Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Jeff W » Fri, 26 May 2000 04:00:00



I have never touched 3D graphics programming in my life.  I know 2D
fairly well, and I'm a pretty experienced C, C++, Java programmer. I
also have a strong math background, 2 years of college math at UCSD,
including a class on matrix manipulations.  What would be a good book to
start out with?  I tried looking through "OpenGL Programming Guide, 2nd
Edition" but the thing that totally confused me was the stuff on
lighting and camera placement.  Is there soem kind of background I
should have before getting into this?  And if so, what books would you
recomend?  Thanks for your help.

--
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Jeff W., ICQ# 17989474

http://coredump.cc
http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Alley/3450/index.html

 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by ECKILLE » Fri, 26 May 2000 04:00:00



Quote:> I have never touched 3D graphics programming in my life.  I know 2D
> fairly well, and I'm a pretty experienced C, C++, Java programmer. I
> also have a strong math background, 2 years of college math at UCSD,
> including a class on matrix manipulations.  What would be a good book to
> start out with?  I tried looking through "OpenGL Programming Guide, 2nd
> Edition" but the thing that totally confused me was the stuff on
> lighting and camera placement.  Is there soem kind of background I
> should have before getting into this?  And if so, what books would you
> recomend?  Thanks for your help.

> --
> -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
> Jeff W., ICQ# 17989474

> http://coredump.cc
> http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Alley/3450/index.html


 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by ECKILLE » Fri, 26 May 2000 04:00:00


Hmmmm, did you actually start at the beginning of the OpenGL programming
guide??  You might want to check out the OpenGL super bible as its a bit
easiere to understand i thought, but it doesnt go into as much detail as the
programming guide.  Although from your backgroud i would think the openGL
programming uide would be no sweat.  Try reading it more slowly and try
entering the code samples in yourself and compiling.


Quote:> I have never touched 3D graphics programming in my life.  I know 2D
> fairly well, and I'm a pretty experienced C, C++, Java programmer. I
> also have a strong math background, 2 years of college math at UCSD,
> including a class on matrix manipulations.  What would be a good book to
> start out with?  I tried looking through "OpenGL Programming Guide, 2nd
> Edition" but the thing that totally confused me was the stuff on
> lighting and camera placement.  Is there soem kind of background I
> should have before getting into this?  And if so, what books would you
> recomend?  Thanks for your help.

> --
> -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
> Jeff W., ICQ# 17989474

> http://coredump.cc
> http://www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/Alley/3450/index.html

 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Sardauka » Fri, 26 May 2000 04:00:00


see the mmoire section of http://ferretti.homepage.com : all the 3d
concepts( but in french)

--
===============================
fabio

icq: 56249080
===============================

 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Gary Kin » Fri, 26 May 2000 04:00:00


The bible (Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice, 2nd Edition in
C, by Foley, van Dam, Feiner, and Hughes) is an absolute must-buy for
anyone interested in learning graphics properly.  It provides a
foundation in virtually all topics (from simple orthographic
projection to global illumination models), and covers the more
elementary topics in a great deal of detail.

After FvD, I would recommend the Graphics Gems books (5 books of code
snippets, extremely high-quality) and Watts' Advanced Animation and
Rendering Techniques.  The Red Book is another must-have.  That about
covers all the bound books I have on my shelf.  I've also got hundreds
of PDFs either saved or printed of SigGraph papers, white papers, etc.

Another book I would recommend is Introduction to Algorithms by
Cormen, Leiserson and Rivest.  It is only tangentally related to
graphics, but it does give a good introduction to algorithm design and
implementation - cornerstones of efficient 3D graphics programming.

- Gary

Quote:>I have never touched 3D graphics programming in my life.  I know 2D
>fairly well, and I'm a pretty experienced C, C++, Java programmer. I
>also have a strong math background, 2 years of college math at UCSD,
>including a class on matrix manipulations.  What would be a good book to
>start out with?  I tried looking through "OpenGL Programming Guide, 2nd
>Edition" but the thing that totally confused me was the stuff on
>lighting and camera placement.  Is there soem kind of background I
>should have before getting into this?  And if so, what books would you
>recomend?  Thanks for your help.

