numlock command?

numlock command?

Post by Mike Stephe » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



I have a client that is mainly an accounting business.  
They prefer to have the numlock keys activated by
default.  Is there a way in os2 that I can have this happen
(either with a config set statement or a small os2 utility
that can be executed in startup.cmd?)  Also is there a
small recommended program that I can put in the
autoexec.bat file for all the dos programs they run as
well?  I assume that this same dos program can be used
for the windows sessions as well.  Thanks in advance!

Mike Stephen


 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Frank Beythi » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00




Hi Mike,

Quote:> I have a client that is mainly an accounting business.  
> They prefer to have the numlock keys activated by
> default.  Is there a way in os2 that I can have this happen

I'm using Jshifter 1.62  in startup.cmd and autoexec.bat.
Filename is jshif162.zip. Got it from LEO.  
ftp.leo.org/pub/comp/os/os2/...  not sure about the rest.

Hope it helps.

CU/2
Frank
--


 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by sh.. » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



'llowed:

  I have a client that is mainly an accounting business.  
  They prefer to have the numlock keys activated by
  default.  Is there a way in os2 that I can have this happen
  (either with a config set statement or a small os2 utility
  that can be executed in startup.cmd?)  Also is there a
  small recommended program that I can put in the
  autoexec.bat file for all the dos programs they run as
  well?  I assume that this same dos program can be used
  for the windows sessions as well.  Thanks in advance!

Get WILLUTIL.ZIP, a small utility package that contains files for OS/2
and Win/DOS. It is rock steady and reliable; I have been using it for
years, since OS/2 v2.0. You can control the default settings of all
the shift keys: Numlock, Capslock, etc., as well as keyboard
repetition rate and more. Download it from Hobbes; is is now in
directory ./pub/os2/util/system.

For OS/2 you can put an icon in the startup folder; for Win/DOS you
put a line in AUTOEXEC.BAT; there is a demon file that detects
unwanted changes at transitions into and out of Win-OS2.

S.G.

!!!SORRY!!! The return address is a Black Hole, my only defense
against spam. Sorry for the inconvenience; I cannot list my real
address here.

Email sent to this address will never get to me, or be read by
anybody.

 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Jerry Laph » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00




Quote:> They prefer to have the numlock keys activated by
> default.  Is there a way in os2 that I can have this happen  (either
> with a config set statement or a small os2 utility  that can be executed
> in startup.cmd?)  Also is there a
> small recommended program that I can put in the
> autoexec.bat file for all the dos programs they run as
> well?

Look for jshif162.zip on Hobbes, etc.  It's freeware and works as well as
anything I've tried, though not 100% on my system.

    -Jerry
--
============================================================
Jerry Lapham, Monroe, OH

Written Friday, June 05, 1998 - 01:32 PM (EDT)
============================================================
MR/2 Ice tag:  "I'm in the infantry," Tom grunted.

 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Felix Miat » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00




>   I have a client that is mainly an accounting business.
>   They prefer to have the numlock keys activated by
>   default.  Is there a way in os2 that I can have this happen
>   (either with a config set statement or a small os2 utility
>   that can be executed in startup.cmd?)  Also is there a
>   small recommended program that I can put in the
>   autoexec.bat file for all the dos programs they run as
>   well?  I assume that this same dos program can be used
>   for the windows sessions as well.  Thanks in advance!
> Get WILLUTIL.ZIP, a small utility package that contains files for OS/2
> and Win/DOS. It is rock steady and reliable; I have been using it for
> years, since OS/2 v2.0. You can control the default settings of all
> the shift keys: Numlock, Capslock, etc., as well as keyboard
> repetition rate and more. Download it from Hobbes; is is now in
> directory ./pub/os2/util/system.
> For OS/2 you can put an icon in the startup folder; for Win/DOS you
> put a line in AUTOEXEC.BAT; there is a demon file that detects
> unwanted changes at transitions into and out of Win-OS2.

