithrandi » Fri, 02 Feb 1996 04:00:00






> >} >
> >} >Can Win95 act as a gateway for IP?  If so, how is this done?  We
> >}...
> >} Win95 cannot act as a gateway. The "EnableRouting" switch is very
> >} misleadingly named.
> >...
> >I noticed that there is a "route" command accessible from the command line. I'm
> >wondering what this is for, and how it is used. I know that route is used to
> >manage routing tables in NT. Is it the same with 95? Is there something that MS
> >isn't telling us?

> They're not hiding cool features that work wonderfully, if that's what
> you mean.

> route.exe is supposed to let you set static routes so that you can be a
> *client* of multiple default routers. It does not route packets. It
> doesn't even work very well for what it's supposed to do -- the problems
> start with the typo in the help screen. (Run route /? and note "if" where
> it should read "it". No, it's not short for "interface." This will
> reportedly be fixed in Windows 95a, out in a couple weeks.)

> >As usual, I'm trying to do the impossible. I have however learned more from my
> >attempts than any other way. I am convinced that there is some way to get 95 to
> >route IP without going to third party products. If I am wrong I will admit to it
> >quickly here. I will also listen to anyone with ideas or suggestions.

> You're wrong.

> Win95 would be a terrible platform for routing software anyway. Lots of
> overhead, poor performance.

> Linux is free. Get it.

> -rich

>  ftp://ftp.stanford.edu/pub/mailing-lists/win95netbugs/
>  gopher://quixote.stanford.edu/1m/win95netbugs
>  http://www-leland.stanford.edu/~llurch/win95netbugs/faq.html

LINUX is free huh?  And I suppose it installs with A:\INSTALL
and actually works?  Not on this PC...

$.019999999685746464

Mith

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by Raymond C. S » Tue, 06 Feb 1996 04:00:00


I have some very basic questions regarding this thread:

Does setting up a Win95 TCP/IP gateway mean that if I have a lan,
there will only be one computer hooked up to the internet?

What if I have a class C IP address?  can I give all my computers on
the network a IP and have all the information somehow get sent through
1 win95 computer hooked up with a modem?

-ray




>> Can Win95 act as a gateway for IP?  If so, how is this done?  We
>> tried setting one machine's gateway setting to a machine outside
>> our immediate local net, and have all other machines point at that one
>> as the gateway; doesn't seem to work.  The "gateway wannabe" can see
>> the outside, and the other machines can see the wannabe, but not the
>> outside.

>See my previous post on this topic. You COULD try WinGate, which is an add-on
>to Win'95 which is claimed to allow IP routing. I THINK that a downloadable test
>version allows one machine to route for a SINGLE other. If you want more than that,
>you'll have to buy the full WinGate product, or use NT as your router.


*****************************************************
looking for a Job in VA,MD,DC?
Try http://www.sunstudios.com/ntsagwa/

Raymond C. Sun
SuN sTuDIoS     http://www.sunstudios.com/
(703) 532-1717

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by Thomas Le » Tue, 06 Feb 1996 04:00:00




Quote:>I have some very basic questions regarding this thread:

>Does setting up a Win95 TCP/IP gateway mean that if I have a lan,
>there will only be one computer hooked up to the internet?

No, because Win95 will not act as an IP router.

Quote:>What if I have a class C IP address?  

If you have a Class C address, then why are you not using NT or Unix for
this??

Quote:>can I give all my computers on
>the network a IP and have all the information somehow get sent through
>1 win95 computer hooked up with a modem?

Nope.  Win95 does not do IP routing.  

THomas

--

Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer and Certified Trainer
PS Partnership - A Microsoft Solution Provider
Ph: +44 1628 850 077   Fax: +44 1628 850 143

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by j.. » Wed, 07 Feb 1996 04:00:00




Quote:>I have some very basic questions regarding this thread:

>Does setting up a Win95 TCP/IP gateway mean that if I have a lan,
>there will only be one computer hooked up to the internet?

Regarding this thread, there is an alternative 32 bit TCP-IP stack
that does support dial-in gateway functions, IP and IPX packets
using the SLIP and PPP protocols.

It is shareware.

It does route between multiple network cards, and or multiple SLIP/PPP
connections.

It was written for Win3.1 and has been around for more than 2 years.

Latest editions covered WFW and Win95.

Only problem is it wasn't written to support the Microsoft Netbios functions.
I'm not sure, but I think this is in the process of being worked out.

Only works with packet drivers, but shims for NDIS and ODI drivers already
exist.

Enough said?  

Oh it's called CORE Winsock  Ver 2.1, and I just figured out how to configure
it for gateway support.

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by Jim Troc » Wed, 07 Feb 1996 04:00:00




>> Win95 would be a terrible platform for routing software anyway. Lots of
>> overhead, poor performance.

>> Linux is free. Get it.

>> -rich

>LINUX is free huh?  And I suppose it installs with A:\INSTALL
>and actually works?  Not on this PC...

If you won't use software that doesn't install using A:\INSTALL then you
shouldn't be routing IP anyway :)

Actually, if you need to route IP, then Slackware will install by
hitting ENTER a bunch of times. And it will work, too. Don't install X
if you just want to just route IP--you'll have less complaining to do.

And it's secure, too. Just disable everything from /etc/inetd.conf.
That's how Windows NT comes, anyway :)

Besides, you don't have to buy client licenses :)

Jim Trocki

 
 
 

How to setup a Win95 TCP/IP gateway to forward IP

Post by Ronnie Litchfie » Wed, 07 Feb 1996 04:00:00



>Can Win95 act as a gateway for IP?  If so, how is this done?  We
>tried setting one machine's gateway setting to a machine outside
>our immediate local net, and have all other machines point at that one
>as the gateway; doesn't seem to work.  The "gateway wannabe" can see
>the outside, and the other machines can see the wannabe, but not the
>outside.
>"If you want to do buzzword oriented programming, you    \\\//
> must use a strongly hyped language.."  -unknown         (O O)
>-----------------------------------------------------oOo--(_)--oOo--------

>Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering
>University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont. Canada

I'm using WinGate at home.  It's not a gateway, but I believe it will
do what you are asking.  It's actually a proxy server, which can be
used as a go between on the network.  You can use a dial-up or ISDN
connection on one machine on your LAN, then all other machines on the
LAN will have access to the internet.  The installation and setup
learning curve was realitively short for me.  I still haven't got the
mail host proxied yet, but I do have Internet Explorer, Netscape, IRC,
Telnet, FTP, and Free Agent News configured and running a remote
machine, linked to the internet through WinGate.  A single user
license is free, so it shouldn't hurt to give it a try.  If you need
to give access to more than one remote machine on your LAN, upgrade
packages are priced very reasonably.
 
 
 

1. Win95, ISDN TCP/IP and HP JetDirect TCP/IP Issue

I run Windows 95 on each of two computers which are connected via ethernet.  I
also have an HPLJ4M which has a JetDirect card added in order to provide
network print services.  The computers communicate with each other and the
networked printer using TCP/IP.  

I also have an ISDN connection to the Internet.  I use the USR Sportster 128K
internal ISDN card.

Prior to adding network printer services I had the system configured so that
if a program needed to connect to the Internet, Windows 95 would automatically
initiate the ISDN dial up.  So far so good.

After adding network printer services I found that attempting to print would
also initiate the automatic ISDN dial up.  That's not good.

I'd like to reenable automatic dialing but not have it triggered by printing.

What should I do?

Thanks.

-- Rich Robbins

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