dual processor?

dual processor?

Post by Sy » Sun, 13 Jul 2003 04:43:46



I am considering assembling my own computer for running Maya and related
programs (Photoshop, etc).
I keep reading of people using dual processor machines, so I would like to
do the same, but the price is 4 times higher than that of a
single-processor, so before I put out the money I want to be sure it's worth
it.
Does Maya use both processors only during batch render or also in the
interactive part? My greatest slowdowns seem to happen while I am modelling,
and the poly count and history get bigger and bigger, to a point where
simple move and rotate aren't interactive anymore. I would like to speed
that up much more than, say, a batch render. Would a dual processor help in
this case? If not, what would make the most difference? Lots of memory?
Better graphics card?
If the interactive part of Maya doesn't use both CPUs, then I would do
better with the latest Pentium 4, which is faster than the Xeon.
I would very much appreciate any of your help.
Thank you!
 
 
 

dual processor?

Post by Tonci Neme » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 20:45:01


A few posts back, someone said that Maya doesn't support multi-threading in
viewport updating and IPR. Which means that for the most part, two or more
CPUs seem to make a difference only at render-time. I think that pretty much
answers your question. I have read somewhere that IPR is multi-threaded, so
you better get some more opinions on that one.

If you want to speed up viewport redraw, go for a good graphics card
(professional, none of that games-stuff). I heard that FireGL X1 is pretty
impressive (and expensive). In any case, that is a whole different question.
I suggest you check recent newsgroup archives and even recent posts, since
questions about graphics cards are very common and maybe you'll find some
answers before you decide there's a need to post another question about
"which graphics card is best for Maya".

A fast CPU and loads of RAM can't hurt. And it'll still be cheaper than a
dual-CPU system.

Rendering is something that benefits greatly from multiple CPUs, though. If
you really don't care that much about rendering, the above should apply
nicely.

Regards,

Tonci


Quote:> I am considering assembling my own computer for running Maya and related
> programs (Photoshop, etc).
> I keep reading of people using dual processor machines, so I would like to
> do the same, but the price is 4 times higher than that of a
> single-processor, so before I put out the money I want to be sure it's
worth
> it.
> Does Maya use both processors only during batch render or also in the
> interactive part? My greatest slowdowns seem to happen while I am
modelling,
> and the poly count and history get bigger and bigger, to a point where
> simple move and rotate aren't interactive anymore. I would like to speed
> that up much more than, say, a batch render. Would a dual processor help
in
> this case? If not, what would make the most difference? Lots of memory?
> Better graphics card?
> If the interactive part of Maya doesn't use both CPUs, then I would do
> better with the latest Pentium 4, which is faster than the Xeon.
> I would very much appreciate any of your help.
> Thank you!


 
 
 

dual processor?

Post by hj » Mon, 14 Jul 2003 22:37:23


RAM

(Note thats not to say other components wont pay off. A powerful
graphic card can provide faster OpenGL renders (vieport) and some of
which may even be capable of providing far more accurate
previews--like bumps)

Just curious, Have you had the opportunity to toil with any of Maya's
Dynamics?


> I am considering assembling my own computer for running Maya and related
> programs (Photoshop, etc).
> I keep reading of people using dual processor machines, so I would like to
> do the same, but the price is 4 times higher than that of a
> single-processor, so before I put out the money I want to be sure it's worth
> it.
> Does Maya use both processors only during batch render or also in the
> interactive part? My greatest slowdowns seem to happen while I am modelling,
> and the poly count and history get bigger and bigger, to a point where
> simple move and rotate aren't interactive anymore. I would like to speed
> that up much more than, say, a batch render. Would a dual processor help in
> this case? If not, what would make the most difference? Lots of memory?
> Better graphics card?
> If the interactive part of Maya doesn't use both CPUs, then I would do
> better with the latest Pentium 4, which is faster than the Xeon.
> I would very much appreciate any of your help.
> Thank you!

 
 
 

dual processor?

Post by Nick » Tue, 15 Jul 2003 21:09:34


I've just finished building my Maya/Max workhorse and it goes great!
Although i am disapointed that the P4s fsb is running faster then the Xeons
but i guess thats the way technology goes these days!

