Multi network cards to same network. Telling XP which to use!

Multi network cards to same network. Telling XP which to use!

Post by Adam » Mon, 18 Aug 2003 08:04:03



I need a little help with a networking query under Windows XP Pro.

I have a laptop with built-in wi-fi.  Generally, when I'm at home, I use the
wireless network to access my home network.  However, as it's only 802.11b,
it's quite slow (11Mb), and although it's fine for browsing the web and
downloading emails, it's a little too slow if I want to start coping files
around.

Therefore, I sometimes plug the laptop directly into my 100Mb network via
either it's built-in network card, or via the docking station (which means
that my laptop has three network devices, two of which may be in use at the
same time).

My problems is how can I tell XP to use the wired connection over the
wireless one (if it exists)?  Currently, the only way I've found to do this
is to temporarily manually disable the wireless network card, otherwise
although the wired network connection is in and working, XP doesn't use it
(if I run task manager, and look at the "networking" tab, I see two graphs,
one of which is the wireless network, and one which is the wired network.
The wired one is never used until I disable the wi-fi adapter).

I thought it had something to do with the "Interface Metric" option under
the advanced TCP/IP settings, although this doesn't appear to have any
effect - I've tried unchecking "automatic metric" and setting the wi-fi
TCP/IP settings both higher, and lower than the wired adapters, but this
doesn't appear to have any affect... Mind you, this is a little above my
head really!

Anyone help?!

TIA,
A.

 
 
 

Multi network cards to same network. Telling XP which to use!

Post by Steve Winograd [MVP » Mon, 18 Aug 2003 10:07:12




>I need a little help with a networking query under Windows XP Pro.

>I have a laptop with built-in wi-fi.  Generally, when I'm at home, I use the
>wireless network to access my home network.  However, as it's only 802.11b,
>it's quite slow (11Mb), and although it's fine for browsing the web and
>downloading emails, it's a little too slow if I want to start coping files
>around.

>Therefore, I sometimes plug the laptop directly into my 100Mb network via
>either it's built-in network card, or via the docking station (which means
>that my laptop has three network devices, two of which may be in use at the
>same time).

>My problems is how can I tell XP to use the wired connection over the
>wireless one (if it exists)?  Currently, the only way I've found to do this
>is to temporarily manually disable the wireless network card, otherwise
>although the wired network connection is in and working, XP doesn't use it
>(if I run task manager, and look at the "networking" tab, I see two graphs,
>one of which is the wireless network, and one which is the wired network.
>The wired one is never used until I disable the wi-fi adapter).

>I thought it had something to do with the "Interface Metric" option under
>the advanced TCP/IP settings, although this doesn't appear to have any
>effect - I've tried unchecking "automatic metric" and setting the wi-fi
>TCP/IP settings both higher, and lower than the wired adapters, but this
>doesn't appear to have any affect... Mind you, this is a little above my
>head really!

>Anyone help?!

>TIA,
>A.

Your description of how XP uses the "Interface Metric" looks exactly
right to me, Adam.  In fact, XP should automatically give preference
to a 100 mb wired connection over an 11 mb wireless connection, by
assigning a lower metric to the wired one, as shown here:

An Explanation of the Automatic Metric Feature for Internet Protocol
Routes
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;299540

Manually setting the wired metric lower than the wireless metric
should do what you want, too.

So why isn't it working?  The best way to figure that out would be to
see a copy of the route table made when both network connections are
active.  Please write it to a file using a command like:

   route print >route.txt

and then copy/paste the output into a news group reply.

--
Best Wishes,
Steve Winograd, MS-MVP (Windows Networking)

Please post any reply as a follow-up message in the news group
for everyone to see.  I'm sorry, but I don't answer questions
addressed directly to me in E-mail or news groups.

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com

 
 
 

Multi network cards to same network. Telling XP which to use!

Post by Adam » Mon, 18 Aug 2003 12:08:52


Quote:> Your description of how XP uses the "Interface Metric" looks exactly
> right to me, Adam.  In fact, XP should automatically give preference
> to a 100 mb wired connection over an 11 mb wireless connection, by
> assigning a lower metric to the wired one, as shown here:

> An Explanation of the Automatic Metric Feature for Internet Protocol
> Routes
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;299540

> Manually setting the wired metric lower than the wireless metric
> should do what you want, too.

