Image Size Required

Image Size Required

Post by NUG-I » Sat, 07 Jun 2003 20:28:08



The answer we received to a prior question (shown below), is not what we are
looking for. Although, it might be the only answer.

The sample below is 2 megs, and we need to reduce the size if possible.
We get high res TIFF images from everyone for insertion in the magazine.

1. Would InDesign give us more flexibility?

2. How should we scale the original images so they are not so large in the
final document?

3. Are we mistaken and Pagemaker handles this automatically?

Thxs: Phil

Greetings --


Quote:> We publish an eMagazine on telecommunications that is created in PageMaker
> 7.0 and Acrobat 5.0

> The eMagazine can be viewed at:
> www.nug-it.org/sample

> How should we reduce the size of the PDF file so that it can be viewed or
> printed (black & white or color) with a lower resolution and still
maintain
> quality.

> Thxs: Phil

The only way I have found to make this work completely acceptably is to
provide a link to a 300dpi version (one PDF per page), with a caution that
downloads will be slow.

Peggy

 
 
 

Image Size Required

Post by Dick Marguli » Sun, 08 Jun 2003 06:57:59


Phil,

You need the high-res TIFFs for printing but not for viewing on the Web.
It is easy enough to produce a lower-resolution PDF for viewing on the
Web, but if the user wants to download a PDF for printing, they will
need access to one with higher-resolution images. I think what Peggy was
suggesting is that you provide a link (with a suitable warning about
file size) for those individuals who want the high-res version.

However, for them to print on a desktop printer, they do not need as
high a resolution as your offset printing company might want from you
(assuming you get the magazine printed as well as providing it
electronically, which may not be what you are doing).

You have a couple of choices here.

The first thing you want to do is open the images in Photoshop and
reduce them to the resolution you need (most people say 200 dpi is
plenty for laser printing) at the exact size you want them in the
publication. Then place them, in PageMaker, at 100% size. Yes, you can
rescale them in PageMaker, but this does not solve your file size
problem. (If you do rescale in PM, hold down both the shift and ctrl
keys. This forces the image to scale to only those percentages that will
print satisfactorily on your target printer.)

Here is where your two options diverge:

Option 1.

Keep your PageMaker file in the same flat directory with all of your
resized image files. Copy the entire directory and save it under a
different name ("lo-res," for example). Open all of the images in the
lo-res directory in Photoshop. Resave them at 72 dpi, but the same image
size. Open the copy of your PageMaker file. If the stars are properly
aligned, everything will link properly to the lower-resolution images.
Make two PDFs, one from each PM file, and label them for their
respective purposes.

Option 2.

Just make one PageMaker publication, using the high-res TIFFs (the ones
you saved at the correct size in Photoshop). Make two PDFs. For the
first one, use the "Print" Job Option settings in Distiller. For the
other, use the "Screen" settings. This is a much easier way to go.
Unfortunately, it tends to produce awfully blurry images, and people
tend to complain.

Try both methods and see what you prefer.

HTH,

Dick


> The answer we received to a prior question (shown below), is not what we are
> looking for. Although, it might be the only answer.

> The sample below is 2 megs, and we need to reduce the size if possible.
> We get high res TIFF images from everyone for insertion in the magazine.

> 1. Would InDesign give us more flexibility?

> 2. How should we scale the original images so they are not so large in the
> final document?

> 3. Are we mistaken and Pagemaker handles this automatically?

> Thxs: Phil

> Greetings --



>>We publish an eMagazine on telecommunications that is created in PageMaker
>>7.0 and Acrobat 5.0

>>The eMagazine can be viewed at:
>>www.nug-it.org/sample

>>How should we reduce the size of the PDF file so that it can be viewed or
>>printed (black & white or color) with a lower resolution and still

> maintain

>>quality.

>>Thxs: Phil

> The only way I have found to make this work completely acceptably is to
> provide a link to a 300dpi version (one PDF per page), with a caution that
> downloads will be slow.

> Peggy


 
 
 

Image Size Required

Post by NUG-I » Mon, 16 Jun 2003 06:37:00


Thanks for the tips.

