Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by norm.raph.. » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 05:32:24



Is HP going shopping?
Hewlett-Packard is said to be interested in buying software and services
companies.
June 23, 2003: 1:49 PM EDT
By Paul R. La Monica, CNN/Money Senior Writer

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - A little more than a year since Hewlett-Packard
completed its purchase of Compaq, the company may be gearing up for more
deals.

Such rumors have been circulating since CEO Carly Fiorina said at an
analysts meeting earlier this month that services and software are two
areas where the company might look to acquire companies. HP was not
available for further comment for this story.

Wall Street has warmed to HP (HPQ) in recent months as the company
continues to narrow losses in its enterprise division -- which sells
storage and servers -- and makes improvements in its personal computer
segment, which competes aggressively with Dell Computer.

Still, further moves to diversify away from these two notoriously tough
businesses would probably be welcomed. "Anything HP can do to move away
from the eroding margin business of hardware would make sense," said Adam
Adelman, senior technology analyst with Philippe Asset Management, a New
York-based asset management firm. He does not have a position in HP.

                            A "bear" of a deal?

Fiorina already has tried to make a big move into services, when it offered
to buy the consulting business of PricewaterhouseCoopers in 2000. The two
companies could not agree on a price. IBM wound up scooping up PwC's
consulting division last year.

HP increased its presence in the services business through the Compaq deal
but it still has a long way to go to catch IBM, said John Rutledge, manager
of the Evergreen Technology fund, which owns shares of HP and IBM.

The services business is attractive because of its relative stability --
big companies typically sign multi-year outsourcing contracts, such as HP's
recent $3 billion, 10-year deal to run Procter & Gamble's IT services --
and it could also give HP the opportunity to sell more of its computers,
servers and printers.

"HP would benefit from a services acquisition. It's a great entre for
additional business," Rutledge said.

But Rutledge said he doubts that HP would want to do a truly large deal so
soon after the Compaq merger. So that probably would rule out companies
like the struggling EDS, which has an $11 billion market value, as well as
other major players in tech services, including Affiliated Computer
Services ($6.4 billion market cap), Computer Sciences ($7.8 billion) and
Accenture ($16.8 billion market value).

Still, Rutledge said that BearingPoint (BE), formerly known as KPMG
Consulting, could be an interesting takeover candidate since its market
value is less than $2 billion. A spokesman for BearingPoint would not
comment.

                          Searching for software

On the software side, don't expect HP to get involved in the
PeopleSoft-Oracle fracas, even though PeopleSoft disclosed in a regulatory
filing Friday that it would consider a so-called "white knight" bid.

Robert Cihra, an analyst with Fulcrum Global Partners, said HP would be
unlikely to buy a major application software company like PeopleSoft, which
sells products that help companies manage their customers, supplier and
human resource functions. He doesn't own the stock and Fulcrum does not
perform investment banking.

But Cihra said a storage software company or infrastructure software
company would be a good fit with HP's enterprise business division.

Storage software developer Legato Systems (LGTO) could be a fairly easy
deal for HP to do, according to Michael Mahoney, managing director of EGM
Capital, which runs a hedge fund focusing on technology, telecom and media
companies. Legato would not comment.

Mahoney pointed out that HP already is Legato's largest reseller of
software so the companies are fairly familiar with each other. Plus,
Legato's market value is only $887 million. Legato was the subject of
takeover rumors earlier this year. EMC, a competitor of HP in the storage
business, was the mentioned suitor.

BEA Systems, which develops infrastructure software that helps companies
manage e-commerce capabilities, has been mentioned as a possible target for
HP as well. Rutledge said BEA (BEAS), which competes against IBM's software
division, could be a target since it has struggled as of late. The company
reported in May that its first quarter licensing revenue fell from a year
ago.

And despite the big tech rally, shares of BEA are down 4.5 percent year to
date. Still, BEA would be a bigger deal for HP to digest, with a market
value of nearly $4.5 billion. BEA did not return a call for comment.