As an accountant myself, I can't for the life of me understand why OS/2
insists on turning off NUM when the PC BIOS has been told to turn it on.
And why would anyone with a normal keyboard want the num pad to be a
duplication of the cursor keys? Granted, some laptop users may be less
keen on choice of default state, but the OS certainly ought to be
flexible enough to have this state configurable without an external
utility.

I used to use WILLUTIL, even registering the product, but sometime after
the first release of Warp 4, IBM switched the OS from having separate
shift states for each session to having them system wide. After that
happened, I started having keyboard trouble that eliminating WILLUTIL
solved. Since then, I just have STARTUP.CMD remind me to do it manually
when I boot.
--
"It is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the
Bible."        George Washington

Team OS/2        ***        SCSI ONLY since 1990

Felix Miata        ***        http://www.gate.net/~mrmazda

 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Peter Dru » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00




:->
:->As an accountant myself, I can't for the life of me understand why OS/2
:->insists on turning off NUM when the PC BIOS has been told to turn it on.

Another opinion;
As a non-accountant myself, I can't for the life of me understand why
anyone would -want- the NumLock -on- all the time. The only time I use
the number keypad is for entering data in my checking account once a
month, it's easy enought to hit NumLock when I want it. All other
times I use the top row of number keys.

My BIOS is set to leave NumLock off, and always will be...


Using OS/2 Warp 4!
Wausau, WI. 44d 58m 00s N x 89d 36m 45s W
All opinions are mine alone, you go get your own!

 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Felix Miat » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00





> :->As an accountant myself, I can't for the life of me understand why OS/2
> :->insists on turning off NUM when the PC BIOS has been told to turn it on.
> Another opinion;
> As a non-accountant myself, I can't for the life of me understand why
> anyone would -want- the NumLock -on- all the time.

1- The inverted-T cursor section serves more reliably, segretating basic
movement from other functions
2- Once one learns to use a ten-key for entering numbers, any other
method for enterning a significant amount of them is ludicrous. If your
accountant or bookkeeper didn't have the numpad, you would be paying her
for more hours.

Quote:> The only time I use
> the number keypad is for entering data in my checking account once a
> month, it's easy enought to hit NumLock when I want it. All other
> times I use the top row of number keys.

Consistent use of the cursor-only section for movement and the numpad
only for num functions allows consistent and consequently more reliable
and predictable input. There is no need to check the num status to
assure desired entry or nagivational results. If I had my 'druthers, the
top row keys would only generate numbers when shifted, allowing all
those other top row keys to be more easily accessed. NUMLOCK would not
only lock the numpad to numbers, it would also reverse the default of
the top row keys.
--
"It is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the
Bible."        George Washington

Team OS/2        ***        SCSI ONLY since 1990

Felix Miata        ***        http://www.gate.net/~mrmazda

 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Peter Dru » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



writes:
:->
:->


:->
:->> :->As an accountant myself, I can't for the life of me understand why OS/2
:->> :->insists on turning off NUM when the PC BIOS has been told to turn it on.
:->
:->> Another opinion;
:->> As a non-accountant myself, I can't for the life of me understand why
:->> anyone would -want- the NumLock -on- all the time.
:->
:->1- The inverted-T cursor section serves more reliably, segretating basic
:->movement from other functions

I don't use the numpad for cursor movement either. I started with
computers long before there was a numpad and learned to use the top
keys for numbers. AFAIAC they could leave the pad off the keyboard
completely, I wouldn't miss it.

:->2- Once one learns to use a ten-key for entering numbers, any other
:->method for enterning a significant amount of them is ludicrous. If your
:->accountant or bookkeeper didn't have the numpad, you would be paying her
:->for more hours.

Since I don't have an accountant or bookeeper, this is irrelevant.


Using OS/2 Warp 4!
Wausau, WI. 44d 58m 00s N x 89d 36m 45s W
All opinions are mine alone, you go get your own!

 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Joe Kova » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00





>>As an accountant myself, I can't for the life of me understand why OS/2
>>insists on turning off NUM when the PC BIOS has been told to turn it on.
>Couldn't agree more.  I'm also an accountant and MUST have my numlock
>on at all times.  This has been complained about since OS/2 2.0 at
>least.  IBM refuses to make any changes.  They won't even let us have
>the option of setting a default in config.sys.

