Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Jim Kell » Thu, 24 May 2001 07:25:04



Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?

Can anyone recommend fulltime modem ISPs that are reasonably priced in
Australia with good backup support for SBS issues? (no broadband in this
area).

tia

Jim Kelly

 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Ian Welc » Thu, 24 May 2001 08:28:00


Jim,

I have several installations that use Ozemail (UUNET) with full time static
IP modem connections. AFAIK, SBS aware ISPs applied to earlier versions of
SBS, and not to 4.5 or later.

I'm not to sure about reasonably priced, but my customers pay around $300
per month.

HTH,
Ian


> Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?

> Can anyone recommend fulltime modem ISPs that are reasonably priced in
> Australia with good backup support for SBS issues? (no broadband in this
> area).

> tia

> Jim Kelly



 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Gary Karasi » Thu, 24 May 2001 08:57:57


ICW in 4.5 can work with any ISPs, but not automatically. You need to
have some info (that you can get from the ISP). There's a form you can
open when you go through the ICW that will tell you what info you'll
need.

GaryK


> Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?

> Can anyone recommend fulltime modem ISPs that are reasonably priced in
> Australia with good backup support for SBS issues? (no broadband in this
> area).

> tia

> Jim Kelly


 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Jim Kell » Thu, 24 May 2001 12:15:34


Most ISPs seem happy to offer 15 or so mailboxes with their accounts. I am
confused with all of the options.

If we didn't have exchange, then all we would need is these mailboxes and a
router. If the client wants the ISP to host their website (and hence their
domain name) what options do we choose in SBS ICW? Do we need the Pop3
Connector installed?

Hope someone can see why I am confused and put me straight! Too many options
. .

We have a router - currently connected to the hub - and have used Exchange
for internal mail only to this stage. Happy to connect it to a 2nd server
nic if necessary but prefer to let 'sleeping dogs lie'.

Cheers,

Jim


> ICW in 4.5 can work with any ISPs, but not automatically. You need to
> have some info (that you can get from the ISP). There's a form you can
> open when you go through the ICW that will tell you what info you'll
> need.

> GaryK


> > Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?

> > Can anyone recommend fulltime modem ISPs that are reasonably priced in
> > Australia with good backup support for SBS issues? (no broadband in this
> > area).

> > tia

> > Jim Kelly


 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Ian Welc » Thu, 24 May 2001 13:36:51


Jim,


If the router is connected to the hub, and the hub is on the LAN, then without some other form of firewall, your customers site is wide open to attack.

So, do you have a static IP for the Internet connection ?

Is the SBS multi-homed. If not, can you add a second NIC to it ?. There are many Q articles on http://search.support.microsoft.com/kb/c.asp?fr=0&sa=gn&lng=eng to help with this process. Or of course many people here can help.

If you don't have a static IP, then, yes the easiest way is with a POP3 connector. The best (my opinion) is from www.popbeamer.com. This connector then downloads from the ISP and passes the mail to Exchange. IMHO, not as good as using SMTP/Exchange.

A second NIC connected to the Router. Normally a matter of setting up the Router with Logon/Passwords from ISP, and then running ICW to enable packet filtering and proxy ports. All you really need at the beginning is SMTP (port 25) open, and away you go.

HTH,
Ian


> Most ISPs seem happy to offer 15 or so mailboxes with their accounts. I am
> confused with all of the options.

> If we didn't have exchange, then all we would need is these mailboxes and a
> router. If the client wants the ISP to host their website (and hence their
> domain name) what options do we choose in SBS ICW? Do we need the Pop3
> Connector installed?

> Hope someone can see why I am confused and put me straight! Too many options
> . .

> We have a router - currently connected to the hub - and have used Exchange
> for internal mail only to this stage. Happy to connect it to a 2nd server
> nic if necessary but prefer to let 'sleeping dogs lie'.

> Cheers,

> Jim



> > ICW in 4.5 can work with any ISPs, but not automatically. You need to
> > have some info (that you can get from the ISP). There's a form you can
> > open when you go through the ICW that will tell you what info you'll
> > need.

> > GaryK


> > > Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?

