NTLDR: Fatal Error 4096 Reading boot.ini

NTLDR: Fatal Error 4096 Reading boot.ini

Post by *Vanguard » Sun, 21 Mar 2004 18:59:16




Quote:> I've rebooted my computer, did not install ANY new hardware nor
> software that I'm aware off. And then I get this:

> NTLDR: Fatal Error 4096
> Reading boot.ini

<snip>

Is there a diskette in the floppy drive?

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NTLDR: Fatal Error 4096 Reading boot.ini

Post by *Vanguard » Mon, 22 Mar 2004 15:31:33



Quote:> I wish that there was :) Nope, no floppy drive is installed in this
> system.

Tried a reboot using the Windows installation CD and using its Repair
function?  I believe this will also correct the entries in the boot.ini
file.

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NTLDR: Fatal Error 4096 Reading boot.ini

Post by MVP Win » Mon, 22 Mar 2004 22:11:39


On Sat, 20 Mar 2004 10:06:08 -0800, "Bojan"


>I wish that there was :) Nope, no floppy drive is installed in this system.

Then you need to get in and see what happened to the Boot.ini

MUCH easier if you'd Just Said No to NTFS; DOS mode boot diskette,
Scandisk to non-destructively (interactive, can back out) handle
errors, use Odi's LFN Tools to evacuate the HD if it is failing,
formally scan everything for active malware, etc.  And, of course,
edit Boot.ini and either fix it, or paste it here so we can have a go.
Or you can use the Recovery Console to FIXBOOT   :-)

On NTFS, you have basically the Recovery Console and that's it.  You
may not even have that, on an OEM system.  Unless you quest for
various free or costly tools (NTFS reader for DOS mode, NTFS TSR
drivers for DOS mode or Linux, bootable CDRs a la Bart's PE builder
(XP) or Knoppix et al (Linux), all you can do is trust ChkDsk /F to
blindly "fix" the file system, do a "repair" install, then try and
pull down the patches you lost while a world full of Lovesan and other
RPC exploiters shoot you to pieces (hint: Use the firewall, Luke)

Recovery Console should let you eyeball and hopefully edit Boot.ini,
though once you know the file system is OK, it's easier to let RC
automagically fix Boot.ini by using the FIXBOOT command.

Quote:>-------------------- ----- ---- --- -- - -  -   -

  Running Windows-based av to kill active malware is like striking
  a match to see if what you are standing in is water or petrol.
Quote:>-------------------- ----- ---- --- -- - -  -   -

 
 
 

NTLDR: Fatal Error 4096 Reading boot.ini

Post by *Vanguard » Tue, 23 Mar 2004 11:50:42


"cquirke (MVP Win9x)" said in

Quote:> MUCH easier if you'd Just Said No to NTFS;

Then say goodbye to security.  No permissions.  No EFS.

<snip>

Quote:> Or you can use the Recovery Console to FIXBOOT   :-)

Ah, that's the one I was trying to remember.  However, I have an
NTFSini.exe utility that, I believe, is part of PartitionMagic that lets
me yank the boot.ini file from an NTFS partition, edit it, and then
write it back.  So I boot using a DOS bootable floppy (see
www.bootdisk.com for bootable floppy images) on which is the NTFSini.exe
utility.  Lets me message the boot.ini file should a new drive get
installed that changes their physical ordering or insert a partition
ahead of another (and forget to alter the boot.ini ahead of time to
prepare for the reboot when the partitions and/or drives have changed
their physical ordering).

Quote:> On NTFS, you have basically the Recovery Console and that's it.  You
> may not even have that, on an OEM system.

The difference between OEM and retail versions is the license and the
OEM forces a full install instead of an upgrade.  Otherwise, the rest is
the same.  You DO have recovery console with the OEM version.

Quote:> Unless you quest for
> various free or costly tools (NTFS reader for DOS mode, NTFS TSR
> drivers for DOS mode or Linux, bootable CDRs a la Bart's PE builder
> (XP) or Knoppix et al (Linux), all you can do is trust ChkDsk /F to
> blindly "fix" the file system, do a "repair" install, then try and

<snip>

As opposed to blindly letting other utilities do it for you on a
FAT12/16/32 partition.  Not many users are adept at using disk editors
so they can edit or move sectors.

