Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by TYMOTHY D » Mon, 29 Jul 1996 04:00:00



I am a Amiga games collector and am looking for the following
games:

  256 color version of King's Quest VI
  256 color version of Wing Commander (for AGA machine)
  Alternate Reality(very old game)

For the first two I am ONLY interested in 256 color
versions. If they don't exist, please tell me.
If you have any of these games, contact me and
tell me how much you would part with them for,
and I will take them off your hands. I will
pay shipping also.  MUST be originals with
all documentation and fully working.

Thanks,
Timothy

 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by Andrei Galins » Tue, 30 Jul 1996 04:00:00




>Subject: Re: Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.
>Date: Mon, 29 Jul 1996 12:17:46 +0100


>> I am a Amiga games collector and am looking for the following
>> games:

>>   256 color version of King's Quest VI
>>   256 color version of Wing Commander (for AGA machine)
>Pretty sure neither of these exist, but I could be wrong.

Verdammt nochmal...
You seem to have missed too much from Amiga world recently... :(
Dunno about KQVI, but WingCom256cols has been around
for quite a long time...
You'll need an accelerator to play the later, Tim.
It's a CD32 version and it uses Akiko. It's unplayable on a stock A1200.

I decided to leave Alex's "not many people have A1200" statement
uncommented ( maybe fearing awesome Irish-accent bombs ?) ;) ,
but now I just can't help commenting :just take a look at Amiga Joker's survey
- even if A1200 is not prevailing, the percentage of A1200 users is really
_big_ and it will grow!!! That's for Germany ( in Russia - the same ), dunno
if that's true for England or USA...

Regards,

Andrei "JEDI" Galinski

Quote:>Alex Amsel
>Silltunna Software Ltd.
>"Burn Hollywood Burn...Take Down Tinsel Town" - Leftfield


 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by Alex Amse » Tue, 30 Jul 1996 04:00:00




> I am a Amiga games collector and am looking for the following
> games:

>   256 color version of King's Quest VI
>   256 color version of Wing Commander (for AGA machine)

Pretty sure neither of these exist, but I could be wrong.

Alex Amsel
Silltunna Software Ltd.
"Burn Hollywood Burn...Take Down Tinsel Town" - Leftfield

 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by Jan Viet » Tue, 30 Jul 1996 04:00:00



zu "Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality." wichtigmachen:

Quote:

> I am a Amiga games collector and am looking for the following
> games:

>   256 color version of King's Quest VI
>   256 color version of Wing Commander (for AGA machine)
>   Alternate Reality(very old game)

KQ6 was only released as an ECS version. WiCo exists in a 256 colours CD32
version, which doesn't run on a A1200/4000 with CD-ROM.

Quote:

> For the first two I am ONLY interested in 256 color
> versions. If they don't exist, please tell me.
> If you have any of these games, contact me and
> tell me how much you would part with them for,
> and I will take them off your hands. I will
> pay shipping also.  MUST be originals with
> all documentation and fully working.

***** ***** ***** ****         ***************************** A4000/030 50Mhz
*       *   *   * *   *        *                           * Quad CD-ROM

    *   *   *   * *   *        *                           * 1GB HD
*****   *   *   * *   *        ***************************** OS3.1

Die berhmten letzten Worte des Ataris: "Ich siege!"(Japan. atari=ich siege)

Verkaufe:SimAnt 20DM,WWF Wrestlemania 10DM,Oldtimer AGA 35DM,
WWF European Rampage 15DM,SSF2T CD32 30DM alles VHB und fr Amiga
Suche:Robin Hood-Conquests of the Longbow (Sierra),It came from the Desert
Datadisk "Antheads",Darkseed CD32, Tower * CD32, SWIV, Silk Worm

 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by Alex Amse » Wed, 31 Jul 1996 04:00:00




> You seem to have missed too much from Amiga world recently... :(
> Dunno about KQVI, but WingCom256cols has been around
> for quite a long time...

<hide>

Quote:> You'll need an accelerator to play the later, Tim.
> It's a CD32 version and it uses Akiko. It's unplayable on a stock

A1200.

That explains why I didn`t see it.

Quote:> I decided to leave Alex's "not many people have A1200" statement
> uncommented ( maybe fearing awesome Irish-accent bombs ?) ;) ,

Not many people compared to A500 owners. The thing is, the proof is in
the sales. I mean, Amiga games aren`t THAT bad, yet sales are horrific.

