CorelDRAW or Illustrator

CorelDRAW or Illustrator

Post by a » Thu, 12 Jun 2003 04:42:38



Which package is easiest to use CorelDRAW or Illustrator?
 
 
 

CorelDRAW or Illustrator

Post by LLutt » Thu, 12 Jun 2003 05:50:45


Quote:>Which package is easiest to use CorelDRAW or Illustrator?

CorelDraw is the easiest to use, so I'm told. I think you'll find most home
users like CorelDraw, but pro's like Illustrator because it belongs to the
Adobe family, like Photoshop, and most print shops prefer working with
Illustrator files. CorelDraw works fine with your inkjet printer. I've not used
Illustrator, so I'm going by what others have said on this topic.
Lynn

 
 
 

CorelDRAW or Illustrator

Post by Hunter Elliot » Thu, 12 Jun 2003 06:34:37



Quote:> Which package is easiest to use CorelDRAW or Illustrator?

That depends on you, actually. Some love Draw and hate Illustrator and some
hate Draw and love Illustrator. Each does basically the same job. Both apps
can create beautiful things if the user is a) familiar with the program, b)
familiar with how to setup the files properly for the service bureau, and c)
has the skill/talent needed. Likewise, both apps can create *if you're
not familiar with the app, have little skill, and don't have a clue as to
how to create proper files for the SB.

You can d/l a demo of Draw from Corel's site - why not try it and see if you
like it?

 
 
 

CorelDRAW or Illustrator

Post by Leanda5 » Thu, 12 Jun 2003 09:46:00


If you're going to decide between the two, go with Illustrator.  CorelDraw, I
fear, after all the versions, is doomed.  
Do some corporate business research on Corel.
 
 
 

CorelDRAW or Illustrator

Post by JunkMonke » Thu, 12 Jun 2003 10:16:52


Man! Do I Ever disagree!  Just like WordPerfect and Wordstar before it, Just
like Lotus and along with all the products Microsoft has bought rather than
developed (Visio, FrontPage, SQLServer, and to some extent, Windows itself),
Corel's flagship products are more than capable of surviving with or without
Corel.

CorelDraw and the Graphics Suite has name recognition and a sizable and
LOYAL user base.  This would make an excellent base for a well heeled
software company with an interest in a broad spectrum of end user software,
or an interest in weakening the Adobe graphics hegemony - say, in Redmond
Washington, or Armonk NY to become a major graphics player.  Can you imagine
what a well financed marketing push for the Graphics Suite could do to Adobe
particularly if it could be integrated with FrontPage,  Powerpoint, and MS
Word?

Now the Wordperfect Office Suite may not fare so well, even though it also
has Sizable name recognition and a large loyal user base - particularly in
the legal community.  Microsoft and IBM already offer competing office
suites and the US Government may not allow them to buy WP anyway.  But it
could be quite a steal for a smaller company.

We haven't even discussed a Corel merger with a third company, which is also
likely.


Quote:> If you're going to decide between the two, go with Illustrator.
CorelDraw, I
> fear, after all the versions, is doomed.
> Do some corporate business research on Corel.

 
 
 

CorelDRAW or Illustrator

Post by Torben Ansch » Sat, 14 Jun 2003 04:24:52


Hi

Quote:>Which package is easiest to use CorelDRAW or Illustrator?

On the first impression, I think Corel seems to be easier. But it's not really
easy for the things you ought to do with it are not easy by themselves. And
that's why so many "stupid" Corel users produce Documents that cause imaging
and printing problems.
For example, it's easy to find out how to write text on a corne of a page. And
it's easy to find how to make circle text. It's also "easy" to set Text
justified by pressing the corresponding knob. But it's not easy to get real
good justified Text. Because then you have to go through several menus. And you
must not use graphic text. So, when it comes to real working Corel might get
harder to understand than it seems first.
But also then it's a very effective instrument for a lot of topics. You can set
how it reacts in many kinds for your own.