<snip>

Quote:> -------------------- ----- ---- --- -- - -  -   -
>   Running Windows-based av to kill active malware is like striking
>   a match to see if what you are standing in is water or petrol.
>> -------------------- ----- ---- --- -- - -  -   -

You need to get a more modern anti-virus program.  Obviously you only
use one that can only perform disaster recovery through a manually
initiated or scheduled scan rather than dynamically monitor for inbound
viruses to eliminate them from ever getting into your box in the first
place.
 
 
 

NTLDR: Fatal Error 4096 Reading boot.ini

Post by MVP Win » Wed, 24 Mar 2004 11:00:34


On Sun, 21 Mar 2004 20:50:42 -0600, "*Vanguard*"

Quote:>"cquirke (MVP Win9x)" said in
>> MUCH easier if you'd Just Said No to NTFS;
>Then say goodbye to security.  No permissions.  No EFS.

Less unrecoverable data loss.  No entrenched malware.

It's a deal   :-)

Quote:>The difference between OEM and retail versions is the license and the
>OEM forces a full install instead of an upgrade.  Otherwise, the rest is
>the same.  You DO have recovery console with the OEM version.

Varies; what you describe is the DSP CDs I build with.  Some, but not
all, OEM CDs are identical to the DSP (DSP = Delivery Service Partner,
i.e. small-scale OEM that uses off-the-peg DSP CDs), though they may
say OEM instead of DSP and have the OEM's name on them (e.g. "to be
sold only with a new BIGBUCKET system" rather than "to be sold only
with a new system").

But large OEMs can, and do, negotiate the right to roll their own CDs.
As long as MS gets the money, they don't really care what is (not) on
the CD unless the OEM starts putting rival software in there.

Typically these sort of OEM CDs aren't capable of controlled
installation at all.  They may only offer an "instant restore" that
splats the whole system back to one big C:, all your apps and data
gone, etc.  There may be OEM's "value add" on there, e.g. not their
device drivers but also bundleware, tutorials etc.  To make space,
some Windows components may get thrown overboard, e.g. Backup,
Recovery Console and so on.

But that's not all; you can get even less - say, no installation CD at
all.  You lose your HD's bootability; ship the PC back to the factory
or authorised monkey cage, and they will wipe your HD and redo their
factory set up.  When that's the only "support" you offer, it's
amazing how quiet the phone lines are   :-)

OEM is cheaper than DSP.  These sharky cut-down and stunted variants
are likely to cost even less, and not only because of the bulk they
are ordered in.  An "instant restore" CD that works only with one
OEM's proprietary system is less likely to get warez'd out.

Quote:>> Unless you quest for various free or costly tools (NTFS reader
>> for DOS mode, NTFS TSR drivers for DOS mode or Linux,
>> bootable CDRs a la Bart's PE builder (XP) or Knoppix et al
>> (Linux), all you can do is trust ChkDsk /F to blindly "fix" the
>> file system, do a "repair" install,...
>As opposed to blindly letting other utilities do it for you on a
>FAT12/16/32 partition.  

Nope; you have a choice there.  You can, and IMO should, go
interactive - so that you at least know what you are saying yes to!

There's everything from "trust me, I'll fix this" to "show me what you
want to do first, and *ask* if you may do that" to "skip the
editorial, just show me the bytes and let me get on with it"

In NTFS, there's a choice of ChkDsk and that's it.

Quote:>Not many users are adept at using disk editors so they can
>edit or move sectors.

No, but their techs can help.  MS's WinPE builder is a useful tool for
such techs, but it's restricted only to those large OEMs who aren't
going to bother with data recovery anyway.

Quote:>> -------------------- ----- ---- --- -- - -  -   -
>>   Running Windows-based av to kill active malware is like striking
>>   a match to see if what you are standing in is water or petrol.
>>> -------------------- ----- ---- --- -- - -  -   -
>You need to get a more modern anti-virus program.  Obviously you only
>use one that can only perform disaster recovery through a manually
>initiated or scheduled scan rather than dynamically monitor for inbound
>viruses to eliminate them from ever getting into your box in the first
>place.