> So why isn't it working?  The best way to figure that out would be to
> see a copy of the route table made when both network connections are
> active.  Please write it to a file using a command like:

>    route print >route.txt

> and then copy/paste the output into a news group reply.

Hi Steve,

Thanks for your help.  Here is a description, and the route table, for what
I've just tried...

I've sent the Interface Metric of the internal wi-fi adapter to "2", and the
Interface Metric of the internal wired adapter to "1".

Booted up the laptop without the cable attached (as I usually do).  Result
of "ipconfig" and "route print" are as follows:

IPConfig:

Ethernet adapter Wireless Network Connection:

        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.103
        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

Route:

===========================================================================
Interface List
0x1 ........................... MS TCP Loopback interface
0x2 ...00 06 5b bc f1 d4 ...... 3Com 3C920 Integrated Fast Ethernet
Controller (3C905C-TX Compatible) - Packet Scheduler Miniport
0x3 ...00 02 2d 5b fc ca ...... Dell TrueMobile 1150 Series Wireless LAN
Mini PCI Card - Packet Scheduler Miniport
===========================================================================
===========================================================================
Active Routes:
Network Destination        Netmask          Gateway       Interface  Metric
          0.0.0.0          0.0.0.0      192.168.0.1   192.168.0.103   2
        127.0.0.0        255.0.0.0        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1   1
      192.168.0.0    255.255.255.0    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   2
    192.168.0.103  255.255.255.255        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1   2
    192.168.0.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   2
        224.0.0.0        240.0.0.0    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   2
  255.255.255.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   1
  255.255.255.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.103               2   1
Default Gateway:       192.168.0.1
===========================================================================
Persistent Routes:
  None

Then, I plugged in the network cable, and waited until the network icon in
the taskbar appeared (I like to display my network icons down there!),
ipconfig and route now return the following:

ipconfig:

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.104
        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

Ethernet adapter Wireless Network Connection:

        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.103
        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

Route:

===========================================================================
Interface List
0x1 ........................... MS TCP Loopback interface
0x2 ...00 06 5b bc f1 d4 ...... 3Com 3C920 Integrated Fast Ethernet
Controller (3C905C-TX Compatible) - Packet Scheduler Miniport
0x3 ...00 02 2d 5b fc ca ...... Dell TrueMobile 1150 Series Wireless LAN
Mini PCI Card - Packet Scheduler Miniport
===========================================================================
===========================================================================
Active Routes:
Network Destination        Netmask          Gateway       Interface  Metric
          0.0.0.0          0.0.0.0      192.168.0.1   192.168.0.103   2
          0.0.0.0          0.0.0.0      192.168.0.1   192.168.0.104   1
        127.0.0.0        255.0.0.0        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1   1
      192.168.0.0    255.255.255.0    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   2
      192.168.0.0    255.255.255.0    192.168.0.104   192.168.0.104   1
    192.168.0.103  255.255.255.255        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1   2
    192.168.0.104  255.255.255.255        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1   1
    192.168.0.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   2
    192.168.0.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.104   192.168.0.104   1
        224.0.0.0        240.0.0.0    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   2
        224.0.0.0        240.0.0.0    192.168.0.104   192.168.0.104   1
  255.255.255.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   1
  255.255.255.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.104   192.168.0.104   1
Default Gateway:       192.168.0.1
===========================================================================
Persistent Routes:
  None

I open up the Task Manager, and view the Networking tab, then copy a 5Mb
file from my server to the laptop.  The speed of the copy, and the graph
displayed in Task Manager clearly show that the wireless network is still
being used.  There is a little activity on the wired LAN, but nowhere near
as much as on the wireless LAN (something like 0.1% of the 100Mb interface,
and 40% on the 802.11b interface while the file is being copied).

I also tried waiting for 10 minutes or so, and copying the file again, but
still had the same results.

I don't know much about this, but from looking at the second route table, it
looks to me that the metric is correct, and that it should therefore be
using the .104 IP (eg, the wired and lowest metric, connection) over the
.103 (the wi-fi).  However is *certainly* isn't!  The only way I can get the
wired connection working is by disabling the wi-fi adapter. When I do that,
the .104 IP works, so clearly isn't not a cabling problem or anything.

If it's any importance, I'm using a TrueMobile 1150 mini-PCI card in the
laptop.  The card comes with client management software which is always
running in the background (shows a little "signal strength" icon in the task
bar), I've had a look at the client manager software, but can't see any
mention of interface metric.  In fact, it appears to pass control over to XP
networking if you try and change anything (eg, it doesn't appear that it
keeps it's own network settings anywhere).