HP's stock has surged 42 percent since March 11, which could make its
shares more attractive to takeover targets. Plus, the company had $13.7
billion in cash on its balance sheet as of April 30. So even though HP may
not be itching to a deal just yet, it clearly has the financial strength to
pull something off.

Find this article at:
http://money.cnn.com/2003/06/23/technology/hp/index.htm

 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by John Smit » Thu, 26 Jun 2003 11:09:07


I think buying an advertising agency that has a clue would be money
better spent.


Is HP going shopping?
Hewlett-Packard is said to be interested in buying software and
services
companies.
June 23, 2003: 1:49 PM EDT
By Paul R. La Monica, CNN/Money Senior Writer

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - A little more than a year since Hewlett-Packard
completed its purchase of Compaq, the company may be gearing up for
more
deals.

Such rumors have been circulating since CEO Carly Fiorina said at an
analysts meeting earlier this month that services and software are two
areas where the company might look to acquire companies. HP was not
available for further comment for this story.

Wall Street has warmed to HP (HPQ) in recent months as the company
continues to narrow losses in its enterprise division -- which sells
storage and servers -- and makes improvements in its personal computer
segment, which competes aggressively with Dell Computer.

Still, further moves to diversify away from these two notoriously
tough
businesses would probably be welcomed. "Anything HP can do to move
away
from the eroding margin business of hardware would make sense," said
Adam
Adelman, senior technology analyst with Philippe Asset Management, a
New
York-based asset management firm. He does not have a position in HP.

                            A "bear" of a deal?

Fiorina already has tried to make a big move into services, when it
offered
to buy the consulting business of PricewaterhouseCoopers in 2000. The
two
companies could not agree on a price. IBM wound up scooping up PwC's
consulting division last year.

HP increased its presence in the services business through the Compaq
deal
but it still has a long way to go to catch IBM, said John Rutledge,
manager
of the Evergreen Technology fund, which owns shares of HP and IBM.

The services business is attractive because of its relative
stability --
big companies typically sign multi-year outsourcing contracts, such as
HP's
recent $3 billion, 10-year deal to run Procter & Gamble's IT
services --
and it could also give HP the opportunity to sell more of its
computers,
servers and printers.

"HP would benefit from a services acquisition. It's a great entre for
additional business," Rutledge said.

But Rutledge said he doubts that HP would want to do a truly large
deal so
soon after the Compaq merger. So that probably would rule out
companies
like the struggling EDS, which has an $11 billion market value, as
well as
other major players in tech services, including Affiliated Computer
Services ($6.4 billion market cap), Computer Sciences ($7.8 billion)
and
Accenture ($16.8 billion market value).

Still, Rutledge said that BearingPoint (BE), formerly known as KPMG
Consulting, could be an interesting takeover candidate since its
market
value is less than $2 billion. A spokesman for BearingPoint would not
comment.

                          Searching for software

On the software side, don't expect HP to get involved in the
PeopleSoft-Oracle fracas, even though PeopleSoft disclosed in a
regulatory
filing Friday that it would consider a so-called "white knight" bid.

Robert Cihra, an analyst with Fulcrum Global Partners, said HP would
be
unlikely to buy a major application software company like PeopleSoft,
which
sells products that help companies manage their customers, supplier
and
human resource functions. He doesn't own the stock and Fulcrum does
not
perform investment banking.

But Cihra said a storage software company or infrastructure software
company would be a good fit with HP's enterprise business division.

Storage software developer Legato Systems (LGTO) could be a fairly
easy
deal for HP to do, according to Michael Mahoney, managing director of
EGM
Capital, which runs a hedge fund focusing on technology, telecom and
media
companies. Legato would not comment.

Mahoney pointed out that HP already is Legato's largest reseller of
software so the companies are fairly familiar with each other. Plus,
Legato's market value is only $887 million. Legato was the subject of
takeover rumors earlier this year. EMC, a competitor of HP in the
storage
business, was the mentioned suitor.