 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Charles E Hardwidg » Fri, 26 May 2000 04:00:00


Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice, 2nd Edition in C, by Foley, van
Dam, Feiner, and Hughes is now *out* of print, although a copy could
doubtless be obtained from somewhere. A third edition is planned for
January/February 20001. Overall, I found it to be a slightly disappointing
although worth reading as a first book.

--
Antispam Email Address; Replace nospam with blueyonder to reply.

 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Helio » Fri, 26 May 2000 04:00:00


It would be interesting how far computer graphics will be in 20001....

Helios


> Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice, 2nd Edition in C, by Foley, van
> Dam, Feiner, and Hughes is now *out* of print, although a copy could
> doubtless be obtained from somewhere. A third edition is planned for
> January/February 20001. Overall, I found it to be a slightly disappointing
> although worth reading as a first book.

> --
> Antispam Email Address; Replace nospam with blueyonder to reply.

 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Joel Parri » Fri, 26 May 2000 04:00:00


Amazon.com lists the book as available.


Quote:> Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice, 2nd Edition in C, by Foley,
van
> Dam, Feiner, and Hughes is now *out* of print, although a copy could
> doubtless be obtained from somewhere. A third edition is planned for
> January/February 20001. Overall, I found it to be a slightly disappointing
> although worth reading as a first book.

> --
> Antispam Email Address; Replace nospam with blueyonder to reply.

 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Gary Kin » Fri, 26 May 2000 04:00:00


On Thu, 25 May 2000 12:11:09 GMT, "Charles E Hardwidge"


>Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice, 2nd Edition in C, by Foley, van
>Dam, Feiner, and Hughes is now *out* of print, although a copy could
>doubtless be obtained from somewhere. A third edition is planned for
>January/February 20001. Overall, I found it to be a slightly disappointing
>although worth reading as a first book.

Really?  I find it an excellent reference on the generic 3D pipeline
in general, and common image-quality techniques (e.g., anti-aliasing,
texture filtering, etc.).  I prefer "Advanced Animation and Rendering
Techniques," by Alan Watt, as it covers quite a bit of modern-day (or
soon-to-be modern-day) real time techniques, in addition to very good
sections on Radiosity, ray tracing, and animation.  It also has more
actual code, which I find a bit more useful in many cases than the
psedu-code in FvD.

Regardless, no one would go wrong by reading FvD as a first book.  I'm
interested in seeing what they have added to the new edition.

 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Andrew F. Vespe » Fri, 26 May 2000 04:00:00



> Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice, 2nd Edition in C, by Foley, van
> Dam, Feiner, and Hughes is now *out* of print, although a copy could
> doubtless be obtained from somewhere. A third edition is planned for
> January/February 20001. Overall, I found it to be a slightly disappointing
> although worth reading as a first book.

Sorry, I can't wait 18001 years for the next edition.

--
Andy V (OpenGL Alpha Geek)
"In order to make progress, one must leave the door to the unknown ajar."
Richard P. Feynman, quoted by Jagdish Mehra in _The Beat of a Different Drum_.

Paul Martz's OpenGL FAQ: http://www.frii.com/~martz/oglfaq

 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Gary Kin » Fri, 26 May 2000 04:00:00


On Fri, 26 May 2000 01:35:47 GMT, "Charles E Hardwidge"


>Congratulations "Helios" and Mr Vesper. You have won the "spot the typo
>competition". Good job I don't use email to write cheques :)

>As for the Principles and Practice book, a third revision is indeed timely.
>I find that as a sole reference it does lack in a number of areas, and needs
>to be supplemented with other books, research papers, and copious trawling
>of the net. Interactive Computer Graphics (Berger, Gillis) is a leave over
>from my days at university, and is also a useable book. For something more
>meaty and in-line with real-time "game" applications, maybe Gary Kings
>suggestion of "Advanced Animation and Rendering Techniques" (Alan Watt), is
>worth looking at.

