gimp newbie

gimp newbie

Post by ***Fintan** » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 20:30:16



I don't use gimp or any graphics programs
but what i like about linux you only use what you want to use
anyway i am after a program to compress photo's as i am still on dial up
and its good practice to compress photo if i am sending it via email

does gimp compress photo's with one click?
if not can anyone show me best way to compress my photos using gimp as its
already installed into my machine

i am using redhat 8

fintan

 
 
 

gimp newbie

Post by Dave Near » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 21:06:35


On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 12:30:16 +0100, ***Fintan*** said:

Quote:> I don't use gimp or any graphics programs
> but what i like about linux you only use what you want to use
> anyway i am after a program to compress photo's as i am still on dial up
> and its good practice to compress photo if i am sending it via email

If all you want to do is compress photos, then there may be
better tools available, but you can do that with the gimp.

Also, if you're sending photos by email, it might also be an idea
to reduce their size as well as increase their compression.

Quote:> does gimp compress photo's with one click?
> if not can anyone show me best way to compress my photos using gimp as its
> already installed into my machine

Open your photo, and then right-click in the image, and select
File->Save As. If you're using gimp 1.3, you can select this from
the drop-down menus as well.

Enter the filename you want to call your compressed photo
(photo.jpeg, for example). For photos, you should probably use
the jpeg format. The "Save as JPEG" dialog will pop up, offering
you lots of options - the one you're interested in is the
"Quality" slider. The lower the quality, the smaller the image.
The size of the saved image is also in the dialog.

Note that the lower you put this slider, the worse the image is.
They don't label it "quality" for nothing. If you can't get to
the size you are looking for when using the slider, consider
making the image smaller (I find that for e-mails, 800x600 is
fine, and you can get images down to 30-50K, which is more than
acceptable) - to scale your photos, right click in the image, and
go to Image->Scale image, select a smallish size (600x450 or
800x600), and then follow the steps above to save as a jpeg.

Cheers,
Dave.

--
                David Neary,
        E-Mail: bolsh at gimp dot org
   Work e-mail: d dot neary at phenix dot fr
CV: http://www.redbrick.dcu.ie/~bolsh/CV/CV.html

 
 
 

gimp newbie

Post by ***Fintan** » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 21:30:40



> On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 12:30:16 +0100, ***Fintan*** said:
>> I don't use gimp or any graphics programs
>> but what i like about linux you only use what you want to use
>> anyway i am after a program to compress photo's as i am still on dial up
>> and its good practice to compress photo if i am sending it via email

<snipped>

Thanks Dave
couldn't belive how easy it is using gimp
brilliant

just couldn't bring my self to wade through loads on manuals just to do
one thing

so thanks for your help :-)

fintan

 
 
 

gimp newbie

Post by William Kendri » Thu, 26 Jun 2003 00:07:02



> does gimp compress photo's with one click?

Well... Err...  Right-Click, File, Save-As. :^)  So three clicks.
(Or bind 'Save As' to a key combo, like Sh+Ct+S)

Quote:> if not can anyone show me best way to compress my photos using gimp as its
> already installed into my machine

> i am using redhat 8

It really depends on what kind of files you're talking about.
I'll assume you're talking JPEG, and if so, then yes; it's got a little
"Quality" gauge you can alter when saving a JPEG file.

You may also want to look into either ImageMagick or NetPBM
(err, rather "cjpeg"/"djpeg"), as they should let you "load and re-save"
a JPEG file with higher compression (aka lower quality).

For example, using the cjpeg and djpeg tools:

  djpeg IN.jpg | cjpeg -quality 50 > OUT.jpg

You could write a batch file that does this quality-reduction to your
entire collection of photos.

Note: Since JPEG is a lossy format, loading the JPEG up and then resaving it
will introduce extra "noise."  (If you were to load and resave one over and
over again, it'd degenerate, like an Nth generation videotape copy!)

If you have originals of your photos in either some non-lossy format
(PNG, TIFF, TGA, etc.) or a larger resolution (e.g., 1600x1200 JPEG off
of your digital camera, but you're saving 400x300 images for the web),
you'd probably want to redo the conversion and/or size reduction, and
set the compression level when creating the final JPEG.

For example, with NetPBM tools:

  tifftopnm IN.tiff | pnmscale .25 | cjpeg -quality 50 > OUT.jpg

... to convert an original, huge TIFF, reduce it down to 1/16th size,
and save it out as a 50% quality JPEG.

This is much better than:

  tifftopnm IN.tiff | pnmscale .25 | cjpeg > FIRST.jpg

... then later on:

  djpeg FIRST.jpg | cjpeg -quality 50 > SECOND.jpg

Because even though you didn't alter the quality settings when creating
FIRST.jpg, there are already artifacts there that will only be made worse
when re-JPEG'ing it into SECOND.jpg.  It's just how the JPEG format works! :^)

Wow, have I rambled on enough?

-bill!
(running on 0 sleep ;^) )

--

http://newbreedsoftware.com/bill/       http://newbreedsoftware.com/tuxpaint/

 
 
 

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