Quote:> but now I just can't help commenting :just take a look at Amiga
Joker's survey
> - even if A1200 is not prevailing, the percentage of A1200 users is
really
> _big_ and it will grow!!! That's for Germany ( in Russia - the same ),

Thats the point! It won`t! Slight problem of lack of machines.

Also, A1200 owners are the more active ones left over. You have to look
behind surveys to see how worthwhile they are.

All I can do is ask you to look at software sales figures for AGA stuff.
Then you would see the problem. Its very sad (

Alex Amsel
Silltunna Software Ltd.
"Burn Hollywood Burn...Take Down Tinsel Town" - Leftfield

 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by Jonas Thore » Wed, 31 Jul 1996 04:00:00





>> I am a Amiga games collector and am looking for the following
>> games:

>>   256 color version of King's Quest VI
>>   256 color version of Wing Commander (for AGA machine)
>Pretty sure neither of these exist, but I could be wrong.

Wasn't Wing Commander released for the CD32? Okay, that doesn't say
it actually _used_ 256 colors...

---

Skyttbacksv?gen 11   |Fidonet:  2:206/124.7        |to  wear, eat and
740 34  Skyttorp     |Voice:    +46-18-352444      | experiment on"
Sweden               |                             |- Cat*s dog
---
Be careful what you wish for, you might get it.

 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by TYMOTHY D » Thu, 01 Aug 1996 04:00:00


I did not think 256 color versions of these games really
existed. It is just that I have seen promises of them
in older catalogs, so I thought *maybe* they got released in
Europe.
  As far as the US and the Amiga, forget it. Besides a dwindling
amount of hobbiest Amiga users and Toaster owners, the AMiga is
dead here. I don't hear jack about anything Amiga unless I get
some news from overseas. And I live right in the middle of
Silicon Valley.
  Oh well, I'll keep using my Amiga.

-Tymothy DJ

 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by Skuld's Lov » Sat, 03 Aug 1996 04:00:00


In article <RbKuvxW.tymo...@delphi.com>,
TYMOTHY DJ  <tymo...@delphi.com> wrote:

>I am a Amiga games collector and am looking for the following
>games:

>  256 color version of King's Quest VI

This one doesn't exist, but it has an interesting story behind it.

In the beginning, Sierra did all of their own Amiga ports in house.
Ironically, despite what everyone SEEMS to say, they actually did a
pretty good job with them.

The early ports of their 16-color-CGA games such as Space Quest I and II,
King's Quest I and II, Leisure Suit Larry I, etc. Were all spot on. Of
course, 16-color-CGA and 3 voices of square wave audio were not that
impressive on the Amiga as even the earliest Amiga games were better than
THAT (see note about Mindwalker below).

The reason they were so "awful" is that these games were originally
developed for MS/DOS compatibles (I may be wrong, see below).
16-color-CGA was chosen because that was the best MS/DOS compatible
display system that mortals could afford back then, and sound cards were
more or less nonexistent (see note about 16-color CGA, 3-voice square
wave, the Tandy and the PCJr below).

Later, as better display devices (EGA, then VGA) and better audio systems
(AdLib, Soundblaster, MIDI boxes) for MS/DOS compatibles became
affordable, Sierra coded their games to take advantage of them.

Contrary to what many Amiga users said at the time, Sierra actually took
a great deal of interest in the Amiga, and their programmers worked hard
to try to make good Amiga versions of their products. They consistently
upgraded the Amiga interpreter to support better display modes, and they
worked to create better audio drivers so that we could actually enjoy the
music.

On the graphics front, EGA was no problem, we got it. VGA, on the other
hand, was difficult to convert as we had no 256-color displaymode back
then. So they did what they could, and dithered the graphics down to 32
colors as best as they could within the limits of their system. They
tried real hard to make it look good. Unfortunately, as I will explain
later, Sierra's Amiga programmers were by-the-book American code grinders,
who could produce well-organized and smartly-designed code, but had
difficulty grasping the fiddly tricks that were common on the Amiga. It
took them some time to figure out how to implement EHB support, a concept
that seems simple to us, and by the time they had finally got it working
upper management was moving to discontinue Amiga support. Only one
64-color port (Robin Hood) made it to release. In fact, shortly before
the end, they even attempted to bring the VGA graphics over more or less
intact by using HAM mode, but the necessary trickery to get something
like that to work without horrible fringing while still maintaining a
sane frame rate was firmly in the domain of hackers and beyond the skills
of CS-style code-theory American programmers