DOS starts with the numlock key on.  I hate that key on,
so when I ran DOS I put a utility in the autoexec.bat that
turned it off.

OS/2 starts with the numlock key off, and I'm very happy
with that.  Now it's your turn for awhile.   :^)

More seriously, I do hate that key on and so do most others,
as IBM knows full well.  You can post the advantages of
having it on all you want, it won't make any difference.

Thing is, this is a surprisingly heavily polarized issue.
Half of everybody firmly wants it on, and the other half
_has to have the OS start with it off.  I guess it's very
* the folks who write OSs, although I'm surprised that
IBM won't slip a config.sys option into one of the fixpaks.

There are several good small utilities on hobbes and the
IBM ftp site, meant for the startup folder, that will leave
the numlock key on just like Dos does just the way your
want it. This was a big concern when OS/2 v2.0 came out,
they date from then, and they should be quite invisible for
you.  I don't know willutil.

Joe Kovacs
Guelph Ontario Canada

 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Paul Ratcliff » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



> More seriously, I do hate that key on and so do most others,
> as IBM knows full well.

What utter crap. I presume you have statistics to back up your arrogant
claim?
 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Felix Miat » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00




> writes:



> :->> :->As an accountant myself, I can't for the life of me understand why OS/2
> :->> :->insists on turning off NUM when the PC BIOS has been told to turn it on.
> :->> Another opinion;
> :->> As a non-accountant myself, I can't for the life of me understand why
> :->> anyone would -want- the NumLock -on- all the time.
> :->1- The inverted-T cursor section serves more reliably, segretating basic
> :->movement from other functions
> I don't use the numpad for cursor movement either. I started with
> computers long before there was a numpad and learned to use the top
> keys for numbers. AFAIAC they could leave the pad off the keyboard
> completely, I wouldn't miss it.

Sure you wouldn't, but you don't input many numbers. Either that or you
are oblivious to the efficiency of the ten-key, which is to a Pentium as
a top row number set is to an 8088. An accountant who at his first job
out of college doesn't learn ten-key soon gets fired.

Quote:> :->2- Once one learns to use a ten-key for entering numbers, any other
> :->method for enterning a significant amount of them is ludicrous. If your
> :->accountant or bookkeeper didn't have the numpad, you would be paying her
> :->for more hours.
> Since I don't have an accountant or bookeeper, this is irrelevant.

You flunked the relevance test. "You" didn't have an exclusively
singular meaning. Most businesses have accountants and/or bookkeepers.
The more they must pay them, the more their products and services cost
you (plural), the general public.

It should be a simple thing for the OS to accept whatever the BIOS has
been set to as a user preference to be honored until such time as the
NUM key is pressed. Just as easily the OS could have a config setting.
Everyone should be happy either way, with no need for any preference
polarization.
--
"   While just government protects all in their religious rights, true
religion affords to Government its surest support."        George
Washington

Stop Internet Spam        ***        http://www.abuse.net

Team OS/2        ***        SCSI ONLY since 1990

Felix Miata        ***        http://www.gate.net/~mrmazda

 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Magnus Olss » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



> I don't use the numpad for cursor movement either. I started with
> computers long before there was a numpad and learned to use the top
> keys for numbers. AFAIAC they could leave the pad off the keyboard
> completely, I wouldn't miss it.

[...]

> Using OS/2 Warp 4!
> Wausau, WI. 44d 58m 00s N x 89d 36m 45s W
> All opinions are mine alone, you go get your own!

I'm sorry, but I just can't help sharing your opinon on the numpad
issue:-)

-
Magnus Olsson
Author of WarpCalc

"Books are like a mirror. If an ass looks in, you can't expect an
angel to look out."
 - Arthur Schopenhauer

 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Dave Parso » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



> It should be a simple thing for the OS to accept whatever the BIOS has
> been set to as a user preference to be honored until such time as the
> NUM key is pressed. Just as easily the OS could have a config setting.
> Everyone should be happy either way, with no need for any preference
> polarization.
> --

Agreed.
Personally I normally only use the numeric key pad to enter non standard
characters together with the ALT key  such as the English pound sign
ALT156 () on a German keyboard.
I use the command line a lot and my biggest complaint in this area is that the
default is mode is 'overstrike' not 'insert' and isn't user definable. This surely
could be an easy config setting as it is in a DOS session.