We will try experimenting with our PDFs.

Up until now we emailed the magazine. With this issue we are going to try
having the readers download it. Many firms have placed a 500K cap on emailed
files.

The magazine is not printed by us, but rather by the reader, and many use
color lasers.

Thxs: Phil

> Phil,

> You need the high-res TIFFs for printing but not for viewing on the Web.
> It is easy enough to produce a lower-resolution PDF for viewing on the
> Web, but if the user wants to download a PDF for printing, they will
> need access to one with higher-resolution images. I think what Peggy was
> suggesting is that you provide a link (with a suitable warning about
> file size) for those individuals who want the high-res version.

> However, for them to print on a desktop printer, they do not need as
> high a resolution as your offset printing company might want from you
> (assuming you get the magazine printed as well as providing it
> electronically, which may not be what you are doing).

> You have a couple of choices here.

> The first thing you want to do is open the images in Photoshop and
> reduce them to the resolution you need (most people say 200 dpi is
> plenty for laser printing) at the exact size you want them in the
> publication. Then place them, in PageMaker, at 100% size. Yes, you can
> rescale them in PageMaker, but this does not solve your file size
> problem. (If you do rescale in PM, hold down both the shift and ctrl
> keys. This forces the image to scale to only those percentages that will
> print satisfactorily on your target printer.)

> Here is where your two options diverge:

> Option 1.

> Keep your PageMaker file in the same flat directory with all of your
> resized image files. Copy the entire directory and save it under a
> different name ("lo-res," for example). Open all of the images in the
> lo-res directory in Photoshop. Resave them at 72 dpi, but the same image
> size. Open the copy of your PageMaker file. If the stars are properly
> aligned, everything will link properly to the lower-resolution images.
> Make two PDFs, one from each PM file, and label them for their
> respective purposes.

> Option 2.

> Just make one PageMaker publication, using the high-res TIFFs (the ones
> you saved at the correct size in Photoshop). Make two PDFs. For the
> first one, use the "Print" Job Option settings in Distiller. For the
> other, use the "Screen" settings. This is a much easier way to go.
> Unfortunately, it tends to produce awfully blurry images, and people
> tend to complain.

> Try both methods and see what you prefer.

> HTH,

>*


> > The answer we received to a prior question (shown below), is not what we
are
> > looking for. Although, it might be the only answer.

> > The sample below is 2 megs, and we need to reduce the size if possible.
> > We get high res TIFF images from everyone for insertion in the magazine.

> > 1. Would InDesign give us more flexibility?

> > 2. How should we scale the original images so they are not so large in
the
> > final document?

> > 3. Are we mistaken and Pagemaker handles this automatically?

> > Thxs: Phil

> > Greetings --



> >>We publish an eMagazine on telecommunications that is created in
PageMaker
> >>7.0 and Acrobat 5.0

> >>The eMagazine can be viewed at:
> >>www.nug-it.org/sample

> >>How should we reduce the size of the PDF file so that it can be viewed
or
> >>printed (black & white or color) with a lower resolution and still

> > maintain

> >>quality.

> >>Thxs: Phil

> > The only way I have found to make this work completely acceptably is to
> > provide a link to a 300dpi version (one PDF per page), with a caution
that
> > downloads will be slow.

> > Peggy

 
 
 

Image Size Required

Post by Brian » Tue, 17 Jun 2003 20:55:13


Or you could try a modification of*'s option #2, but instead of using
Screen or Print settings for creating the PDF, modify the downsampling and
compression settings by first selecting one of those, then using the "Edit
Job Options" button and select the "Compression" tab page.  Then you could,
for example, set it to use bicubic downsampling for images above 150dpi to
150dpi, which is probably the lower limit for decent quality printing on a
desktop printer, and set the compression quality to medium, or whatever.
Then "Save as" and give your custom setting a name to use in the future, and
experiment with different settings to see what tradeoff you get between PDF
file size and printed image quality.  Of course, the more TIF images used in
the document, the greater the file size, so you may want to develop some
rule of thumb for what percentage of average page area can be images, versus
text or graphics, depending on document length too.  If you are distributing
the PDF file and not the PM file, then there's no need to change the
original high quality TIFFs placed in the PM file, unless you need to
actually change the image dimensions or scale them down relative to the page
size, which may help to reduce the file size, as* pointed out,
especially for those nearly full page images.
Anyway, I would definitely look into tweaking those downsampling and
compression settings in the Acrobat distiller to get your best tradeoff
between file size and printed image quality, and then you could avoid having
to keep two different versions, when a full 300dpi version is probably going
to be too big anyway.
That's my 2 cents,
-Brian