No, I don't.  My front line av is indeed Windows based (it's AVG), but
I never assume it can't be broached.  When that happens, that's when I
go formal.  Think of Windows-based av as like burglar bars; they are a
convienient way of screening out malware.  

When they fail, i.e. when you come home to a broken front door or
window, and see flickering torches inside - that's when you need a
more hard-core, formal solution.

The word ACTIVE is in there for a reason.  Malware that hasn't run yet
is not active, and is fair game for frontier (Windows-based) av.  In a
perfect world, that would be the only av you need, because it would
never be beaten.  But in real life, etc.

Quote:>-- Risk Management is the clue that asks:

      "Why do I keep open buckets of petrol next to all the
      ashtrays in the lounge, when I don't even have a car?"
Quote:>----------------------- ------ ---- --- -- - -  -    -

 
 
 

NTLDR: Fatal Error 4096 Reading boot.ini

Post by *Vanguard » Wed, 24 Mar 2004 16:45:35


"cquirke (MVP Win9x)" said in

Quote:>> Then say goodbye to security.  No permissions.  No EFS.
> Less unrecoverable data loss.  No entrenched malware.

> It's a deal   :-)

Security and ease-of-use have always been the antithesis of each other.
More of one means less of the other.

Quote:> Varies; what you describe is the DSP CDs I build with.  Some, but not
> all, OEM CDs are identical to the DSP (DSP = Delivery Service Partner,
> i.e. small-scale OEM that uses off-the-peg DSP CDs), though they may
> say OEM instead of DSP and have the OEM's name on them (e.g. "to be
> sold only with a new BIGBUCKET system" rather than "to be sold only
> with a new system").

> But large OEMs can, and do, negotiate the right to roll their own CDs.
> As long as MS gets the money, they don't really care what is (not) on
> the CD unless the OEM starts putting rival software in there.

> Typically these sort of OEM CDs aren't capable of controlled
> installation at all.  They may only offer an "instant restore" that
> splats the whole system back to one big C:, all your apps and data
> gone, etc.

Yeah, restores that are just disk images that wipe out your entire
partition really suck.  I think it was my dad's Compaq many years ago
that he needed help on when I first encounter the Terminator "install"
CD.  Boy, was I glad that I had drilled it into him often enough to get
backup drives and schedule timely backups.

Quote:> But that's not all; you can get even less - say, no installation CD at
> all.  You lose your HD's bootability; ship the PC back to the factory
> or authorised monkey cage, and they will wipe your HD and redo their
> factory set up.

Rather than provide a CD at such great cost ... NOT! ... the jobber puts
the restore image or install program in a hidden partition on the hard
drive.  You restore using that.  If the drive fails, you're *ed.  If
you replace the drive (and don't have the old one anymore or wiped it),
you're *ed.  By the time the user has replaced the hard drive, often
it's too late to recover the hidden restore partition.  Dell used to do
this (don't know if they still do).  It was the stupidest way of
including a restore/install of the OS just to save the pennies of a CD
bought in bulk.  Some have you run a utility that copies or extracts the
files or image onto CDs making you waste your time but presumes you read
the fine print in the manual about how to do it, if mentioned at all.

Quote:> An "instant restore" CD that works only with one
> OEM's proprietary system is less likely to get warez'd out.

BIOS-locked version.  Can only be installed on that computer (well, on
that model having the correct signature in the BIOS).  But, at least,
you got a CD to do a restore.  Hopefully it wasn't just a disk image
that wipes your disk.
 
 
 

1. Error message: NTLDR: Fatal Error 1 reading BOOT.ini

Hi,

Have you inserted any floppy disk inside the floppy drive during the start up/reboot?
If yes, eject the floppy disk and start the PC again.

Peter


     After renaming my computer name through the "My Computer" and being asked to re-boot I keep getting this message upon rebooting: "Error message: NTLDR: Fatal Error 1 reading BOOT.ini". I've tried booting from a floppy or CD ROM by selecting them in the BIOS as 1st & 2nd boot devices, but it never boots from them and it keeps giving me the same message. Any suggestions on what to try?

     This computer is a pentium II that was previously running Windows 98 and I upgraded to XP successfully and it had been working fine until I tried to change the computer name.

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