Triangle Strips for Games?

Triangle Strips for Games?

Post by Daniel Werne » Thu, 22 Jul 1999 04:00:00



I am writing a game and I am succesfully reading my .3ds models into
memory but in my game there will be a lot of creatures each with a
reasonably low polygon count. I am wondering what other games do to
draw models, do they use triangle strips? I have been reading about
triangle strips but OpenGL doesn't support generalized triangle
strips with a bit for flipping the order of vertices, so I would
have to pass an extra vertice for each turn, probably for every
triangle. Also, because of the small number of polygons I
wonder if the overhead of having multiple strips for a small
object is even worth it? Should I just stick with vertex arrays or maybe
even use the compiled vertex array extension?

Thanks,
Daniel Werner

 
 
 

Triangle Strips for Games?

Post by Bart van Hes » Thu, 22 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:> I am writing a game and I am succesfully reading my .3ds models into
> memory but in my game there will be a lot of creatures each with a
> reasonably low polygon count. I am wondering what other games do to
> draw models, do they use triangle strips? I have been reading about
> triangle strips but OpenGL doesn't support generalized triangle
> strips with a bit for flipping the order of vertices, so I would
> have to pass an extra vertice for each turn, probably for every
> triangle. Also, because of the small number of polygons I
> wonder if the overhead of having multiple strips for a small
> object is even worth it? Should I just stick with vertex arrays or maybe
> even use the compiled vertex array extension?

Triangle strips are saving lots of T&L time. So are compiled vertex arrays.
I use tristrips and compiled vertex arrays even for 16-poly models, and it
just works.

Bart van Hest

 
 
 

1. Triangle Strip Preserving LOD (T-Strip LOD)

Hey Guys

I have a paper and demo on a new alternative to ROAM and other CLOD
algorithms for terrain LOD. I call it T-Strip LOD and it basicly subdivides
complete lines instead of triangles, esentially giving you the same
structure of a quad tree, except that blocks form a contigious line across
one axis which give you the contigious trinagle strip. It's relativly simple
and takes advantage of the high processing power of todays hardware
graphics, but with less CPU usage than conventional LOD algorithms. Perhaps
not as effective as VIPM, it may still prove to be relavent in certain
environments where there is deforming terrain, extensive terrain collision,
and mapping objects to the visble terrain mesh is required. It's more of a
cross between brute force triangle strip rendering  and CLOD.

Anyhow, the paper and demo are up at
http://chat.carleton.ca/~eszoka/tstriplod/tstrip.htm, note the demo takes 30
seconds or so to generate the terrain texture, read the readme.txt for the
keys to operate the various features and controls.

Any thoughs or comments would be appreciated.

Ernest Szoka
http://chat.carleton.ca/~eszoka/

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