> > > Can anyone recommend fulltime modem ISPs that are reasonably priced in
> > > Australia with good backup support for SBS issues? (no broadband in this
> > > area).

> > > tia

> > > Jim Kelly


 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by SuperGumb » Thu, 24 May 2001 17:24:47


what speed connection required ?

I have dialup, ISDN (routed), permanent modem (tks Jan, RRAS was the
solution, it's settled down nicely) and routed broadband through a variety
of aussie ISP's.


Quote:>Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?

 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Mal Osborn » Thu, 24 May 2001 20:53:32


I have done OK with UUNET, (Aust Wide) as well as IINET (Perth).  I
recommend installing and setting up RRAS and a persistent connection for any
24x7 modem connection, it works a lot better. I don't normally use the ICW,
I just do that bit manually.  Most ISPs will not give you any help if you
have an issue with SBS, but some are better than others.

--
Mal Osborne
MCSE MVP Mensa


> Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?

> Can anyone recommend fulltime modem ISPs that are reasonably priced in
> Australia with good backup support for SBS issues? (no broadband in this
> area).

> tia

> Jim Kelly


 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Gary Karasi » Fri, 25 May 2001 03:34:00


You MAY use the POP3 connector, but you don't have to. You have these
options: Use Exchange for your email by having the ISP set up an MX
record (usually the IP address of your Exchange server); use the POP3
connector; use Outlook Express and set up accounts on each workstation
to connect to that user's ISP/mailbox; use Outlook and add the Internet
mail connector to each user's Outlook profile, configuring the connector
to connect to that user's ISP/Mailbox. With this last, you'd use
Exchange for internal email and the connector for external, and the user
would see both internal and external email in the Outlook inbox. There's
no "right" way to do it. Most people here prefer the simplicity of the
first option. You set up the Exchange Internet Mail Connector, give the
ISP the IP address of your exchange server, the ISP sets up an MX record
to point to the server, and external email is routed via the ISP
directly to your Exchange server, which Exchange then distributes to the
clients. Different people go different ways. For a variety of reasons, I
use a combination of the POP3 connector and
Outlook/internet-mail-connector.

GaryK


> Most ISPs seem happy to offer 15 or so mailboxes with their accounts. I am
> confused with all of the options.

> If we didn't have exchange, then all we would need is these mailboxes and a
> router. If the client wants the ISP to host their website (and hence their
> domain name) what options do we choose in SBS ICW? Do we need the Pop3
> Connector installed?

> Hope someone can see why I am confused and put me straight! Too many options
> . .

> We have a router - currently connected to the hub - and have used Exchange
> for internal mail only to this stage. Happy to connect it to a 2nd server
> nic if necessary but prefer to let 'sleeping dogs lie'.

> Cheers,

> Jim



> > ICW in 4.5 can work with any ISPs, but not automatically. You need to
> > have some info (that you can get from the ISP). There's a form you can
> > open when you go through the ICW that will tell you what info you'll
> > need.

> > GaryK


> > > Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?

> > > Can anyone recommend fulltime modem ISPs that are reasonably priced in
> > > Australia with good backup support for SBS issues? (no broadband in this
> > > area).

> > > tia

> > > Jim Kelly


 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Jim Kell » Fri, 25 May 2001 09:44:23


Great thanks. What is involved with installing and setting up RRAS?

Jim


> I have done OK with UUNET, (Aust Wide) as well as IINET (Perth).  I
> recommend installing and setting up RRAS and a persistent connection for
any
> 24x7 modem connection, it works a lot better. I don't normally use the
ICW,
> I just do that bit manually.  Most ISPs will not give you any help if you
> have an issue with SBS, but some are better than others.

> --
> Mal Osborne
> MCSE MVP Mensa



> > Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?

> > Can anyone recommend fulltime modem ISPs that are reasonably priced in
> > Australia with good backup support for SBS issues? (no broadband in this
> > area).

> > tia

> > Jim Kelly


 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Jim Kell » Fri, 25 May 2001 09:45:04


56k modem would be fine.


> what speed connection required ?