Now here's an interesting thing... I've been playing with copying files
around while I've been typing this.  It appears that if I copy a file from
the server to the laptop, it uses wi-fi, but if I copy the same file back
again (laptop --> server) it correctly uses wired!! - This appears to be
consistent using different files from and to different shares on the
server... I use a wireless access point, so my server only has one (wired)
network card in it (well, two, but one is for the cable modem), so it can't
be that the interface metric is set incorrectly on the server...

Any thoughts?!

Thanks,.
A.

 
 
 

Multi network cards to same network. Telling XP which to use!

Post by Steve Winograd [MVP » Mon, 18 Aug 2003 14:23:04


In article <dnC%a.1561$xy....@news-binary.blueyonder.co.uk>, "Adam"

<add...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> Your description of how XP uses the "Interface Metric" looks exactly
>> right to me, Adam.  In fact, XP should automatically give preference
>> to a 100 mb wired connection over an 11 mb wireless connection, by
>> assigning a lower metric to the wired one, as shown here:

>> An Explanation of the Automatic Metric Feature for Internet Protocol
>> Routes
>> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;299540

>> Manually setting the wired metric lower than the wireless metric
>> should do what you want, too.

>> So why isn't it working?  The best way to figure that out would be to
>> see a copy of the route table made when both network connections are
>> active.  Please write it to a file using a command like:

>>    route print >route.txt

>> and then copy/paste the output into a news group reply.

>Hi Steve,

>Thanks for your help.  Here is a description, and the route table, for what
>I've just tried...

>I've sent the Interface Metric of the internal wi-fi adapter to "2", and the
>Interface Metric of the internal wired adapter to "1".

>Booted up the laptop without the cable attached (as I usually do).  Result
>of "ipconfig" and "route print" are as follows:

>IPConfig:

>Ethernet adapter Wireless Network Connection:

>        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
>        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.103
>        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
>        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

>Route:

>===========================================================================
>Interface List
>0x1 ........................... MS TCP Loopback interface
>0x2 ...00 06 5b bc f1 d4 ...... 3Com 3C920 Integrated Fast Ethernet
>Controller (3C905C-TX Compatible) - Packet Scheduler Miniport
>0x3 ...00 02 2d 5b fc ca ...... Dell TrueMobile 1150 Series Wireless LAN
>Mini PCI Card - Packet Scheduler Miniport
>===========================================================================
>===========================================================================
>Active Routes:
>Network Destination        Netmask          Gateway       Interface  Metric
>          0.0.0.0          0.0.0.0      192.168.0.1   192.168.0.103   2
>        127.0.0.0        255.0.0.0        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1   1
>      192.168.0.0    255.255.255.0    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   2
>    192.168.0.103  255.255.255.255        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1   2
>    192.168.0.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   2
>        224.0.0.0        240.0.0.0    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   2
>  255.255.255.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   1
>  255.255.255.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.103               2   1
>Default Gateway:       192.168.0.1
>===========================================================================
>Persistent Routes:
>  None

>Then, I plugged in the network cable, and waited until the network icon in
>the taskbar appeared (I like to display my network icons down there!),
>ipconfig and route now return the following:

>ipconfig:

>Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

>        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
>        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.104
>        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
>        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

>Ethernet adapter Wireless Network Connection:

>        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
>        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.103
>        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
>        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

>Route:

>===========================================================================
>Interface List
>0x1 ........................... MS TCP Loopback interface
>0x2 ...00 06 5b bc f1 d4 ...... 3Com 3C920 Integrated Fast Ethernet
>Controller (3C905C-TX Compatible) - Packet Scheduler Miniport
>0x3 ...00 02 2d 5b fc ca ...... Dell TrueMobile 1150 Series Wireless LAN
>Mini PCI Card - Packet Scheduler Miniport
>===========================================================================
>===========================================================================
>Active Routes:
>Network Destination        Netmask          Gateway       Interface  Metric
>          0.0.0.0          0.0.0.0      192.168.0.1   192.168.0.103   2
>          0.0.0.0          0.0.0.0      192.168.0.1   192.168.0.104   1
>        127.0.0.0        255.0.0.0        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1   1
>      192.168.0.0    255.255.255.0    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   2
>      192.168.0.0    255.255.255.0    192.168.0.104   192.168.0.104   1
>    192.168.0.103  255.255.255.255        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1   2
>    192.168.0.104  255.255.255.255        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1   1
>    192.168.0.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   2
>    192.168.0.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.104   192.168.0.104   1
>        224.0.0.0        240.0.0.0    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   2
>        224.0.0.0        240.0.0.0    192.168.0.104   192.168.0.104   1
>  255.255.255.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.103   192.168.0.103   1
>  255.255.255.255  255.255.255.255    192.168.0.104   192.168.0.104   1
>Default Gateway:       192.168.0.1
>===========================================================================
>Persistent Routes:
>  None