On the audio front, they also worked hard to give us the best that they
could. They gave us a choice of THREE audio drivers! The old 3-voice
square driver for people with slow disk access or small amounts of RAM, a
4-voice sample-based driver for most folk, *AND* a MIDI driver! To the
best of my knowledge, Sierra games are the ONLY games on the Amiga ever
to support MIDI. Admittedly, the driver was specifically for the MT-32,
so it can sound a little weird on other devices, but back then there
wasn't such a thing as General MIDI, so they tried to aim for a popular
device that sounded good. Back then people complained that the internal
Amiga sound was awful, but in reality it was pretty darn good considering
the circumstances (I'll elaborate below), and with a good MIDI device the
music was absolutely fantastic. Listening to King's Quest V on my
friend's A3000 w/Sound Canvas was exhilarating, despite the occasional
instrument mixups (usually involving sound effects, a chest closing
became a deep tuba sound, for instance).

Yet despite all of Sierra's efforts, most of the Amiga community scorned
their ports. To be certain, they had a point. Compared to European games
developed specifically for the Amiga, Sierra's offerings looked a bit
shoddy in comparison. The 32-color graphics didn't look as nice. By all
appearances they weren't optimizing their palette usage. The internal sound
sounded flat and disjointed compared to the incredible scores of the
European games. Furthermore, and this was the most common complaint, they
ran slowly on 7.14Mhz 68000 machines for apparently no good reason,
crawling somewhat even when only one object was crossing the screen.
Compared to games like Shadow of the Beast, with multiple parallax layers
and objects zooming across the screen at 50 frames per second on even the
slowest Amiga, Sierra ports looked like shoddy programming. In fact, the
programming was quite good. In order to understand why Sierra games
performed on such a relatively mediocre level, you have to understand how
the games themselves work.

Sierra games were not written in traditional computer languages, rather
they were written for an abstract graphic adventure-oriented game engine
using an interpreted language. This was done for several reasons.

Firstly, because the language was specifically designed to facilitate the
creation of graphic adventures, the actual coding of the game would be
less of a burden, and more time and effort could be spent into the actual
design of the adventure. This is the same reason why some of us prefer to
code mostly in C instead of assembly.

Second, because the language worked on a more abstract level, the bonds
of hardware restrictions were loosened, giving the creativity of the
author precedence over a given hardware configuration. While hard limits
like display system limitations still remained, the author no longer had
to constantly worry about how big his objects would have to be, etc.
Also, one only had to create one score of music, instead of one per
possible output device; the audio drivers would see that the user's
hardware made the appropriate sounds.

Third, not only could the same adventure code be used for machines with
different peripherals, it could also be used without a great deal of
modification on other platforms. In fact, outside of the color reduction
of VGA screens and the addition of samples for the Amiga's purely
sample-based audio system, there were almost no changes in the actual
adventure code that was brought over. Were it not for this ease of
conversion, the Amiga would probably not have received the plethora of
Sierra games that it did.

Now, considering how generalized Sierra's interpreters were, the amount
of work that they had to do to even move the character around the screen
was immense. Everything happened on a higher level of abstraction. So in
reality, Sierra's coding wasn't utterly slow and awful. Rather, it was
well thought out, well organized, and flexible. It ran at a quite
reasonable speed for the features that it provided. Despite appearances,
the code really had been optimized, and performed quite well next to its
MS/DOS-compatible counterpart on an equivalent processor.

Certainly, the system had its drawbacks. It meant that every display
couldn't have a 100% optimized palette, because that wouldn't leave any
flexibility for more objects that might appear onscreen. It meant that
playback on systems not designed for generalized score-based audio
information would not sound as good as MOD-style hardware-oriented music
routines. But despite these drawbacks it also meant that good games could
be made in greater numbers and for more systems than would otherwise be
possible.

Sierra's Amiga programmers weren't the fanciest in the world. They
weren't any good at assembly-level optimization. They didn't know how to
tweak 110% out of the Amiga's custom chipset. They just weren't the type.