> I have dialup, ISDN (routed), permanent modem (tks Jan, RRAS was the
> solution, it's settled down nicely) and routed broadband through a variety
> of aussie ISP's.



> >Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?

 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Jim Kell » Fri, 25 May 2001 10:14:09


Thanks Gary - so many options - no wonder it is so confusing.

The method that I have been trying is one that you mentioned. At each user's
pc I add an internet connection to the Outlook Profile. If I can get that to
work then I'll be happy. Any tricks to this? I suspect that (when I was on
site last) their ISP may have been having hassles - making it hard for me to
get a win . . . Expect to be there again in about six hours so will try
again.

Jim


| You MAY use the POP3 connector, but you don't have to. You have these
| options: Use Exchange for your email by having the ISP set up an MX
| record (usually the IP address of your Exchange server); use the POP3
| connector; use Outlook Express and set up accounts on each workstation
| to connect to that user's ISP/mailbox; use Outlook and add the Internet
| mail connector to each user's Outlook profile, configuring the connector
| to connect to that user's ISP/Mailbox. With this last, you'd use
| Exchange for internal email and the connector for external, and the user
| would see both internal and external email in the Outlook inbox. There's
| no "right" way to do it. Most people here prefer the simplicity of the
| first option. You set up the Exchange Internet Mail Connector, give the
| ISP the IP address of your exchange server, the ISP sets up an MX record
| to point to the server, and external email is routed via the ISP
| directly to your Exchange server, which Exchange then distributes to the
| clients. Different people go different ways. For a variety of reasons, I
| use a combination of the POP3 connector and
| Outlook/internet-mail-connector.
|
| GaryK
|
| >
| > Most ISPs seem happy to offer 15 or so mailboxes with their accounts. I
am
| > confused with all of the options.
| >
| > If we didn't have exchange, then all we would need is these mailboxes
and a
| > router. If the client wants the ISP to host their website (and hence
their
| > domain name) what options do we choose in SBS ICW? Do we need the Pop3
| > Connector installed?
| >
| > Hope someone can see why I am confused and put me straight! Too many
options
| > . .
| >
| > We have a router - currently connected to the hub - and have used
Exchange
| > for internal mail only to this stage. Happy to connect it to a 2nd
server
| > nic if necessary but prefer to let 'sleeping dogs lie'.
| >
| > Cheers,
| >
| > Jim
| >


| > > ICW in 4.5 can work with any ISPs, but not automatically. You need to
| > > have some info (that you can get from the ISP). There's a form you can
| > > open when you go through the ICW that will tell you what info you'll
| > > need.
| > >
| > > GaryK
| > >

| > > >
| > > > Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware"
ISPs?
| > > >
| > > > Can anyone recommend fulltime modem ISPs that are reasonably priced
in
| > > > Australia with good backup support for SBS issues? (no broadband in
this
| > > > area).
| > > >
| > > > tia
| > > >
| > > > Jim Kelly

 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Jim Kell » Fri, 25 May 2001 10:30:02


Thanks very much for your kind help.

This particular SBS site has made do with a simple pop3 account to a very low cost ISP via a modem attached to one workstation - using Outlook Express. So no fixed IP.

My problem is that now they want several users to be able to browse and have their own email accounts. They expect the monthly cost to be very low - and really have low expectations of browsing and email traffic. It doesn't help that it is common knowledge that this occurs in many home networks without a problem . .

Unlimited time connections cost between A$20 and A$300/mth. Even BigPond can be $25/mth. I am puzzled that a router/modem cannot be easily added to the SBS nework to connect to a low cost account - and utilise the ISP's low cost email mailboxes? What am I missing? Is the NAT security offered by a router really that inadequate?

How does the 'pop3 connector' method differ from 'adding an internet mailbox (?) to each users outlook profile' at their PC? The later seems very easy to do - even though I haven't had any luck getting it to work reliably yet . . . This is a simple site, one user per PC, one PC per user (most PCs WinNT4sp6a).

Thanks,

Jim


  Jim,


  If the router is connected to the hub, and the hub is on the LAN, then without some other form of firewall, your customers site is wide open to attack.

  So, do you have a static IP for the Internet connection ?

