Caller-ID and NT-specific Caller-ID?

Caller-ID and NT-specific Caller-ID?

Post by Chris Piraz » Fri, 28 Apr 1995 04:00:00



We have a Northern Telecom SL100 switch at our company.  Certain
phones (such as Meridian 2616) have a display on which the caller's
name and number are displayed for any incoming or outgoing call.

I have noticed that when we place a call to or receive a call from a
number OUTSIDE of our company, and the phone at that number is also
being served by an SL100 (or DMS100), the distant caller ALSO
sees my name and number, and I see the distant caller's name and
number.

I recently noticed this when a friend of mine at our company called a
hotel which happened to have a DMS100.  When the hotel operator
transferred him "anonymously" to certain room, the hotel guest's name
and room number popped up on his display phone!  Nice security.

I only barely understand what is going on here and I'd like to
know more.

Specifically,

1. I can understand how a distant phone user might get my phone
number, via the standard Caller-ID signaling mechanism.  But is the
additional information (the string including my name and my extension)
also transferred to all phones as part of the standard Caller-ID
signalling mechanism, or is this indeed part of some Northern Telecom-
specific protocol that somehow piggybacks its way over the public net?

2. Regardless of the answer to #1, can someone point me to a spec
describing the signals used for Caller-ID (I understand they are
wedged between the first and second ring in a call) ?  I'd like
to understand exactly what kind of information is carried by
this protocol and how.

3. If the additional information from #1 is carried in an NT-specific
signal, can someone point me to a spec for the NT-specific signal?

4. Can someone explain exactly what the deal is with Caller-ID and
California?  What forms of Caller-ID are allowed and what aren't?
What are the restrictions on calls that are CA-to-CA, CA-to-outside,
and outside-to-CA ?  If this is an FAQ item please lead me to the
right place.

5. If the additional information from #1 is carried in an NT-specific
signal, is that signal also subject to the same legal constraints in
California as "standard" Caller-ID information?

thanks,

        - Chris Pirazzi

 
 
 

Caller-ID and NT-specific Caller-ID?

Post by Jay Ashwor » Thu, 04 May 1995 04:00:00



Quote:>Bellcore Technical Reference  TR-TSY-000030 Issue 1, November 1988,
>entitled "SPCS Customer Premises Equipment Data Interface"
>Bellcore Technical Reference  TR-TSY-000031 Issue 3, January 1990,
>entitled "CLASS(sm) Feature: Calling Number Display"

Yeah... but just remember how much trouble these 2 documents got Len Rose
in...

Cheers,
-- jra
--
Jay R. Ashworth       High Technology Systems Consulting              Ashworth
Designer             Linux: The Choice of a GNU Generation        & Associates
ka1fjx/4    "I minored in babbling in college... and got       +1 813 790 7592


 
 
 

1. Caller-ID and NT-Specific Caller-ID?

We have a Northern Telecom SL100 switch at our company.  Certain
phones (such as Meridian 2616) have a display on which the caller's
name and number are displayed for any incoming or outgoing call.

I have noticed that when we place a call to or receive a call from a
number OUTSIDE of our company, and the phone at that number is also
being served by an SL100 (or DMS100), the distant caller ALSO
sees my name and number, and I see the distant caller's name and
number.

I recently noticed this when a friend of mine at our company called a
hotel which happened to have a DMS100.  When the hotel operator
transferred him "anonymously" to a certain room, the hotel guest's name
and room number popped up on his display phone!  Nice security.

I only barely understand what is going on here and I'd like to
know more.

Specifically,

1. I can understand how a distant phone user might get my phone
number, via the standard Caller-ID signaling mechanism.  But is the
additional information (the string including my name and my extension)
also transferred to all phones as part of the standard Caller-ID
signalling mechanism, or is this indeed part of some Northern Telecom-
specific protocol that somehow piggybacks its way over the public net?

2. Regardless of the answer to #1, can someone point me to a spec
describing the signals used for Caller-ID (I understand they are
wedged between the first and second ring in a call) ?  I'd like
to understand exactly what kind of information is carried by
this protocol and how.

3. If the additional information from #1 is carried in an NT-specific
signal, can someone point me to a spec for the NT-specific signal?

4. Can someone explain exactly what the deal is with Caller-ID and
California?  What forms of Caller-ID are allowed and what aren't?
What are the restrictions on calls that are CA-to-CA, CA-to-outside,
and outside-to-CA ?  If this is an FAQ item please lead me to the
right place.

5. If the additional information from #1 is carried in an NT-specific
signal, is that signal also subject to the same legal constraints in
California as "standard" Caller-ID information?

Thanks,

Chris Pirazzi

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