Dialing "Blocked" US 1-800, 888, 877 Numbers from Canada

Dialing "Blocked" US 1-800, 888, 877 Numbers from Canada

Post by Louis Rapha » Fri, 20 Aug 1999 04:00:00



Some of the long-distance companies (I forget which, but call around --
you'll probably get the most luck with the medium-size outfits /
resellers) offer a service whereby you pay a fee per minute "to the
border" and they allow you to call US 800 numbers. Totally legal,
although not necessarily cheap.

Louis

 
 
 

Dialing "Blocked" US 1-800, 888, 877 Numbers from Canada

Post by Steve Wint » Fri, 20 Aug 1999 04:00:00



Quote:> Many US 1-800, 888, and 877 toll free numbers appear to be "blocked"
> from being accessed from within Canada.

It is not so much that they are "blocked" as that they are international
calls and the per minute rate makes it forbiddingly expensive.

You are talking international 800 rates here.

Steve

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Dialing "Blocked" US 1-800, 888, 877 Numbers from Canada

Post by John McHar » Sat, 21 Aug 1999 04:00:00


On Wed, 18 Aug 1999 22:40:00 -0400, Judith Oppenheimer


> However, these companies do have local numbers as well, without which
> there'd be no 'ring-to' number to designate pointing the toll free
> number to.

800 numbers with significant volume are generally connected directly
to the long distance carrier.  They have no NANPA number.  Of course
the companies do, but those numbers don't generally go to the same
places as the 800 numbers, which can have time of day and point of
origin routing.  Smaller volume 800 numbers tend to behave as you
describe.

Quote:> [TELECOM Digest Editor's Note: Judith, I am wondering if there are
> any longer the type of 800 number which was on a dedicated wire
> pair of its own with no 'ring to' number attached. Do you recall
> the kind I mean? Years ago, you could go into an office and see a
> phone that was the actual 800 line termination itself. It would be
> a one-way incoming line (battery, but no dial tone if you lifted
> the receiver when no call was present). The number plate on the
> phone would even identify it as 800-xxx-xxxx. Usually there was no
> dial or touch-tone pad on the phone; it looked like a manual
> instrument.  Next question: is there such a thing as 'banded in-Wats'
> any longer, as far as pricing is concerned?

For significant volume, rates are pretty negotiable.  I wouldn't be
surprised if there is some sort of banded pricing in effect, but I am
not aware of any.

Quote:> Finally, is there such a thing as outgoing wats service any longer,
> or has the price for long distance calls in general been reduced to
> the point that no one cares about purchasing X hours of time per month
> as could be done in the old days?  Judith or anyone else is welcome to
> answer.  PAT]

Again, for enough volume, everything is negotiable.  I seem to recall
that in Canada there is even an unmetered evening service for
consumers.  This is about the same as outwats.  It would surprise me
if nobody was offering businesses flat rate calling in the US for
dedicated access.  It isn't too hard to calculate how many minutes
this amounts to.
 
 
 

Dialing "Blocked" US 1-800, 888, 877 Numbers from Canada

Post by Michael A. Desmo » Sat, 21 Aug 1999 04:00:00


In TELECOM Digest article "Dialing 'Blocked' US 1-800, 888, 877

Quote:> Toll free numbers can be designated U.S. & Canada accessible,
> U.S. only, or accessible by only one (or more) area code,
> depending on the wishes (generally based on the marketing area)
> of the subscriber.
> However, these companies do have local numbers as well, without
> which there'd be no 'ring-to' number to designate pointing the
> toll free number to.

Having worked in network operations in switching and translations, I
can tell you that not all toll free numbers have local numbers.  They
can be pointed from the carrier switch to the customer PBX over a
dedicated T-1.  We could add a local number in the translations in
case the T-1 went down, or for time and day routing however.  Most
customers opted for this.
 
 
 

Dialing "Blocked" US 1-800, 888, 877 Numbers from Canada

Post by Steven J Sob » Sun, 22 Aug 1999 04:00:00



Quote:> Having worked in network operations in switching and translations, I
> can tell you that not all toll free numbers have local numbers.  They
> can be pointed from the carrier switch to the customer PBX over a
> dedicated T-1.  We could add a local number in the translations in
> case the T-1 went down, or for time and day routing however.  Most
> customers opted for this.

Hey Mike! :)

So how come AT&T got so flustered when I asked them to forward calls
to my toll free numbers to my pager?

I did so because at the time, I didn't have an office phone.

The pager had a regular, local phone number associated with it.

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Dialing "Blocked" US 1-800, 888, 877 Numbers from Canada

Post by Al Ivers » Sun, 22 Aug 1999 04:00:00





>> Having worked in network operations in switching and translations, I
>> can tell you that not all toll free numbers have local numbers.  They
>> can be pointed from the carrier switch to the customer PBX over a
>> dedicated T-1.  We could add a local number in the translations in
>> case the T-1 went down, or for time and day routing however.  Most
>> customers opted for this.
> Hey Mike! :)
> So how come AT&T got so flustered when I asked them to forward calls
> to my toll free numbers to my pager?
> I did so because at the time, I didn't have an office phone.
> The pager had a regular, local phone number associated with it.

Probably because the AT&T rep was stupid, or they have some dumb anti-
pager drug dealer related policy about it.

The two 800 numbers at my work (Minnesota) just point to two different
normal local (USWest) telephone numbers. Our LD carrier is MCI Worldcom.

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Dialing "Blocked" US 1-800, 888, 877 Numbers from Canada

Post by Michael A. Desmo » Sun, 22 Aug 1999 04:00:00




> So how come AT&T got so flustered when I asked them to forward calls
> to my toll free numbers to my pager?
> I did so because at the time, I didn't have an office phone.
> The pager had a regular, local phone number associated with it.

There's no technical reason why they couldn't.  AT&T is just being
difficult.  They can point an 800 number just about anywhere.  We had
situations where a customer would point their 800 number to their
office during the day, and then after 5pm point it to the number of
their answering service or other alternate number.  We did that thru
translations on our Siemens DCO.  We would also get requests for
people that were going out of town on vacation or business and needed
their 800 number forwarded to the number they were going to be at.  If
there's one thing AT&T is good at, it's screwing up my AT&T Wireless
bill just about every month.  They seem to have perfected that.  :)