Time indication of my outward mail is faulty

Time indication of my outward mail is faulty

Post by wille » Tue, 13 Dec 2005 18:52:02



When I send a mail to someone at e.g. 1600h. The recipient reads as
"sent"-time: 1.35AM the next day. I am puzzled! How can this happen, and how
can I correct this?
Kind regards,
Willem
 
 
 

Time indication of my outward mail is faulty

Post by Ron Somme » Tue, 13 Dec 2005 19:53:24


Check your Time Zone settings in Control Panel.
--
Ron Sommer


Quote:> When I send a mail to someone at e.g. 1600h. The recipient reads as
> "sent"-time: 1.35AM the next day. I am puzzled! How can this happen, and
> how
> can I correct this?
> Kind regards,
> Willem


 
 
 

Time indication of my outward mail is faulty

Post by Michael Santove » Wed, 14 Dec 2005 05:06:10


What mail program is the recipient using?  And where are they seeing the
time?

Each mail messages has multiple time stamps.  You can see these in the
Message Source or message header.

Some mail programs show a Received Time, which is when the message was
received by their ISP's mail server.  The server supplies the time.
This is the first of possibly several "Received:" lines in the message
header.

Some mail programs show the Sent Time, which is from the sender's PC and
generally reflects when he wrote the message, not when he transmitted
it.  (For some mail clients, this may be the time the message was sent.
I believe Eudora does this.  For OE it is when the message entered the
Outbox.)  The time comes from his PC.  This is the "Date:" line in the
message header.

Some mail programs show both in different areas of the program.  (OE
shows the Received time in the message list but the Sent time when you
open a message in its own window or print it.)

The time stamps include a time zone code as either an offset from GMT
(e.g. -0800) or a character code (e.g. PST).  Many mail programs attempt
to adjust displayed times to your local time.  If it doesn't recognize a
time zone in a time stamp, it may be treated as GMT or it may be treated
as your local time zone.

For Win95 and newer, look in Control Panel, Date/Time.  This applies to
most 32-bit mail programs.  For 16-bit mail programs on any version of
Windows, the program may have a configuration setting for the time zone,
or may use an Environment variable set in AUTOEXEC.BAT.  For more
information, see: http://www.ufaq.org/navcom/settz.html

Due to incorrect clock settings and time zones (either sender's PC,
recipient's PC or mail server) and improperly formatted time stamps (a
number of servers ignore the Internet standards), the displayed times
may or may not be accurate.

--

Mike - http://pages.prodigy.net/michael_santovec/techhelp.htm


Quote:> When I send a mail to someone at e.g. 1600h. The recipient reads as
> "sent"-time: 1.35AM the next day. I am puzzled! How can this happen,
> and how
> can I correct this?
> Kind regards,
> Willem

 
 
 

Time indication of my outward mail is faulty

Post by Alan » Wed, 14 Dec 2005 05:05:50



Quote:> When I send a mail to someone at e.g. 1600h. The recipient reads as
> "sent"-time: 1.35AM the next day. I am puzzled! How can this happen, and
> how
> can I correct this?
> Kind regards,
> Willem

Both you and your recipients should check that the time zones are set
correctly. And that your time is properly set. And tick Tools, Options,
Send, Send messages immediately checkbox. And are they in a different time
zone to yourself?
 
 
 

1. Am I extremely unlucky or Intel manufactures faulty motherboards?

Recently I have purchased a computer assembled together to my
specifications by Netis Technology of Milpitas, CA. It was 200MHz
Pentium Pro with Intel motherboard model VS440FX. I ran Norton
Diagnostics on it (ndiags.exe from Norton Utilities, ver 8.0 for DOS
with loopback plugs). It has passed all the tests except for Comm1
port. The failures varied slightly on subsequent tests but most often
it failed:

1. Modem Control
2. Modem Status

Comm2 worked perfectly. I have returned the computer to the seller.
Netis tested 5 more motherboards and found that all of them failed on
comm1. They told me that they will try contact Intel and Norton
(Symantec now) and find out was it software or hardware at fault. I
have not heard from them since.

Today I purchased two 266MHz, Pentium II systems with Intel PD440FX
motherboards. Different vendor this time, Art Multimedia of Milpitas.
I have ran the same tests and received the same failures. Com1 fails
comm2 passes. I ran my tests from a bootable floppy disk with MS-DOS
6.22. I have also tried to use newer ndiags.exe from NU for Win95 with
MS-DOS 7.1 bootable floppy (Win95-OSR2). Same failures again.

I contacted Intel's Customer Support and was told that there is no
known problem with PD440FX board. I decided to be the first one to
report the problem but was told that I can only report it via
"feedback" option on Intel's web page.

In my opinion Intel's motherboards are faulty but I will be glad to
hear that I am wrong and how to fix the problems with my computers. I
cannot return them and wait because new employees will start on
Monday.

Any recommendations on non-Intel motherboards for my future purchases?

Wes
--
InnoMedia Inc. Systems Administrator

PS. 200 MHz Pentium with MMX on TC430HX board passes with not failures
at all.

2. Help needed. WMP for Mac 6.3

3. windows media player time indication

4. Convert MSVC Proj to EVC or PB

5. Time Zone Indication? Win98

6. Evidence Eliminator problem

7. mail time and pc clock time are different ...

8. IE 6 woes..

9. Outlook Express 6.0 mails have AM/PM in Date Headers

10. There HAS to be a way...to download mail when I am not at home

11. I am not receiving mail into my mailbox

12. For the first time I am getting the dreaded red Xs on a web page

13. XP crashes 1 time out of 10 at start up: Am I alone?