  Is the SBS multi-homed. If not, can you add a second NIC to it ?. There are many Q articles on http://search.support.microsoft.com/kb/c.asp?fr=0&sa=gn&lng=eng to help with this process. Or of course many people here can help.

  If you don't have a static IP, then, yes the easiest way is with a POP3 connector. The best (my opinion) is from www.popbeamer.com. This connector then downloads from the ISP and passes the mail to Exchange. IMHO, not as good as using SMTP/Exchange.

  A second NIC connected to the Router. Normally a matter of setting up the Router with Logon/Passwords from ISP, and then running ICW to enable packet filtering and proxy ports. All you really need at the beginning is SMTP (port 25) open, and away you go.

  HTH,
  Ian


  > Most ISPs seem happy to offer 15 or so mailboxes with their accounts. I am
  > confused with all of the options.
  >
  > If we didn't have exchange, then all we would need is these mailboxes and a
  > router. If the client wants the ISP to host their website (and hence their
  > domain name) what options do we choose in SBS ICW? Do we need the Pop3
  > Connector installed?
  >
  > Hope someone can see why I am confused and put me straight! Too many options
  > . .
  >
  > We have a router - currently connected to the hub - and have used Exchange
  > for internal mail only to this stage. Happy to connect it to a 2nd server
  > nic if necessary but prefer to let 'sleeping dogs lie'.
  >
  > Cheers,
  >
  > Jim
  >
  >
  >


  > > ICW in 4.5 can work with any ISPs, but not automatically. You need to
  > > have some info (that you can get from the ISP). There's a form you can
  > > open when you go through the ICW that will tell you what info you'll
  > > need.
  > >
  > > GaryK
  > >

  > > >
  > > > Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?
  > > >
  > > > Can anyone recommend fulltime modem ISPs that are reasonably priced in
  > > > Australia with good backup support for SBS issues? (no broadband in this
  > > > area).
  > > >
  > > > tia
  > > >
  > > > Jim Kelly

  >
  >

 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Steve Foste » Fri, 25 May 2001 22:40:30


The advantage of the POP connector is that you only have to configure it once (usually), and you only need a single mailbox with your isp (which is usually cheaper than multiple boxes). Installing the Internet Email option in Outlook requires at least 1 configuration session per user.

It also means that the mail is then held in exchange, rather than on the individual user's pc - much easier to back up the server than lots of workstations. Additionally, if the user breaks their copy of outlook, all the email is safe.

Steve Foster

  Thanks very much for your kind help.

  This particular SBS site has made do with a simple pop3 account to a very low cost ISP via a modem attached to one workstation - using Outlook Express. So no fixed IP.

  My problem is that now they want several users to be able to browse and have their own email accounts. They expect the monthly cost to be very low - and really have low expectations of browsing and email traffic. It doesn't help that it is common knowledge that this occurs in many home networks without a problem . .

  Unlimited time connections cost between A$20 and A$300/mth. Even BigPond can be $25/mth. I am puzzled that a router/modem cannot be easily added to the SBS nework to connect to a low cost account - and utilise the ISP's low cost email mailboxes? What am I missing? Is the NAT security offered by a router really that inadequate?

  How does the 'pop3 connector' method differ from 'adding an internet mailbox (?) to each users outlook profile' at their PC? The later seems very easy to do - even though I haven't had any luck getting it to work reliably yet . . . This is a simple site, one user per PC, one PC per user (most PCs WinNT4sp6a).

  Thanks,

  Jim


    Jim,


    If the router is connected to the hub, and the hub is on the LAN, then without some other form of firewall, your customers site is wide open to attack.

    So, do you have a static IP for the Internet connection ?

    Is the SBS multi-homed. If not, can you add a second NIC to it ?. There are many Q articles on http://search.support.microsoft.com/kb/c.asp?fr=0&sa=gn&lng=eng to help with this process. Or of course many people here can help.

    If you don't have a static IP, then, yes the easiest way is with a POP3 connector. The best (my opinion) is from www.popbeamer.com. This connector then downloads from the ISP and passes the mail to Exchange. IMHO, not as good as using SMTP/Exchange.