> Thanks for the tips.

> We will try experimenting with our PDFs.

> Up until now we emailed the magazine. With this issue we are going to try
> having the readers download it. Many firms have placed a 500K cap on
emailed
> files.

> The magazine is not printed by us, but rather by the reader, and many use
> color lasers.

> Thxs: Phil


> > Phil,

> > You need the high-res TIFFs for printing but not for viewing on the Web.
> > It is easy enough to produce a lower-resolution PDF for viewing on the
> > Web, but if the user wants to download a PDF for printing, they will
> > need access to one with higher-resolution images. I think what Peggy was
> > suggesting is that you provide a link (with a suitable warning about
> > file size) for those individuals who want the high-res version.

> > However, for them to print on a desktop printer, they do not need as
> > high a resolution as your offset printing company might want from you
> > (assuming you get the magazine printed as well as providing it
> > electronically, which may not be what you are doing).

> > You have a couple of choices here.

> > The first thing you want to do is open the images in Photoshop and
> > reduce them to the resolution you need (most people say 200 dpi is
> > plenty for laser printing) at the exact size you want them in the
> > publication. Then place them, in PageMaker, at 100% size. Yes, you can
> > rescale them in PageMaker, but this does not solve your file size
> > problem. (If you do rescale in PM, hold down both the shift and ctrl
> > keys. This forces the image to scale to only those percentages that will
> > print satisfactorily on your target printer.)

> > Here is where your two options diverge:

> > Option 1.

> > Keep your PageMaker file in the same flat directory with all of your
> > resized image files. Copy the entire directory and save it under a
> > different name ("lo-res," for example). Open all of the images in the
> > lo-res directory in Photoshop. Resave them at 72 dpi, but the same image
> > size. Open the copy of your PageMaker file. If the stars are properly
> > aligned, everything will link properly to the lower-resolution images.
> > Make two PDFs, one from each PM file, and label them for their
> > respective purposes.

> > Option 2.

> > Just make one PageMaker publication, using the high-res TIFFs (the ones
> > you saved at the correct size in Photoshop). Make two PDFs. For the
> > first one, use the "Print" Job Option settings in Distiller. For the
> > other, use the "Screen" settings. This is a much easier way to go.
> > Unfortunately, it tends to produce awfully blurry images, and people
> > tend to complain.

> > Try both methods and see what you prefer.

> > HTH,

> >*


> > > The answer we received to a prior question (shown below), is not what
we
> are
> > > looking for. Although, it might be the only answer.

> > > The sample below is 2 megs, and we need to reduce the size if
possible.
> > > We get high res TIFF images from everyone for insertion in the
magazine.

> > > 1. Would InDesign give us more flexibility?

> > > 2. How should we scale the original images so they are not so large in
> the
> > > final document?

> > > 3. Are we mistaken and Pagemaker handles this automatically?

> > > Thxs: Phil

> > > Greetings --



> > >>We publish an eMagazine on telecommunications that is created in
> PageMaker
> > >>7.0 and Acrobat 5.0

> > >>The eMagazine can be viewed at:
> > >>www.nug-it.org/sample

> > >>How should we reduce the size of the PDF file so that it can be viewed
> or
> > >>printed (black & white or color) with a lower resolution and still

> > > maintain

> > >>quality.

> > >>Thxs: Phil

> > > The only way I have found to make this work completely acceptably is
to
> > > provide a link to a 300dpi version (one PDF per page), with a caution
> that
> > > downloads will be slow.

> > > Peggy