Illustrator does not seem easy at all - to my opinion. When you're used to
Photoshop and Indesign it might be easier. But it is the program for making
illustrations and vector graphics. That is not a very simple theme. To me
Illustrator seemed to be more complicate than Photoshop and Indesign. It's also
a very good program but I think the two programs are not so good to compare.
Corel Draw is something like a publishing program for graphic workers. It can
do Sketches but it also handles bitmaps, text and more than one pages. And it
has a great variety of effects that are quick to use like dropping shadows,
text on path, lenses, Extrusions, Transparency and many more.
I use it mostly for advertisments in Newspapers for it gives what most of the
customers want to have in adverti*ts very quick. And it's very safe - if
you know it  - when it comes to image settings.

Illustrator is not so well equipped with effects. But it concentrates on all
the things you need to have to create your own designs. The Vector instruments
are much more complex the ways to work with paths are more detailed.

It's really the point what you want to do.

Torben
Moege der Inhalt wichtiger sein als die Form

 
 
 

CorelDRAW or Illustrator

Post by Torben Ansch » Sat, 14 Jun 2003 04:31:42


Hi

Quote:>Some love Draw and hate Illustrator and some
>hate Draw and love Illustrator.

Right.

Quote:>Each does basically the same job.

No!
I think the programs have different focusses as I told in my posting. The
Program that closes the lack, is something in between is the new Freehand MX.
It copied a lot of typical Corel functions, works with internet graphics and
can have more than one page. And it has similar Vectorgraphic possiblities like
Illustrator. But it can't interprete EPS-Files directly. When you need that, go
for Illustrator or Corel.

Quote:>Both apps
>can create beautiful things if the user is a) familiar with the program, b)
>familiar with how to setup the files properly for the service bureau, and c)
>has the skill/talent needed.

Absolutely right. But to me it seems, more corel users THINK they have skills
and haven't it for real. So I get much more corel files that are shit. Mostly,
Illustrator users know more about publishing. But that does not say, that you
can't work professional with corel, I do!

Moege der Inhalt wichtiger sein als die Form

 
 
 

CorelDRAW or Illustrator

Post by Hunter Elliot » Sat, 14 Jun 2003 05:28:37



Quote:> >Each does basically the same job.

> No!
> I think the programs have different focusses as I told in my posting.

Well, it was hard to decipher what you were saying - I think something got
lost in translation to English. Yes, the 2 apps do basically the same thing.
They're both vector editing apps.

The

Quote:> Program that closes the lack, is something in between is the new Freehand

MX.

??? I don't understand what you're trying to say here, but FHMX... I have
it, but do not like it at all.

Quote:> Absolutely right. But to me it seems, more corel users THINK they have
skills
> and haven't it for real. So I get much more corel files that are shit.
Mostly,
> Illustrator users know more about publishing. But that does not say, that
you
> can't work professional with corel, I do!

I'd say the same about a lot of Illustrator users. They think just because
they use AI or PS that it's perfect when they've not setup the files well at
all. This comes down to knowledge and experience on the part of the end
user.
 
 
 

CorelDRAW or Illustrator

Post by Adhesive Label » Thu, 17 Jul 2003 10:14:52


Well,
You have to say that the reason you get more shit Corel files than
Illustrator
files is the way that Adobe and Macromedia (amongst others) have made
a point of making sure that their software packages are the leading packages
taught
in various schools of graphic arts around the world. Much in the same way
that Heidelberg printing presses have an over representation of their
equipment
in the varoius schools of printing. It's not a * theory, but a fact
that
what you learn with, and learn on is what you are likely to stay with, and
those
giants of the whole graphic arts industry know very well that teaching their
products
at a young age will ensure a lifetime of committment to them. Our local
school of graphic
arts (unofficially known as the Heidelberg school of printing) is Adobe,
Macromedia & Mac.
When the students their own buy software & computers what do think they are
going buy?


Quote:> Hi

> >Some love Draw and hate Illustrator and some
> >hate Draw and love Illustrator.

> Right.

> >Each does basically the same job.