BEA Systems, which develops infrastructure software that helps
companies
manage e-commerce capabilities, has been mentioned as a possible
target for
HP as well. Rutledge said BEA (BEAS), which competes against IBM's
software
division, could be a target since it has struggled as of late. The
company
reported in May that its first quarter licensing revenue fell from a
year
ago.

And despite the big tech rally, shares of BEA are down 4.5 percent
year to
date. Still, BEA would be a bigger deal for HP to digest, with a
market
value of nearly $4.5 billion. BEA did not return a call for comment.

HP's stock has surged 42 percent since March 11, which could make its
shares more attractive to takeover targets. Plus, the company had
$13.7
billion in cash on its balance sheet as of April 30. So even though HP
may
not be itching to a deal just yet, it clearly has the financial
strength to
pull something off.

Find this article at:
http://money.cnn.com/2003/06/23/technology/hp/index.htm

 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by Andrew Harrison SUNUK Consultanc » Thu, 26 Jun 2003 19:31:28



> Is HP going shopping?
> Hewlett-Packard is said to be interested in buying software and services
> companies.
> June 23, 2003: 1:49 PM EDT
> By Paul R. La Monica, CNN/Money Senior Writer

> NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - A little more than a year since Hewlett-Packard
> completed its purchase of Compaq, the company may be gearing up for more
> deals.

> Such rumors have been circulating since CEO Carly Fiorina said at an
> analysts meeting earlier this month that services and software are two
> areas where the company might look to acquire companies. HP was not
> available for further comment for this story.

> Wall Street has warmed to HP (HPQ) in recent months as the company
> continues to narrow losses in its enterprise division -- which sells
> storage and servers -- and makes improvements in its personal computer
> segment, which competes aggressively with Dell Computer.

Interesting that the reporter has swallowed the HP numbers
game hook line and sinker. Losses havn't narrowed, HP have
just changed they way they report their numbers.

As it has already been pointed out if you restate the old
pre R&D not being a cost to a divison accounts using the
new rules you find that the enterprise division is actually
doing worse now than it was then.

Amazing, all that restructuring effort over the years and
all HP really needed to do was change they way they reported
their accounts.

As Scott says profitability is an opinion cash is fact, HP
illustrate this better than most.

Regards
Andrew Harrison

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> Still, further moves to diversify away from these two notoriously tough
> businesses would probably be welcomed. "Anything HP can do to move away
> from the eroding margin business of hardware would make sense," said Adam
> Adelman, senior technology analyst with Philippe Asset Management, a New
> York-based asset management firm. He does not have a position in HP.

>                             A "bear" of a deal?

> Fiorina already has tried to make a big move into services, when it offered
> to buy the consulting business of PricewaterhouseCoopers in 2000. The two
> companies could not agree on a price. IBM wound up scooping up PwC's
> consulting division last year.

> HP increased its presence in the services business through the Compaq deal
> but it still has a long way to go to catch IBM, said John Rutledge, manager
> of the Evergreen Technology fund, which owns shares of HP and IBM.

> The services business is attractive because of its relative stability --
> big companies typically sign multi-year outsourcing contracts, such as HP's
> recent $3 billion, 10-year deal to run Procter & Gamble's IT services --
> and it could also give HP the opportunity to sell more of its computers,
> servers and printers.

> "HP would benefit from a services acquisition. It's a great entre for
> additional business," Rutledge said.

> But Rutledge said he doubts that HP would want to do a truly large deal so
> soon after the Compaq merger. So that probably would rule out companies
> like the struggling EDS, which has an $11 billion market value, as well as
> other major players in tech services, including Affiliated Computer
> Services ($6.4 billion market cap), Computer Sciences ($7.8 billion) and
> Accenture ($16.8 billion market value).

> Still, Rutledge said that BearingPoint (BE), formerly known as KPMG
> Consulting, could be an interesting takeover candidate since its market
> value is less than $2 billion. A spokesman for BearingPoint would not
> comment.

