Re loading favorites folders after reformatting drive

Re loading favorites folders after reformatting drive

Post by Crai » Mon, 17 Feb 2003 15:30:37



I copied my IE-6 files to a second disk D: before having
to reformat my c: drive. Now when all IE-6 files are
copied back to C: ,after reformatting, all favorites
folders are gone. Where did they go and what were the
named. How do I get them back?

Thanks, Craig

 
 
 

Re loading favorites folders after reformatting drive

Post by Donal » Mon, 17 Feb 2003 19:16:41


Quote:>-----Original Message-----
>I copied my IE-6 files to a second disk D: before having
>to reformat my c: drive. Now when all IE-6 files are
>copied back to C: ,after reformatting, all favorites
>folders are gone. Where did they go and what were the
>named. How do I get them back?

>Thanks, Craig
>.

The most probable reason is that you have multiple open
pages and have pushed the PC to the limits of its available
resources.  Most likely it is in a race situation where it
is trying to offload and reload code segments to thw swap
file, and has fallen too far behind to do anything more
than just churn as it gets more and more mired down.

There are several things you can do.  (1)  Add more memory.
 This is always a good thing to do, but is not the only
choice.  (2)  Got to Start/Settings/Control Panel/System,
and then find where you can adjust your Virtual Memory
settings.  Ideally, your VM setting should be between 2.5
and 3.5 times as much in size as the amount of RAM you have
in your system.  You should also set the Minimum and
Maximum levels to the same figure as a way to further
enhance performance.  What you are really controlling here
is the amount of disk space being given over for the Swap
file, which Windows will use to "park" some of its RAM
contents when it needs to load a new program or process.
But Hard Drives are thousands of times slower than RAM, so
you will usually start seeing a major slowdown in your
system if Windows begins relying heavily on the Swap file
to keep up with everything you have going on at once.  You
can help by closing down some of the stuff your aren't
using right now.
(3)  The third option is to install a Resource Manager
program such as Memory Zipper or Turbo Memory.  These
monitor what applications are still running in your PC, and
when one disappears (has been closed), the program orders
Windows to release all the resources that were previsouly
associated with that program.  Many programs simply fail to
tell Windows this themselves, often because they were
pre-emptied by clicking on the X in the upper right corner.
 These Resource Managers are essentially clean-up crews
that plug so-called "memory-leaks", but a really good one
does much more, such as allow you to adjust certain limits
of RAM, change task priorities, and monitor how well your
system is responding.

Personally, having tested several of these programs, I
favor Memory Zipper.  Others may be as good or better, but
this is one I can endorce.