Advice ref Branch Office Setup

Advice ref Branch Office Setup

Post by Mike Morga » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



Hi all, hope someone can help me.

Senario -

HeadOffice - running SBS 4.5 with 30 users. SBS server handles Exchange and
Proxy. A single NT 4 member server is on the network which holds all the
admin files (Word documents). The Accounts department runs a NetWare server
(6 users)as their primary, which has access to the SBS domain and
vice-versa. I hope to get rid of this Netware server over the next six
months and put the Acc's system onto the NT server.

Branch Office - running Novell Netware V3.2 5 user.

A leased (kilostream) 64k line links the two sites together so that anyone
(who has the correct client and rights) can access each network. It is
primarily used by the accounts department at HQ so that they can run the
purchase ledger at the remote site.

The MD has told me that he wants the users at the branch (remote) site to be
able to e-mail internally to the main office and also to run Proxy Server
for Internet access for the remote site. This will undoubtably also lead to
external mail as well.

My question - should I have a NT member server at the remote site with
authenication being performed over the 64k line with the PDC at HQ ? I
assume this would also mean all mails being forwarded to the PDC. With
mailboxes being constantly checked how fast would this be? At logon time do
they go away and make a cup of tea due to the time it is going to take to
log in ? Proxy I would try to keep local on the NT member server.  I would
normally install a SBS system in the branch office and use some form of mail
forwarding to transfer mail between the two, but I know that you cannot have
a trust relationship between two SBS domains, and this would stop me from
being able to use the leased line, right ? Do I need to go to full
BackOffice for both sites ?

Sorry if I am rambling a bit; any adive would be gratefully received.

Regards
Mike.

 
 
 

Advice ref Branch Office Setup

Post by Jeff Middleto » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00


Hi Mike,

Couple of questions would need to be resolved, but the situation is
workable.

With only 5 nodes in the remote office, the first question is are the
stations used 1:1, or do you have 15 users and 5 stations?  I ask because of
the configuration process, and the number of logons.

I assume you intend to keep a file server in that office regardless,
therefore there would not be the file traffic moving across, only the logon
authentication and the email.  If you intend to use Proxy, then that
contributes to the use of bandwidth too.  How heavy is the Proxy use
expected?

Logon with authentication over the 64Kb line is not really bad, about 60-90
secs. max if there is no local server running the logon.  If you modify the
logon scripts to omit the line that call startcli.exe for each logon, you
will find a significant improvement, perhaps only a 10-15 sec. delay due to
the WAN based logon.  If you must do a bunch of logon tasks, then you would
want to "trap" the logon of these computers and have them execute local
scripts rather than ones over the WAN, but that need not mean that you
establish a BDC in the remote office, though you could.  You could execute a
local script by simply having the SBS logon script use a 'call' statement to
a path on the local server.

Using the SBS as the PDC and no BDC really isn't the problem with a static
WAN link like this.  You will find that authentication is pretty quick even
without a BDC, it's strictly a matter of choice about doing the BDC if you
have a lot of security and logon authentication to do.  Using a BDC would be
fine, but you will introduce a bit more traffic to the WAN due to the BDC
maintenance activities for replication and such.  Keep in mind that the BDC
and the PDC are going to chat every 10-15 minutes all day, all night.  If
this is a DOD line, then you will have the line popup all the time.  If
that's a concern, then I would not make the BDC, just make a member server.

With SBS, there are recommendations to create a local copy of the ClientApps
folder for client installations.  This does not require a BDC, just need for
you to run the client install from the local machine manually.  There's a
technote on this.

Q183234 - Small Business Server Client Applications Cannot Be Installed over
a Modem
Q196094 - How to Manually Install Small Business Server Clients

As for WAN transfer speeds, you probably already have a feel for the
performance now.  The Proxy traffic is not going to be blazing.  You would
benefit if the WAN is only 64K if you have routers that do compression.
However, you probably realize that compressed graphics, including faxes are
not going to be really quick to move across, therefore you will need to look
at this as a speed concern if the email is going to contain a lot of fax
traffic and you have other operations using the WAN link.  For instance, if
someone in the remote site gets a 6 page fax, or an email with 10 photos,
when that email downloads, the WAN link will halt all other activities till
the pipe is cleared.  This means that any Proxy traffic will cease for the
other users, so will any logon authentication if that's an issue.  These are
not really problems, more like issues.