>                           Searching for software

> On the software side, don't expect HP to get involved in the
> PeopleSoft-Oracle fracas, even though PeopleSoft disclosed in a regulatory
> filing Friday that it would consider a so-called "white knight" bid.

> Robert Cihra, an analyst with Fulcrum Global Partners, said HP would be
> unlikely to buy a major application software company like PeopleSoft, which
> sells products that help companies manage their customers, supplier and
> human resource functions. He doesn't own the stock and Fulcrum does not
> perform investment banking.

> But Cihra said a storage software company or infrastructure software
> company would be a good fit with HP's enterprise business division.

> Storage software developer Legato Systems (LGTO) could be a fairly easy
> deal for HP to do, according to Michael Mahoney, managing director of EGM
> Capital, which runs a hedge fund focusing on technology, telecom and media
> companies. Legato would not comment.

> Mahoney pointed out that HP already is Legato's largest reseller of
> software so the companies are fairly familiar with each other. Plus,
> Legato's market value is only $887 million. Legato was the subject of
> takeover rumors earlier this year. EMC, a competitor of HP in the storage
> business, was the mentioned suitor.

> BEA Systems, which develops infrastructure software that helps companies
> manage e-commerce capabilities, has been mentioned as a possible target for
> HP as well. Rutledge said BEA (BEAS), which competes against IBM's software
> division, could be a target since it has struggled as of late. The company
> reported in May that its first quarter licensing revenue fell from a year
> ago.

> And despite the big tech rally, shares of BEA are down 4.5 percent year to
> date. Still, BEA would be a bigger deal for HP to digest, with a market
> value of nearly $4.5 billion. BEA did not return a call for comment.

> HP's stock has surged 42 percent since March 11, which could make its
> shares more attractive to takeover targets. Plus, the company had $13.7
> billion in cash on its balance sheet as of April 30. So even though HP may
> not be itching to a deal just yet, it clearly has the financial strength to
> pull something off.

> Find this article at:
> http://money.cnn.com/2003/06/23/technology/hp/index.htm

 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by Robert Klut » Fri, 27 Jun 2003 04:27:33


On Wed, 25 Jun 2003 11:31:28 +0100, Andrew Harrison SUNUK Consultancy



>> But Rutledge said he doubts that HP would want to do a truly large deal so
>> soon after the Compaq merger. So that probably would rule out companies
>> like the struggling EDS, which has an $11 billion market value, as well as
>> other major players in tech services, including Affiliated Computer
>> Services ($6.4 billion market cap), Computer Sciences ($7.8 billion) and
>> Accenture ($16.8 billion market value).

While I work for HP, I can guarantee you that neither Carly or anyone
else ever confides in me what the management of the company is even
thinking about doing.  That said, here are some purely personal
assessments on the subject.

Quote:>> Robert Cihra, an analyst with Fulcrum Global Partners, said HP would be
>> unlikely to buy a major application software company like PeopleSoft, which
>> sells products that help companies manage their customers, supplier and
>> human resource functions. He doesn't own the stock and Fulcrum does not
>> perform investment banking.

HP could, I suppose, but that would definitely put major crimps in it's
relationships with Oracle and SAP.  Not a good thing.

Quote:>> Storage software developer Legato Systems (LGTO) could be a fairly easy
>> deal for HP to do, according to Michael Mahoney, managing director of EGM
>> Capital, which runs a hedge fund focusing on technology, telecom and media
>> companies. Legato would not comment.

>> Mahoney pointed out that HP already is Legato's largest reseller of
>> software so the companies are fairly familiar with each other. Plus,
>> Legato's market value is only $887 million. Legato was the subject of
>> takeover rumors earlier this year. EMC, a competitor of HP in the storage
>> business, was the mentioned suitor.