    A second NIC connected to the Router. Normally a matter of setting up the Router with Logon/Passwords from ISP, and then running ICW to enable packet filtering and proxy ports. All you really need at the beginning is SMTP (port 25) open, and away you go.

    HTH,
    Ian


    > Most ISPs seem happy to offer 15 or so mailboxes with their accounts. I am
    > confused with all of the options.
    >
    > If we didn't have exchange, then all we would need is these mailboxes and a
    > router. If the client wants the ISP to host their website (and hence their
    > domain name) what options do we choose in SBS ICW? Do we need the Pop3
    > Connector installed?
    >
    > Hope someone can see why I am confused and put me straight! Too many options
    > . .
    >
    > We have a router - currently connected to the hub - and have used Exchange
    > for internal mail only to this stage. Happy to connect it to a 2nd server
    > nic if necessary but prefer to let 'sleeping dogs lie'.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Jim
    >
    >
    >


    > > ICW in 4.5 can work with any ISPs, but not automatically. You need to
    > > have some info (that you can get from the ISP). There's a form you can
    > > open when you go through the ICW that will tell you what info you'll
    > > need.
    > >
    > > GaryK
    > >

    > > >
    > > > Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?
    > > >
    > > > Can anyone recommend fulltime modem ISPs that are reasonably priced in
    > > > Australia with good backup support for SBS issues? (no broadband in this
    > > > area).
    > > >
    > > > tia
    > > >
    > > > Jim Kelly

    >
    >

 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by Jim Kell » Sat, 26 May 2001 08:42:02


BIG Thanks Steve - that's the clearest explanation I could ever have asked for. I had assumed that the Internet Mail would be stored with the internal mail - in Exchange - on the server!

Jim.

  The advantage of the POP connector is that you only have to configure it once (usually), and you only need a single mailbox with your isp (which is usually cheaper than multiple boxes). Installing the Internet Email option in Outlook requires at least 1 configuration session per user.

  It also means that the mail is then held in exchange, rather than on the individual user's pc - much easier to back up the server than lots of workstations. Additionally, if the user breaks their copy of outlook, all the email is safe.

  Steve Foster

    Thanks very much for your kind help.

    This particular SBS site has made do with a simple pop3 account to a very low cost ISP via a modem attached to one workstation - using Outlook Express. So no fixed IP.

    My problem is that now they want several users to be able to browse and have their own email accounts. They expect the monthly cost to be very low - and really have low expectations of browsing and email traffic. It doesn't help that it is common knowledge that this occurs in many home networks without a problem . .

    Unlimited time connections cost between A$20 and A$300/mth. Even BigPond can be $25/mth. I am puzzled that a router/modem cannot be easily added to the SBS nework to connect to a low cost account - and utilise the ISP's low cost email mailboxes? What am I missing? Is the NAT security offered by a router really that inadequate?

    How does the 'pop3 connector' method differ from 'adding an internet mailbox (?) to each users outlook profile' at their PC? The later seems very easy to do - even though I haven't had any luck getting it to work reliably yet . . . This is a simple site, one user per PC, one PC per user (most PCs WinNT4sp6a).

    Thanks,

    Jim


      Jim,


      If the router is connected to the hub, and the hub is on the LAN, then without some other form of firewall, your customers site is wide open to attack.

      So, do you have a static IP for the Internet connection ?

      Is the SBS multi-homed. If not, can you add a second NIC to it ?. There are many Q articles on http://search.support.microsoft.com/kb/c.asp?fr=0&sa=gn&lng=eng to help with this process. Or of course many people here can help.

      If you don't have a static IP, then, yes the easiest way is with a POP3 connector. The best (my opinion) is from www.popbeamer.com. This connector then downloads from the ISP and passes the mail to Exchange. IMHO, not as good as using SMTP/Exchange.

      A second NIC connected to the Router. Normally a matter of setting up the Router with Logon/Passwords from ISP, and then running ICW to enable packet filtering and proxy ports. All you really need at the beginning is SMTP (port 25) open, and away you go.