They were, however, very good at what they did know how to do. Their
software used intuition, they knew how to properly access files, they
didn't shut down multitasking, their software almost never crashed. In other
words, their software followed the rules, and still played reasonably
well. They did their best to support the Amiga's internal audio, and went
even further and supported alternative audio devices when noone else
would. They did their best to support the Amiga's graphics system,
yielding good displays without sacrificing other parts of the game. They
mastered and supported EHB, something which most games should
have but didn't. They even worked towards using HAM (and may well have
succeeded if they'd been given the opportunity to study it more). They
not only supported but recommended hard drives in an era when most Amiga
games came on bizarre copy protected disks that left you screwed if they
ever failed.

Futhermore, because they followed the rules, their software continues to
work without the need to cripple your system. Every time I upgrade, I'm
pleased to see that the software just performs better and better. I can
chat on IRC with a fellow adventurer while I try to determine how to
rescue the Two Guys From Andromeda from their prison of lime Jell-o, or
gloat at yet another hop in the sack in Leisure Suit Larry. It likes my
copyback cache, it doesn't puke with a nonzero VBR, it doesn't grind my
floppy drives into powder, it drags, it multitasks, it mode promotes.
All that's left is to try running it under CyberGraphX or on a Draco.

The reason I wrote this admittedly long and impromptu history of software
from a company that has abandoned us in response to a simple question
that needed nothing more than a simple answer is difficult to explain.
Maybe it's because I was one of the foolish people who rashly jumped to
criticize Sierra's Amiga productions, eventually driving them out of the
market. Maybe this is just my way of apologizing to Sierra and the Amiga
community. ...

read more »

 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by Peter » Sat, 03 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Re: Sierra's Amiga games
:they actually did a pretty good job with them.

This is sheer apologist fantasy. Sierra's Amiga conversions were done by a
couple of guys with some utilties. Sierra's interest in the Amiga was
financial, rather than technical, and its apportionment of resources was
never more than modest. The early games show off well because they were
originally coded for lesser machines. When the spec for the IBM originals
began to exceed the 16-color "standard" for low-rent Amiga ports, the
quality dropped off markedly -- especially in terms of speed and color
integrity. What was good about the Sierra games is simply that they were
fun to play -- at  least until technical issues rendered them next to
unplayable.  

RE: Alternate Reality: The City
:Didn't this one use the same engine as
:Deja Vu/Uninvited/Tass Times in Tonetown?

No. (Indeed, the Deja Vu and Tass engines are themselves entirely
different, as well as being from different developers). AR: The City was
an open-ended first-person RPG -- the first of six planned games (ported
from the 8-bit world) that were to link together in a grand-scale sim: the
Dungeon, the Arena; the Palace ... etc. The City was a
character-building/map-making game designed to prepare a character for The
Dungeon. The followup was about 95-percent complete when publisher
Intellicreations (aka DataSoft) went under, and it has never shown its
face since then.  

 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by TYMOTHY D » Tue, 06 Aug 1996 04:00:00



>an open-ended first-person RPG -- the first of six planned games (ported
>from the 8-bit world) that were to link together in a grand-scale sim: the
>Dungeon, the Arena; the Palace ... etc. The City was a
>character-building/map-making game designed to prepare a character for The
>Dungeon. The followup was about 95-percent complete when publisher
>Intellicreations (aka DataSoft) went under, and it has never shown its
>face since then.  

 Actually the Dungeon did get released. I had it for my
Atari computer. Not any other though. Sniff.

Tymothy DJ

 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by Peter » Tue, 06 Aug 1996 04:00:00


:Actually the Dungeon did get released. I had it for my
:Atari computer. Not any other though.

I was referring to the Amiga conversion, which was not released. The
Dungeon came out for the C64, and I've seen reports of its appeariong on
the Atari 800.

 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by TYMOTHY D » Thu, 08 Aug 1996 04:00:00



>I was referring to the Amiga conversion, which was not released. The
>Dungeon came out for the C64, and I've seen reports of its appeariong on
>the Atari 800.

Yeah I had it for the Atari 130XE. It was pretty good to. I liked the
concept of a non-linear adventure. Most RPgs force you to go in one
way or make no progress. This one you could really do what you wanted.
Even be evil if you want. And if you joined a bad guild and then pissed
them off they would actually give you bad dreams, where you would not
rest well, until they tracked you down and tried to kill you. Finding
the shotgun, which did 200 points of damage, was fun too. I still
wish someone would take this series, or a least the concept of it
and remake it. It still would be better than these "state of the art"
RPGs that don't give a real feeling of freedom.