Legato is a money losing operation.  The majority of their revenue comes
from the licensing and support of NetWorker, which is a direct
competitor of HP's OmniBack/DataProtector product.   SO, first, after
stripping away the redundant Networker product, HP would be paying big
bucks to get a customer base, and some interesting products that don't
make much revenue.  Second, unless the SEC sees HP as a savior from
chapter 11, I don't see that happening even with the Bush Laissez-Faire
policies.

Quote:

>> BEA Systems, which develops infrastructure software that helps companies
>> manage e-commerce capabilities, has been mentioned as a possible target for
>> HP as well. Rutledge said BEA (BEAS), which competes against IBM's software
>> division, could be a target since it has struggled as of late. The company
>> reported in May that its first quarter licensing revenue fell from a year
>> ago.

>> And despite the big tech rally, shares of BEA are down 4.5 percent year to
>> date. Still, BEA would be a bigger deal for HP to digest, with a market
>> value of nearly $4.5 billion. BEA did not return a call for comment.

With Sun and SunOne, IBM with WebSphere, and Microsoft hating
competition, who is BEA going to align with?  HP.  So why would HP buy
company that is committed by circumstance to it?  Especially after it
bought and killed BlueStone?
 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by JF Meze » Fri, 27 Jun 2003 04:43:26



> Is HP going shopping?
> Hewlett-Packard is said to be interested in buying software and services
> companies.

Reminds me of Capellas "will re-engineer Compaq in 180 days" which included
exactlty that plan. Turned out that Capellas wasn't seeking to buy, buy rather
seeking to be bought.

Problem is that there is nobody left to buy HP.

 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by JF Meze » Fri, 27 Jun 2003 04:47:55



> I think buying an advertising agency that has a clue would be money
> better spent.

No. HP can do well in advertising for the stuff it wants to advertise. Having
the best advertising firm in the world wouldn't change anything if the
decision at the top is made to keep VMS secret.
 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by John Smit » Fri, 27 Jun 2003 13:47:06



> On Wed, 25 Jun 2003 11:31:28 +0100, Andrew Harrison SUNUK
Consultancy


> >> But Rutledge said he doubts that HP would want to do a truly
large deal so
> >> soon after the Compaq merger. So that probably would rule out
companies
> >> like the struggling EDS, which has an $11 billion market value,
as well as
> >> other major players in tech services, including Affiliated
Computer
> >> Services ($6.4 billion market cap), Computer Sciences ($7.8
billion) and
> >> Accenture ($16.8 billion market value).

> While I work for HP, I can guarantee you that neither Carly or
anyone
> else ever confides in me what the management of the company is even
> thinking about doing.  That said, here are some purely personal
> assessments on the subject.

> >> Robert Cihra, an analyst with Fulcrum Global Partners, said HP
would be
> >> unlikely to buy a major application software company like
PeopleSoft, which
> >> sells products that help companies manage their customers,
supplier and
> >> human resource functions. He doesn't own the stock and Fulcrum
does not
> >> perform investment banking.

> HP could, I suppose, but that would definitely put major crimps in
it's
> relationships with Oracle and SAP.  Not a good thing.

Absolutlely correct. If HP did that, Larry would kill Rdb and Oracle
on VMS faster than you could say 'Sayonara' (the name of his yacht).
Goodbye $2-4B annual VMS sales, goodbye $500-800MM in VMS annual
profits (depending upon whose numbers you believe).

And while we're on it.....HP, and VMS specifically, is hostage to
Oracle for without the last remaining major commercial relational dbms
available on VMS, VMS's goose is well and truly cooked. MySQL is nice,
but it isn't Oracle or Rdb.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:> >> Storage software developer Legato Systems (LGTO) could be a
fairly easy
> >> deal for HP to do, according to Michael Mahoney, managing
director of EGM
> >> Capital, which runs a hedge fund focusing on technology, telecom
and media
> >> companies. Legato would not comment.

