Water in the wall field

Water in the wall field

Post by Lorence Mlodzins » Mon, 30 Jan 1995 06:59:57




Quote:>We recently had our 110 wall field get wet from a pipe leak. The
>water in the pipe contained a borax and alaklai solution for some
>purposes or another. The wall field has some major corrosion problems
>and we are back online. We will be replacing the entire field but are
>wondering if anyone else has experienced this situation and how much
>of a problem they had with corrosion. We would like to take the time
>to redesign the room and upgrade to CAT 5 hardware, but don't want
>to risk further disruptions due to continued corrosion.
>Has anyone dealt with this problem before and want to share how
>fast their cable plant went to hell in a hand basket.

The field is history. I've seen fields hit by tap water turn green.
We had a minor disaster a number of years ago when a sprinkler pipe
broke above a riser at the top of an office building. It was on a weekend
and no one realized what had happened untill the main floor got wet.
We dried everythig out as fast as possible (fans, dessicat, sprays etc).
Once the fields dried out things seemed fine but as time passed we had
nothing but trouble ie. high resistance grounds, intermittant opens etc.
One thing I found was that no matter how well you dry things up, water
soakes into every little crack, and stays there for weeks. It gets into the
spaces between the plastic body of a teminal strip and the metal connector.
Spray it with any type of cleaner you want, once the water gets in, nothing
gets it out untill it dries by itself.
CAT 5 will not let you get away with anything, Just a few transpositions
out of a pair will effect transmission, can you imagine a field full of
grounds and short circuits, not fun but good for overtime.
 
 
 

1. WATER IN THE WALL FIELD


MJ>water in the pipe contained a borax and alaklai solution for some
MJ>purposes or another. The wall field has some major corrosion problems
MJ>and we are back online. We will be replacing the entire field but are
MJ>wondering if anyone else has experienced this situation and how much
MJ>of a problem they had with corrosion. We would like to take the time
MJ>to redesign the room and upgrade to CAT 5 hardware, but don't want
MJ>to risk further disruptions due to continued corrosion.

 Fixed a fair number of wet cross-connects.. it *can* get ugly in a hurry.

 Although I'm not familiar with a "110" connection, I'd assume it's just a
punch-on dry connector.  You've already fixed up the "moisture" problem,
now it's a question of time <g>.  Actually, if you were to spray the
entire field with good contact cleaner, it should help extend the
corrosion time.

 The "good" connections will last quite a while (depending on how fast you
got rid of the dampness, and *God knows what the heck the chem solution
will do*) , but the poor ones will develope partial opens in a hurry.

 Once this happens, naturally someone will go down and start trying to
fix-up the bad line(s).  This is when it can get funny, as each time you
fix one or two, another couple will go "open".

 BTW, pay attention to the routing of the sheathed cables.. the solution
probably worked it's way down a few of those.  They need to be cut back to
the dry areas and new "legs" added.  Water laying within a cable sheath
will do funny things to capacitance, and over a long course of time will
migrate through into the pairs and cause more corrosion.


Murillo/Thunder Bay, Ontario.
~~~
 * VbReader 2.2 #94 * May you live in interesting times.

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