Dave

 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Magnus Olss » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00





> > It should be a simple thing for the OS to accept whatever the BIOS has
> > been set to as a user preference to be honored until such time as the
> > NUM key is pressed. Just as easily the OS could have a config setting.
> > Everyone should be happy either way, with no need for any preference
> > polarization.
> > --

> Agreed.
> Personally I normally only use the numeric key pad to enter non standard
> characters together with the ALT key  such as the English pound sign
> ALT156 () on a German keyboard.
> I use the command line a lot and my biggest complaint in this area is that the
> default is mode is 'overstrike' not 'insert' and isn't user definable. This surely
> could be an easy config setting as it is in a DOS session.

This is, atleast to me, a significant flaw in OS/2 (the num lock
setting pales in comparison). In addition I feel the use of a block
cursor to indicate insert mode to be counter intuitive. Even worse,
you have to reenter insert mode for every command. I have a hard time
understanding why it wasn't fixed in the Warp 4 facelift:-(

-
Magnus Olsson
Author of WarpCalc

"In these days, a man who says a thing cannot be done is quite apt to
be interrupted by some idiot doing it."
 - Elbert Green Hubbard

 
 
 

numlock command?

Post by Jerry Laph » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00




Quote:> As a non-accountant myself, I can't for the life of me understand why
> anyone would -want- the NumLock -on- all the time.

Why not?  Don't you use the dedicated arrow keys?  If IBM hadn't been too
cheap to include dedicated arrow keys on the orginal IBM PC keyboard,
there wouldn't even *be* a NUMLOCK. --
============================================================
Jerry Lapham, Monroe, OH

Written Sunday, June 07, 1998 - 10:30 PM (EDT)
============================================================
MR/2 Ice tag:  Wear tank tops.  Support the right to bare arms.
 
 
 

1. ctrl-numlock-numlock nuked floppy controller?!?

Ok, here's an odd one...

I had a trap e the other day (still having problems with this dimaond viper
video card...).  Rather than hit the reset button or power off, I followed
the suggestion in OS/2 Warp Unleashed and hit cntrl-numlock numlock for a
memory dump.  When I got the prompt for to insert a floppy, I hit cntrl-alt-
delete.  OS/2 Warp Unleashed claims that by doing this the odds of file
system damage are greatly reduced, and that the net effect is much less hard
on the operating system, particularly the file system (as opposed to hitting
rest or powering off)  [top of page 945].

Well, after I did this, I tried to boot os/2 from a floppy to perform a
chkdsk...no dice.  I used boot-manger to boot dos from a dos only partition,
and I couldn't recognize the floppy drive.  I booted OS/2, and it wouldn't
recognize the floppy.  So I figured, maybe I had a lemon floppy and the
cntrl-numlcok numlock thing did it in...I put in another floppy drive and the
system wouldn't recognize it, either.  I swapped cables, no luck.  I checked
the bios settings, they hadn't been touched.  I reconfigured the floppy to
drive B using the bios and hooked it up as drive B...nothing.  So, all I'm
left with is that the gizmos that control the floppy must have been nuked.  
Everything else runs just fine, I've been up and running for 2 days with no
floppy access.  My disk controller is built into the board, I haven't gotten
around to disabling it and trying a card-based controller yet.

I don't know too much about the hardware angle, but is this actually
possible? Could I have nuked the floppy controller w/o nuking anything else?  
And how could the cntrl-numlock numlock routine done this?  I know as soon as
you hit it, the drive starts spinning so it can tell when a floppy is
inserted, but I would expect if that were to cause problems, it would be in
the drive itself, not the controller part.

Oh yeah, I hooked the original drive up to another system...works fine.

Any clues?

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