> >> Mahoney pointed out that HP already is Legato's largest reseller
of
> >> software so the companies are fairly familiar with each other.
Plus,
> >> Legato's market value is only $887 million. Legato was the
subject of
> >> takeover rumors earlier this year. EMC, a competitor of HP in the
storage
> >> business, was the mentioned suitor.

> Legato is a money losing operation.  The majority of their revenue
comes
> from the licensing and support of NetWorker, which is a direct
> competitor of HP's OmniBack/DataProtector product.   SO, first,
after
> stripping away the redundant Networker product, HP would be paying
big
> bucks to get a customer base, and some interesting products that
don't
> make much revenue.  Second, unless the SEC sees HP as a savior from
> chapter 11, I don't see that happening even with the Bush
Laissez-Faire
> policies.

> >> BEA Systems, which develops infrastructure software that helps
companies
> >> manage e-commerce capabilities, has been mentioned as a possible
target for
> >> HP as well. Rutledge said BEA (BEAS), which competes against
IBM's software
> >> division, could be a target since it has struggled as of late.
The company
> >> reported in May that its first quarter licensing revenue fell
from a year
> >> ago.

> >> And despite the big tech rally, shares of BEA are down 4.5
percent year to
> >> date. Still, BEA would be a bigger deal for HP to digest, with a
market
> >> value of nearly $4.5 billion. BEA did not return a call for

comment.

Why would HP want to buy back all the software they recently 'gave' to
BEA, not to mention stuff Digital/Compaq 'gave away' as having no
strategic value?

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> With Sun and SunOne, IBM with WebSphere, and Microsoft hating
> competition, who is BEA going to align with?  HP.  So why would HP
buy
> company that is committed by circumstance to it?  Especially after
it
> bought and killed BlueStone?

 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by Bob Koehl » Fri, 27 Jun 2003 22:08:07



Quote:> Absolutlely correct. If HP did that, Larry would kill Rdb and Oracle
> on VMS faster than you could say 'Sayonara' (the name of his yacht).
> Goodbye $2-4B annual VMS sales, goodbye $500-800MM in VMS annual
> profits (depending upon whose numbers you believe).

   I know its hard for some folks to believe, but out in the real world
   there are a hell of a lot of computers running applications that
   don't have and don't need Oracle or any other DBMS.

   Especially true if you have an OS with a working file system.

 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by Robert Klut » Sat, 28 Jun 2003 02:15:53





>> Absolutlely correct. If HP did that, Larry would kill Rdb and Oracle
>> on VMS faster than you could say 'Sayonara' (the name of his yacht).
>> Goodbye $2-4B annual VMS sales, goodbye $500-800MM in VMS annual
>> profits (depending upon whose numbers you believe).

>   I know its hard for some folks to believe, but out in the real world
>   there are a hell of a lot of computers running applications that
>   don't have and don't need Oracle or any other DBMS.

>   Especially true if you have an OS with a working file system.

File systems are a lousy way to manage data.  For a lot of applications
it is good enough.  Somewhere I remember reading (no I can't cite) that
80% of the servers sold (in dollar volume) ran an RDBMS (Oracle, Sybase,
Informix, DB2, MS-SQL).  So, for hardware vendors, databases are the
killer app for servers.  
 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by John Smit » Sat, 28 Jun 2003 02:21:36


I agree with that, but most apps these days in the commercial arena
use a relational dbms.



Quote:> In article



> > Absolutlely correct. If HP did that, Larry would kill Rdb and
Oracle
> > on VMS faster than you could say 'Sayonara' (the name of his
yacht).
> > Goodbye $2-4B annual VMS sales, goodbye $500-800MM in VMS annual
> > profits (depending upon whose numbers you believe).

>    I know its hard for some folks to believe, but out in the real
world
>    there are a hell of a lot of computers running applications that
>    don't have and don't need Oracle or any other DBMS.

>    Especially true if you have an OS with a working file system.