>I open up the Task Manager, and view the Networking tab, then copy a 5Mb
>file from my server to the laptop.  The speed of the copy, and the graph
>displayed in Task Manager clearly show that the wireless network is still
>being used.  There is a little activity on the wired LAN, but nowhere near
>as much as on the wireless LAN (something like 0.1% of the 100Mb interface,
>and 40% on the 802.11b interface while the file is being copied).

>I also tried waiting for 10 minutes or so, and copying the file again, but
>still had the same results.

>I don't know much about this, but from looking at the second route table, it
>looks to me that the metric is correct, and that it should therefore be
>using the .104 IP (eg, the wired and lowest metric, connection) over the
>.103 (the wi-fi).  However is *certainly* isn't!  The only way I can get the
>wired connection working is by disabling the wi-fi adapter. When I do that,
>the .104 IP works, so clearly isn't not a cabling problem or anything.

>If it's any importance, I'm using a TrueMobile 1150 mini-PCI card in the
>laptop.  The card comes with client management software which is always
>running in the background (shows a little "signal strength" icon in the task
>bar), I've had a look at the client manager software, but can't see any
>mention of interface metric.  In fact, it appears to pass control over to XP
>networking if you try and change anything (eg, it doesn't appear that it
>keeps it's own network settings anywhere).

>Now here's an interesting thing... I've been playing with copying files
>around while I've been typing this.  It appears that if I copy a file from
>the server to the laptop, it uses wi-fi, but if I copy the same file back
>again (laptop --> server) it correctly uses wired!! - This appears to be
>consistent using different files from and to different shares on the
>server... I use a wireless access point, so my server only has one (wired)
>network card in it (well, two, but one is for the cable modem), so it can't
>be that the interface metric is set incorrectly on the server...

>Any thoughts?!

>Thanks,.
>A.

Everything in the route tables looks normal to me, Adam.  

Do these statements accurately summarize the situation?

1. If you start a file copy from the keyboard/mouse of the laptop, it
uses the laptop's wired network connection, and:

2. If you start a file copy from the keyboard/mouse of the server, it
uses the laptop's wireless network connection.

I'd be surprised if #1 isn't true, since that's what the laptop's
route tables dictate.

I have an explanation for why #2 would be true.  The laptop computer
has two IP addresses.  Both of them are in the same subnet and are
associated with the same computer name.  Even after you enable the
wireless network connection, the server computer's NetBIOS name table
could still associate the laptop's name with the wireless network
connection's IP address.  So a copy initiated from the server could
use the wireless connection.

Try this on the server computer:

1. Access the laptop by its wired IP address, e.g. type this in the
Start | Run box to open a window showing the laptop's shared disks and
folders:

   \\192.168.0.104

2. Do the file copy by dragging a file or folder into or out of that
window.

3. See which connection it uses.
--
Best Wishes,
Steve Winograd, MS-MVP (Windows Networking)

Please post any reply as a follow-up message in the news group
for everyone to see.  I'm sorry, but I don't answer questions
addressed directly to me in E-mail or news groups.

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com

 
 
 

Multi network cards to same network. Telling XP which to use!

Post by Richard Malcolm-Smit » Mon, 18 Aug 2003 20:00:17



> My problems is how can I tell XP to use the wired connection over the
> wireless one (if it exists)?  Currently, the only way I've found to do this
> is to temporarily manually disable the wireless network card, otherwise
> although the wired network connection is in and working, XP doesn't use it
> (if I run task manager, and look at the "networking" tab, I see two graphs,
> one of which is the wireless network, and one which is the wired network.
> The wired one is never used until I disable the wi-fi adapter).

Bridge them, it worked for me.