I would think that you might want to have Offline folders established for
all these users to improve the speed of the email handling.  If the users
have their access to the WAN 24/7, most of the mail will move pretty
quietly.  If the web access with Proxy is fairly casual, it should be fine.
The BDC with only 5 users is a debate.  I would likely not do it unless you
get to 8-10 computers or 10+ users and frequent logons.


Quote:> Hi all, hope someone can help me.

> Senario -

> HeadOffice - running SBS 4.5 with 30 users. SBS server handles Exchange
and
> Proxy. A single NT 4 member server is on the network which holds all the
> admin files (Word documents). The Accounts department runs a NetWare
server
> (6 users)as their primary, which has access to the SBS domain and
> vice-versa. I hope to get rid of this Netware server over the next six
> months and put the Acc's system onto the NT server.

> Branch Office - running Novell Netware V3.2 5 user.

> A leased (kilostream) 64k line links the two sites together so that anyone
> (who has the correct client and rights) can access each network. It is
> primarily used by the accounts department at HQ so that they can run the
> purchase ledger at the remote site.

> The MD has told me that he wants the users at the branch (remote) site to
be
> able to e-mail internally to the main office and also to run Proxy Server
> for Internet access for the remote site. This will undoubtably also lead
to
> external mail as well.

> My question - should I have a NT member server at the remote site with
> authenication being performed over the 64k line with the PDC at HQ ? I
> assume this would also mean all mails being forwarded to the PDC. With
> mailboxes being constantly checked how fast would this be? At logon time
do
> they go away and make a cup of tea due to the time it is going to take to
> log in ? Proxy I would try to keep local on the NT member server.  I would
> normally install a SBS system in the branch office and use some form of
mail
> forwarding to transfer mail between the two, but I know that you cannot
have
> a trust relationship between two SBS domains, and this would stop me from
> being able to use the leased line, right ? Do I need to go to full
> BackOffice for both sites ?

> Sorry if I am rambling a bit; any adive would be gratefully received.

> Regards
> Mike.


 
 
 

Advice ref Branch Office Setup

Post by Mike Morga » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00


Thanks once again Jeff :))

The remote office will have five or six users on five or six workstations
(this will grow at a later date but I can increase the bandwidth when this
happens) and yes I will have a server there regardless.
The routers do have compression enabled and it is a 24/7 link so call costs
are not involved.
I think I will forget Proxy Server and have a simple ISDN router* off
the remote network for Internet use and leave the WAN link for Intranet /
Exchange Mail / other use. The Internet useage will not be high.
There are not many logon issues here, it actually is quite a simple system
that we run at the remote site.
I was slightly worried about login times, but if it is under a minute there
will be no problem. I will take your advice and remove startcli.exe from
startup.
I think I will go ahead with a member server, two net cards, one ISDN
router, authentication being performed over the WAN and most apps running
locally.

Thanks again Jeff.

Regards
Mike.


> Hi Mike,

> Couple of questions would need to be resolved, but the situation is
> workable.

> With only 5 nodes in the remote office, the first question is are the
> stations used 1:1, or do you have 15 users and 5 stations?  I ask because
of
> the configuration process, and the number of logons.

> I assume you intend to keep a file server in that office regardless,
> therefore there would not be the file traffic moving across, only the
logon
> authentication and the email.  If you intend to use Proxy, then that
> contributes to the use of bandwidth too.  How heavy is the Proxy use
> expected?

> Logon with authentication over the 64Kb line is not really bad, about
60-90
> secs. max if there is no local server running the logon.  If you modify
the
> logon scripts to omit the line that call startcli.exe for each logon, you
> will find a significant improvement, perhaps only a 10-15 sec. delay due
to
> the WAN based logon.  If you must do a bunch of logon tasks, then you
would
> want to "trap" the logon of these computers and have them execute local
> scripts rather than ones over the WAN, but that need not mean that you
> establish a BDC in the remote office, though you could.  You could execute
a
> local script by simply having the SBS logon script use a 'call' statement
to
> a path on the local server.