I'm working on a;

Dual Xeon 2.8ghz HT enabled
2gig PC2100 ECC mem
Quadro4 980 XGL

If you want to really improve your viewports then i would first look at
upgrading to a highend OpenGL card (the 980 goes ok but i would be keen for
something sporting v2 in OGL like what Tonci suggested - FireGL x1 ..but
that will hurt the wallet) and then work on the CPU and memory. When you
start populating with high dynamics and mesh resolution you will thank
yourself for saving for those extra few weeks in order to go the next level
up in your CPU choice. If you're serious about 3D then get serious with your
hardware and Dual is the only way to go :)

Goodluck!
Nick.


Quote:> I am considering assembling my own computer for running Maya and related
> programs (Photoshop, etc).
> I keep reading of people using dual processor machines, so I would like to
> do the same, but the price is 4 times higher than that of a
> single-processor, so before I put out the money I want to be sure it's
worth
> it.
> Does Maya use both processors only during batch render or also in the
> interactive part? My greatest slowdowns seem to happen while I am
modelling,
> and the poly count and history get bigger and bigger, to a point where
> simple move and rotate aren't interactive anymore. I would like to speed
> that up much more than, say, a batch render. Would a dual processor help
in
> this case? If not, what would make the most difference? Lots of memory?
> Better graphics card?
> If the interactive part of Maya doesn't use both CPUs, then I would do
> better with the latest Pentium 4, which is faster than the Xeon.
> I would very much appreciate any of your help.
> Thank you!

 
 
 

dual processor?

Post by Sy » Wed, 16 Jul 2003 02:50:30


Thank you so much everybody for your feedback, it REALLY HELPS!
I must say that the idea of dual is interesting, but as someone pointed out,
it is quite expensive, and I want to make sure I don't waste money in a dual
processor that I could for example spend in a high end graphics card.
Also, when I am modeling and the computer hangs up on me for a couple of
minutes, the hard disk light doesn't come up, which tells me there is enough
RAM for not needing to swap; hence the CPU is doing most of the work and the
faster the CPU, the less hang up time, right?
I must admit that I haven't had to render anything really really huge, so
maybe, I buy a single CPU and then get stuck on some really large render and
wonder why I didn't listen to the guy that told me to by a dual... :)

I will appreciate more comments from people with both kinds of
configurations! And of course if there are any Alias|Wavefront people who
can give me suggestions based on knowledge on how Maya works internally,
that would also be much appreciated.

 
 
 

dual processor?

Post by Nick » Wed, 16 Jul 2003 12:59:22


Quote:> I must admit that I haven't had to render anything really really huge, so
> maybe, I buy a single CPU and then get stuck on some really large render
and
> wonder why I didn't listen to the guy that told me to by a dual... :)

If you're thinking of getting serious with Maya (or any 3d Software) then
setting up your hardware to cater for it is a big deal (and expensive).
Maybe now you won't uterlize the resources and benefits of dual but give
yourself 6 months working within the software and the complexity of your
skills increases it may be better waiting a while longer to cater for your
needs in the future rather then now. Your 3d software is not the only thing
that loves the dual config, your comp/editing software will more then likely
take advantage of this and will benfit your projects. Good luck. Nicko.
 
 
 

dual processor?

Post by Jaka Zva » Wed, 16 Jul 2003 16:19:41


you coul also consider buying another computer, just for rendering. it could
be cheaper than dual and you get a whole comp. connect them and distribute
rendering.


Quote:> Thank you so much everybody for your feedback, it REALLY HELPS!
> I must say that the idea of dual is interesting, but as someone pointed
out,
> it is quite expensive, and I want to make sure I don't waste money in a
dual
> processor that I could for example spend in a high end graphics card.
> Also, when I am modeling and the computer hangs up on me for a couple of
> minutes, the hard disk light doesn't come up, which tells me there is
enough
> RAM for not needing to swap; hence the CPU is doing most of the work and
the
> faster the CPU, the less hang up time, right?
> I must admit that I haven't had to render anything really really huge, so
> maybe, I buy a single CPU and then get stuck on some really large render
and
> wonder why I didn't listen to the guy that told me to by a dual... :)

> I will appreciate more comments from people with both kinds of
> configurations! And of course if there are any Alias|Wavefront people who
> can give me suggestions based on knowledge on how Maya works internally,
> that would also be much appreciated.