      HTH,
      Ian


      > Most ISPs seem happy to offer 15 or so mailboxes with their accounts. I am
      > confused with all of the options.
      >
      > If we didn't have exchange, then all we would need is these mailboxes and a
      > router. If the client wants the ISP to host their website (and hence their
      > domain name) what options do we choose in SBS ICW? Do we need the Pop3
      > Connector installed?
      >
      > Hope someone can see why I am confused and put me straight! Too many options
      > . .
      >
      > We have a router - currently connected to the hub - and have used Exchange
      > for internal mail only to this stage. Happy to connect it to a 2nd server
      > nic if necessary but prefer to let 'sleeping dogs lie'.
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      > Jim
      >
      >
      >


      > > ICW in 4.5 can work with any ISPs, but not automatically. You need to
      > > have some info (that you can get from the ISP). There's a form you can
      > > open when you go through the ICW that will tell you what info you'll
      > > need.
      > >
      > > GaryK
      > >

      > > >
      > > > Seems that the ICW in v4.5 can only work easily with "SBS aware" ISPs?
      > > >
      > > > Can anyone recommend fulltime modem ISPs that are reasonably priced in
      > > > Australia with good backup support for SBS issues? (no broadband in this
      > > > area).
      > > >
      > > > tia
      > > >
      > > > Jim Kelly

      >
      >

 
 
 

Mal, etc: Any known good "SBS aware" ISPs in Australia?

Post by SuperGumb » Sat, 26 May 2001 12:17:57


remove RAS
restart.
add RRAS (downloadable from MS),,, DO NOT ALLOW THE RRAS INSTALL TO RESTART
THE MACHINE. (actually, you can, it just chucks a wobbly because some of the
file versions are out of date).
Apply SP6a.
restart.

in routing and remote access admin (RRAS equivalent to RAS Admin) create a
demand dial router to your newly activated BigPond Direct permanent modem
(including setting the connection credentials). In the 'static routes'
section of RRAS, create a default route to 0.0.0.0/0 pointing to the demand
dial interface, EVEN IF THIS APPEARS TO BE UNNECESSARY.

Tell BPD to assume delegation of your domain and act as 'backup' SMTP (if
your server goes down, theirs collects mail until it sees you back online)
to your Exchange server. (BPD don't have to assume delegation, your current
authority can probably provide the same facility, it's just a little neater
if your ISP and delegate authority are the same organisation,,, not so much
'it's their fault' if something goes wrong)

RUN console ICW and tell it you are using a router. (functionally, you are,
it's just that the router is actually implemented in software on the same
box)

Remove POP connector unless you have a need for it. Actually, it sounds, in
your other posts, that you will still want the POP connector, adjust it
suitably. I also think you would be _MUCH_ better served collecting any
additional POP accounts via Exch/POPc than adding individual pop account
details to user desktops.

I'm not sure if that's everything, but it should get you most of the way
there.

cigar, port, smile.


>Great thanks. What is involved with installing and setting up RRAS?

 
 
 

1. "Server=domain" and "add user script": How to know group?

Hi,

To create Unix accounts on the fly on a Samba server set as
security=domain, I guess I could use "useradd %u", but how do I set
the user to the right group?

Do NT DCs return the different groups to which the user belongs on the
DC, ie. I could run sthing like "useradd -g %g -G %G %u"?

=> Generally speaking, is there a fool-proof way to keep user/group
DBs in sync between NT DCs and Samba server, so that all NT users and
groups are available on all Samba servers (and removed when deleted on
the NT PDC)?

Thx
FF.

2. CHAOS 1/2 meg version

3. Problems with special characters like ("?","ΓΌ","?","?",aso.)

4. Email NSC

5. Event 2021 "Unable to allocate work item" etc etc

6. TECHNICAL vs COMPOUND primary key

7. ISP- But not just "ANY" ISP!

8. Irix 5.3 on Indigo

9. "reverse" "Upgrade" - Windows 2000Srv to SBS Server..?

10. How to add the "add-ins"?

11. From "Start" "Run" enter "IPCONFIG" window fails to stay up. Anyone know why?

12. UK SBS "Friendly" ISPS