 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by Bill Tod » Sat, 28 Jun 2003 04:14:16







> >> Absolutlely correct. If HP did that, Larry would kill Rdb and Oracle
> >> on VMS faster than you could say 'Sayonara' (the name of his yacht).
> >> Goodbye $2-4B annual VMS sales, goodbye $500-800MM in VMS annual
> >> profits (depending upon whose numbers you believe).

> >   I know its hard for some folks to believe, but out in the real world
> >   there are a hell of a lot of computers running applications that
> >   don't have and don't need Oracle or any other DBMS.

> >   Especially true if you have an OS with a working file system.

> File systems are a lousy way to manage data.

Unfortunately true for most current implementations.

However, another truth is that databases - especially, relational
databases - are very often even worse ways to manage data.

- bill

 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by John Smit » Sat, 28 Jun 2003 04:19:55


I should qualify that...

Most applications and developers prefer to use a rdbms for reason of
easier maintenance of code, 'portability' of both applications and
programmers, and the ability to more easily manipulate data.

That said, there are times when using a native file system provides
better performance, or the application doesn't call for a rdbms, or
there isn't money in the budget for an rdbms.

But these days, the last reason is mostly a moot point with a dbms
like MySQL available on VMS.


> I agree with that, but most apps these days in the commercial arena
> use a relational dbms.



> > In article


> > > Absolutlely correct. If HP did that, Larry would kill Rdb and
> Oracle
> > > on VMS faster than you could say 'Sayonara' (the name of his
> yacht).
> > > Goodbye $2-4B annual VMS sales, goodbye $500-800MM in VMS annual
> > > profits (depending upon whose numbers you believe).

> >    I know its hard for some folks to believe, but out in the real
> world
> >    there are a hell of a lot of computers running applications
that
> >    don't have and don't need Oracle or any other DBMS.

> >    Especially true if you have an OS with a working file system.

 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by Bob Koehl » Sat, 28 Jun 2003 05:21:20



Quote:> File systems are a lousy way to manage data.

   You sound like a DBMS salesman.  Good file systems are great ways to
   manage data, that's why almost all modern computers are sold with
   at least a half way file system.

   Only some of them also get DBMS's and lots of those are there because
   the file system was only half decent or the application designer
   didn't know better.

   90% of the DBMS installations I've seen do things that a $1200 ISAM
   package could do.  Real file systems have ISAM or a superset built in.

 
 
 

Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.

Post by JF Meze » Sat, 28 Jun 2003 06:17:34



>    90% of the DBMS installations I've seen do things that a $1200 ISAM
>    package could do.  Real file systems have ISAM or a superset built in.

My old PSION series 3c PDA has an ISAM implementation built in. 2 meg of RAM,
(for running and storage) and it has ISAM built in !

Why doesn't DOS/Windows have some ISAM built-in ? Imagine how different the
software world would be. Oracle and other large database makers would have a
much smaller market of only the largest databases.

 
 
 

1. databases on VMS (was: RE: Hewlett-Packard said to be interested in buying software and services companies.)

Though of course Rdb customers provide revenue to HP because they buy
hardware and software from HP, they also provide a huge amount of
revenue to Oracle.  Whether Larry would cut his own stream to spite HP I
don't know.

In any case, Rdb on VMS shows no signs of going away.  While the number
of customers might not be large in absolute terms, they do generate a
lot of revenue for Oracle and HP.

IF Rdb goes away, one can always run Mimer.  I HAVE NO EXPERIENCE WITH
THIS PRODUCT, I just know that it runs on VMS and that it is actively
being developed and supported (yes, on VMS as well).  So, folks who want
to run database applications on VMS look to be pretty safe.  Obviously,
if they run VMS, they don't care about the trade rags' platform du jour.
As far as interaction goes, there are enough standardised database
interfaces so that pretty much any system can interact with a database
on a VMS system.

See

   http://www.mimer.se/

for some information on Mimer in general and

   http://www.mimer.com/customerspartnersItem.asp?secId=177&itemId=45

for information on Mimer on Itanium.

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