FYI, here's the chapter list from the Watt book (I'm sure this is
available on-line somewhere, like Amazon):

1.  Rendering Polygonal Objects (pp 1 - 28)
2. The theory and practice of light/object interaction (pp 31 - 62)
3. The theory and practice of parametric rep. techniques (pp 65 - 108)
4. The theory and practice of anti-aliasing techniques (pp 111 - 150)
5.  Shadow generation techniques
6.  Mapping techniques: texture and environment mapping
7.  Procedural texture mapping and modelling
8.  Ray tracing I : basic recursive ray tracing
9.  Ray tracing II : practical ray tracing
10.  Ray tracing III : advanced ray tracing models
11.  Radiosity methods
12.  Global illumination models
13.  Volume rendering techniques
14.  Advanced rendering interfaces: shading languages and RenderMan
15.  Overview and low-level motion specification
16.  Animating articulated structures
17.  Soft Object animation
18.  Procedural animation

Definitely not a book for those just starting out with CG, as it does
very little hand-holding through the early chapters, which is where
FvD spends quite a bit of time.  However, the book does cover a LOT of
topics well, and I highly recommend it - especially since chapters
5-7, 14, and 15-17 are becoming so commonplace in the games industry.

- Gary

 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Charles E Hardwidg » Sat, 27 May 2000 04:00:00


Congratulations "Helios" and Mr Vesper. You have won the "spot the typo
competition". Good job I don't use email to write cheques :)

As for the Principles and Practice book, a third revision is indeed timely.
I find that as a sole reference it does lack in a number of areas, and needs
to be supplemented with other books, research papers, and copious trawling
of the net. Interactive Computer Graphics (Berger, Gillis) is a leave over
from my days at university, and is also a useable book. For something more
meaty and in-line with real-time "game" applications, maybe Gary Kings
suggestion of "Advanced Animation and Rendering Techniques" (Alan Watt), is
worth looking at.

--
Antispam Email Address; Replace nospam with blueyonder to reply.

 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Charles E Hardwidg » Sat, 27 May 2000 04:00:00


Sheesh, I'm up to late. Thanks for the chapter list, it provides a clearer
picture of what the book is about. Very useful. As you point out, a number
of chapters are of interest to those wishing to develop on par with current
and emerging engines. Without recommendations it is difficult to pluck a
book out of the air. While much of the required material is readily
available on the net, you can't beat a good book. I'll make a note to check
this one out. Thanks.

--
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Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Tony Savesk » Sat, 27 May 2000 04:00:00


I found this book very useful...there's no bullsh*t and it does cover a lot.
It is pretty dry tho and has a very academic feel to it. Heavy on the maths,
which is good, and it has a GREAT bibliography. Also, you won't find much
code in there, so you're on your own when it comes to implementing
things...which is also good.

Actually, I'd say it's a lot like Foley/VanDame without all the waffle.

TONY



Quote:> Sheesh, I'm up to late. Thanks for the chapter list, it provides a clearer
> picture of what the book is about. Very useful. As you point out, a number
> of chapters are of interest to those wishing to develop on par with
current
> and emerging engines. Without recommendations it is difficult to pluck a
> book out of the air. While much of the required material is readily
> available on the net, you can't beat a good book. I'll make a note to
check
> this one out. Thanks.

> --
> Antispam Email Address; Replace nospam with blueyonder to reply.

 
 
 

Books for someone who has never done 3D?

Post by Geert Poel » Sat, 27 May 2000 04:00:00


still at Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0201848406



Quote:> Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice, 2nd Edition in C, by Foley,
van
> Dam, Feiner, and Hughes is now *out* of print, although a copy could
> doubtless be obtained from somewhere. A third edition is planned for
> January/February 20001. Overall, I found it to be a slightly disappointing
> although worth reading as a first book.

> --
> Antispam Email Address; Replace nospam with blueyonder to reply.

 
 
 

1. Why hasn't someone done this???

An idea for any techy. As a photographer, I sed (back in pre digital days)
to buy certain film types for example Ektachrome 400 and have it pushed 2
stops to get grain the size of marbles, and many other things like using
tri-x or xp1400 and so on......

Why not create filters for us photogs who love digital but miss that
creativity.  I know pshop can do this stuff but my job is visualising the
picture and capturing it, not lots of post production on a computer.

Gary

2. Visual Reality ?

3. 3D Programming books (formerly Cameras in 3D, also Good 3D Graphics books)

4. Screendumps in InDesign

5. It's done, done, done!

6. Driving a Vinyl Cutter

7. Need someone to create book cover art

8. Book Cover for Poetry and Words sketch done in PSP6.02

9. Need ADVANCED PSP 6 Book - Done the SAMS Teach Yorself 24hr alredy (beginner/intermediate)

10. Can someone recommend a good Lightwave book?

11. can someone suggest a good book for beginners?

12. My way of having 3D stars in Povray3