Tymothy DJ

P.S. By the way all that stuff about Sierra is bogus. LucasArts
did an excellent job of following the rules, and they still
made great graphic adventures that would run fine on an
unacccelerated A500. So in comparison, the Sierra programmers
were lame, in that respect. I just liked the games themselves,
but LucasArts games were better and still are. And since they
are fully American (right here in California) that kind of
blows the idea that the problem is that Sierra's problem was
that they had American programmers. Sierra is based in California
too. There are hackers in all countries that excel. LucasArts just
attracts more of them.

 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by Skuld's Lov » Thu, 08 Aug 1996 04:00:00




Quote:>P.S. By the way all that stuff about Sierra is bogus. LucasArts
>did an excellent job of following the rules, and they still
>made great graphic adventures that would run fine on an
>unacccelerated A500. So in comparison, the Sierra programmers
>were lame, in that respect.

I used to think this, until I compared Space Quest IV vs. Monkey Island
II running on an A3000 with an 040/40 w/GVP Spectrum and a Sound Canvas.

SQ IV moved at a good pace and the sound simply BLEW Monkey Island out of
the water! (I don't remember if it promoted to the Spectrum though)

-----
James Sellman -- Idaho State University           | "Lum, did you just see
--------------------------------------------------|  a * rabbit flying


 
 
 

Will pay for King's Quest VI, Wing Commander, Alternate Reality.

Post by TYMOTHY D » Sun, 11 Aug 1996 04:00:00



>I used to think this, until I compared Space Quest IV vs. Monkey Island
>II running on an A3000 with an 040/40 w/GVP Spectrum and a Sound Canvas.

>SQ IV moved at a good pace and the sound simply BLEW Monkey Island out of
>the water! (I don't remember if it promoted to the Spectrum though)

Sorry, I don't agree. I have played all the Sierra games, and I
do have an accerlerated Amiga, so they do go faster. There are two
key points that you are missing.
  1. You should not have to buy an expensive system to play a game
     and make it good. A game should cater to the standard system
     not the other way around. Space Quest IV on even a standard
     A1200 moves WAY too slow. So Lucasarts did a MUCH better job
     in this respect (How many users at the time of the release
     of these games have a system comparible to yours?)
  2. Monkey Island was simply a better game. Better story. Better
     humor. Better gameplay. More options (rather then the standard
     "four action icon" approach that I feel has "dumbed down"
     Sierra games of late.) And Monkey Island II was even better.
     Even Zak Mackracken and Maniac Mansion, with their poorer
     graphics, beat any sierra game in this respect.)
Gameplay is  #1. And Quake may look very pretty in the highest
resolution, but you need an Alpha Workstation to get to run
run at a decent speed. (Quake is a prime example of glitz
over gameplay)

Tymothy DJ

 
 
 

1. King's Quest VI Problem

Lock up problem or am I supposed to do something? This is what I ask of
myself (and now you) when it comes to the King's Quest VI and I removed
the painting from the upstairs (in the castle). I've tried changing
chipsets, running no background tasks, not doing anything for 10
minutes just to see what may happen. Nothing. What exactly happens is
that I remove the painting (getting the nail or not doesn't change the
outcome) and re-hide behind the colume. The two dog guards walk up and
mention that the painting has fallen. I left click the text box away
and the one guard dog just behind the lead one takes two steps and
*BLAM*! I figured it might me my accellator board so instead of going
upstairs I want back out side and walked around, talked to people, and
after 10 to 15 minutes returned to the castle and the program hung
exactly in the same place. Any ideas?
                                                        Doug

 * Q-Blue 2.0 *  Howard Stern: King Of All Media

2. Shellplay

3. King's Quest VI Help

4. WHY IS WINDOWS SHOWING IRC9 ON ALL MY DEVICES???

5. King's Quest VI Help?

6. XSL in Selectnodes

7. King's Quest VI

8. King's Quest VI...Help!

9. ng Commander,Alternate Reality

10. does anyone know where I can download King's Quest and Space Quest games?

11. Space Quest 4 and King's Quest 5: Worth puttin down money for?