> Using the SBS as the PDC and no BDC really isn't the problem with a static
> WAN link like this.  You will find that authentication is pretty quick
even
> without a BDC, it's strictly a matter of choice about doing the BDC if you
> have a lot of security and logon authentication to do.  Using a BDC would
be
> fine, but you will introduce a bit more traffic to the WAN due to the BDC
> maintenance activities for replication and such.  Keep in mind that the
BDC
> and the PDC are going to chat every 10-15 minutes all day, all night.  If
> this is a DOD line, then you will have the line popup all the time.  If
> that's a concern, then I would not make the BDC, just make a member
server.

> With SBS, there are recommendations to create a local copy of the
ClientApps
> folder for client installations.  This does not require a BDC, just need
for
> you to run the client install from the local machine manually.  There's a
> technote on this.

> Q183234 - Small Business Server Client Applications Cannot Be Installed
over
> a Modem
> Q196094 - How to Manually Install Small Business Server Clients

> As for WAN transfer speeds, you probably already have a feel for the
> performance now.  The Proxy traffic is not going to be blazing.  You would
> benefit if the WAN is only 64K if you have routers that do compression.
> However, you probably realize that compressed graphics, including faxes
are
> not going to be really quick to move across, therefore you will need to
look
> at this as a speed concern if the email is going to contain a lot of fax
> traffic and you have other operations using the WAN link.  For instance,
if
> someone in the remote site gets a 6 page fax, or an email with 10 photos,
> when that email downloads, the WAN link will halt all other activities
till
> the pipe is cleared.  This means that any Proxy traffic will cease for the
> other users, so will any logon authentication if that's an issue.  These
are
> not really problems, more like issues.

> I would think that you might want to have Offline folders established for
> all these users to improve the speed of the email handling.  If the users
> have their access to the WAN 24/7, most of the mail will move pretty
> quietly.  If the web access with Proxy is fairly casual, it should be
fine.
> The BDC with only 5 users is a debate.  I would likely not do it unless
you
> get to 8-10 computers or 10+ users and frequent logons.



> > Hi all, hope someone can help me.

> > Senario -

> > HeadOffice - running SBS 4.5 with 30 users. SBS server handles Exchange
> and
> > Proxy. A single NT 4 member server is on the network which holds all the
> > admin files (Word documents). The Accounts department runs a NetWare
> server
> > (6 users)as their primary, which has access to the SBS domain and
> > vice-versa. I hope to get rid of this Netware server over the next six
> > months and put the Acc's system onto the NT server.

> > Branch Office - running Novell Netware V3.2 5 user.

> > A leased (kilostream) 64k line links the two sites together so that
anyone
> > (who has the correct client and rights) can access each network. It is
> > primarily used by the accounts department at HQ so that they can run the
> > purchase ledger at the remote site.

> > The MD has told me that he wants the users at the branch (remote) site
to
> be
> > able to e-mail internally to the main office and also to run Proxy
Server
> > for Internet access for the remote site. This will undoubtably also lead
> to
> > external mail as well.

> > My question - should I have a NT member server at the remote site with
> > authenication being performed over the 64k line with the PDC at HQ ? I
> > assume this would also mean all mails being forwarded to the PDC. With
> > mailboxes being constantly checked how fast would this be? At logon time
> do
> > they go away and make a cup of tea due to the time it is going to take
to
> > log in ? Proxy I would try to keep local on the NT member server.  I
would
> > normally install a SBS system in the branch office and use some form of
> mail
> > forwarding to transfer mail between the two, but I know that you cannot
> have
> > a trust relationship between two SBS domains, and this would stop me
from
> > being able to use the leased line, right ? Do I need to go to full
> > BackOffice for both sites ?

> > Sorry if I am rambling a bit; any adive would be gratefully received.

> > Regards
> > Mike.

 
 
 

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--
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