> No!
> I think the programs have different focusses as I told in my posting. The
> Program that closes the lack, is something in between is the new Freehand
MX.
> It copied a lot of typical Corel functions, works with internet graphics
and
> can have more than one page. And it has similar Vectorgraphic possiblities
like
> Illustrator. But it can't interprete EPS-Files directly. When you need
that, go
> for Illustrator or Corel.

> >Both apps
> >can create beautiful things if the user is a) familiar with the program,
b)
> >familiar with how to setup the files properly for the service bureau, and
c)
> >has the skill/talent needed.

> Absolutely right. But to me it seems, more corel users THINK they have
skills
> and haven't it for real. So I get much more corel files that are shit.
Mostly,
> Illustrator users know more about publishing. But that does not say, that
you
> can't work professional with corel, I do!

> Moege der Inhalt wichtiger sein als die Form

 
 
 

CorelDRAW or Illustrator

Post by Kenneth Rylan » Thu, 17 Jul 2003 21:27:28


Just a theory, but I think that since Illustrator is much harder to
learn--especially when it comes to creating art that goes to press--much of
the good quality stuff that comes in AI format is done by expert users, true
artists. In the case of CorelDraw, since the tools in CD are much easier to
use for the average person, many may have the illusion that their work is
"press ready," when, in actual fact, they really don't know anything about
critical issues like color and font management. I guess my point is that
many less-qualified users are able to use CD and think they are artists
because it is easier to use.

The above is why I think Corel should really concentrate on the business
graphics market. CD is easy to use, and the market is wide open. AI will
never fit into that market because the product is too difficult to use for
the average business publications group that has to "get something out in a
hurry."

Ken Ryland


> Well,
> You have to say that the reason you get more shit Corel files than
> Illustrator
> files is the way that Adobe and Macromedia (amongst others) have made
> a point of making sure that their software packages are the leading
packages
> taught
> in various schools of graphic arts around the world. Much in the same way
> that Heidelberg printing presses have an over representation of their
> equipment
> in the varoius schools of printing. It's not a * theory, but a
fact
> that
> what you learn with, and learn on is what you are likely to stay with, and
> those
> giants of the whole graphic arts industry know very well that teaching
their
> products
> at a young age will ensure a lifetime of committment to them. Our local
> school of graphic
> arts (unofficially known as the Heidelberg school of printing) is Adobe,
> Macromedia & Mac.
> When the students their own buy software & computers what do think they
are
> going buy?



> > Hi

> > >Some love Draw and hate Illustrator and some
> > >hate Draw and love Illustrator.

> > Right.

> > >Each does basically the same job.

> > No!
> > I think the programs have different focusses as I told in my posting.
The
> > Program that closes the lack, is something in between is the new
Freehand
> MX.
> > It copied a lot of typical Corel functions, works with internet graphics
> and
> > can have more than one page. And it has similar Vectorgraphic
possiblities
> like
> > Illustrator. But it can't interprete EPS-Files directly. When you need
> that, go
> > for Illustrator or Corel.

> > >Both apps
> > >can create beautiful things if the user is a) familiar with the
program,
> b)
> > >familiar with how to setup the files properly for the service bureau,
and
> c)
> > >has the skill/talent needed.

> > Absolutely right. But to me it seems, more corel users THINK they have
> skills
> > and haven't it for real. So I get much more corel files that are shit.
> Mostly,
> > Illustrator users know more about publishing. But that does not say,
that
> you
> > can't work professional with corel, I do!

> > Moege der Inhalt wichtiger sein als die Form

 
 
 

CorelDRAW or Illustrator

Post by Torben Ansch » Fri, 18 Jul 2003 04:35:19


That's what I wanted to say.

Torben

Moege der Inhalt wichtiger sein als die Form

 
 
 

CorelDRAW or Illustrator

Post by Krok » Wed, 30 Jul 2003 21:28:06



Quote:>> In the case of CorelDraw, since the tools in CD are much easier to

use for the average person, many may have the illusion that their work is
"press ready," when, in actual fact, they really don't know anything about
critical issues like color and font management.

OK But whot if we know how to hendel critical issues like color and font
management. ??
Then Corel becomes more powerfull toll then all the others.

 
 
 

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Reply to me personally if you can.


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