Digital Global Roaming

Digital Global Roaming

Post by CAMERON.J.ATK.. » Tue, 02 Jan 1996 04:00:00





>>> Do I have any hope of use that phone is the USA?
>> No.  I don't think GSM is used at all over there.  Some companies use a
>> digital variant of the Analogue system, which doesn't help you.
> Well, you might be able to use your SIM in the Washington DC area.  A
> Sprint (and someone else) venture just launched PCS1900 service.
> PCS1900 is basically GSM at 1900Mhz (there are some "americanization"
> aspects such as equal access for long distance).  But, you will NOT be
> able to use your phone from Australia.

There are no commercial arrangements between any of the Australian
carriers (Telstra, Optus, Vodafone) to support roaming (whether your
own SIM or a "SIM swap") into the US if you have a digital mobile
service.  Technically it may be possible, but it is usually the
abilities of Telco's billing systems to exchange CDRs and the agreed
tariffing that are the challenges that present themselves.

Quote:>>> Could anyone enlighten me as to potential problems?
>> When you get back, you might have to pay an arm and a leg through the nose
>> for approval to use a foreign phone in Australia.
> That's kind of protectionist, isn't it?  I mean, all you should have
> to do is pay any import duties and you should be done.  As far as
> getting service with Telstra or OPTUS, you should be able to plug your
> SIM (that is registered in a local network) into your phone ... and you
> should be done.  However, I've heard that the voice encryption (A5
> algorythm (sp?)) used in Europe was blocked in Australia.  And, that
> a "substitute" encryption method was employed instead.  Anybody know
> the details?

Any telco equipment in Australia must be approved by Austel (Aust.
Telecomm.  Authority) before it should be used.  By virtue of the way
GSM phones operate, this is difficult to police though as a rule of
thumb you will not get into trouble if you simply purchase a GSM phone
overseas that is already marketed within Australia (e.g. Nokia 2110,
Ericcson 337, Motorola 8200)- if you believe you may want to sell the
phone in the future it is prudent to get the necessary certification
that endorses the phone by Austel.  To get this you simply approach
the local office of any of the phone distributors.  This may cost you
A$25 thereabouts.

However, if you buy a GSM phone o/s (It is bound to be cheaper), you
simply plug your local SIM in.

A5 is used in Australia.  Some developing countries (Am unsure exactly
who and do not wish to guess) are prevented from using it due to
perceived concerns of providing it where the threat of having it
applied for dubious means is a risk.  We're a friendly bunch down
here!

Quote:> The GSM networks in Australia generally wouldn't know where the phone
> was purchased (or manufactured).  Really, all they care about is
> whether or not your IMSI (International Mobile Subscriber Identity)
> and IMEI (International Mobile Equipment Identity) numbers are valid
> in it's network.

The telcos don't log the IMSI or IMEI at present.

The telcos are individually (I know Voda and Optus are for certain)
constructing IMSI and IMEI databases that will enable them to validate
and track customer phones.  The application of this will be similar to
what is applied on the AMPS network whereby the ESN is logged on the
network customer care/billing system - (i) for the purpose of
registering valid local phones and (ii) "locking" out the activation
of stolen or lost phones.  The ease of re-using GSM phones at present
when lost or stolen has been the obvious trigger for such databases.

If you want more information, please contact me directly.

Regards,

Cameron Atkins

 
 
 

1. Digital Global Roaming

Well, you might be able to use your SIM in the Washington DC area.  A
Sprint (and someone else) venture just launched PCS1900 service.
PCS1900 is basically GSM at 1900Mhz (there are some "americanization"
aspects such as equal access for long distance).  But, you will NOT be
able to use your phone from Australia.

That's kind of protectionist, isn't it?  I mean, all you should have
to do is pay any import duties and you should be done.  As far as
getting service with Telstra or OPTUS, you should be able to plug your
SIM (that is registered in a local network) into your phone ... and you
should be done.  However, I've heard that the voice encryption (A5
algorythm (sp?)) used in Europe was blocked in Australia.  And, that
a "substitute" encryption method was employed instead.  Anybody know
the details?

The GSM networks in Australia generally wouldn't know where the phone
was purchased (or manufactured).  Really, all they care about is
whether or not your IMSI (International Mobile Subscriber Identity)
and IMEI (International Mobile Equipment Identity) numbers are valid
in it's network.

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