BSOD listing on the Net?

BSOD listing on the Net?

Post by Susan Bradley, CPA/CITP aka E-BIT » Wed, 31 Jan 2001 09:39:02



Anyone know if there is a web site that lists all the blue screen of
death codes?

Susan B.

I'm sorry...I couldn't resist this one....

Microsoft To Allow Changing Of Blue Screen Of Death

In a surprise announcement today, Microsoft President Steve Ballmer
revealed that the Redmond-based company will allow computer resellers
and end-users to customize the appearance of the Blue Screen of Death
(BSOD), the screen that displays when the Windows operating system
crashes. The move comes as the result of numerous focus groups and
customer surveys done by Microsoft. Thousands of Microsoft customers
were asked, "What do you spend the most time doing on your
computer?" A surprising number of respondents said, "Staring at a Blue
Screen of Death." At 54 percent, it was the top answer, beating the
second place answer "Downloading XXXScans" by an easy 12 points. "We
immediately recognized this as a great opportunity for ourselves, our
channel partners, and especially our customers," explained the e*d
Ballmer to a room full of reporters. Immense video displays were used to

show images of the new customizable BSOD screen side-by-side with the
older static version. Users can select from a collection of "BSOD
Themes," allowing them to instead have a Mauve Screen of Death or even a

Paisley Screen of Death. Graphics and multimedia content can now be
incorporated into the screen, making the BSOD the perfect conduit for
delivering product information and entertainment to Windows users. The
BSOD is by far the most recognized feature of the Windows operating
system, and as a result, Microsoft has historically insisted on total
control over its
look and feel. This recent departure from that policy reflects
Microsoft's recognition of the Windows desktop itself as the "ultimate
information portal." By default, the new BSOD will be configured to show

a random selection of Microsoft product information whenever the system
crashes. Microsoft channel partners can negotiate with Microsoft for the

right to customize the BSOD on systems they ship. Major computer
resellers such as Compaq, Gateway, and Dell are already lining up for
premier placement on the new and improved BSOD. Ballmer concluded by
getting a dig in against the Open Source community. "This just goes to
show that Microsoft continues to innovate at a much faster pace than
open source. I have yet to see any evidence that Linux even has a BSOD,
let alone a customizable one."

 
 
 

BSOD listing on the Net?

Post by Grey Lancaster [MS MVP SBS » Thu, 01 Feb 2001 09:52:14


FWIW, W2k does not BSOD
It has been renamed, but I have nver had one (yet) so I do not know the new
name.

The coolest thing is there is a BSOD screensaver taht will fool the best NT
guru.

--
Happy SBS'ing

Grey
MVP SBS
Thanks for using MS #1 newsgroup  microsoft.public.backoffice.smallbiz

http://www.veryComputer.com/ FAQ's/Links etc
http://www.veryComputer.com/;SBS Listserve



Quote:> Anyone know if there is a web site that lists all the blue screen of
> death codes?

> Susan B.

> I'm sorry...I couldn't resist this one....

> Microsoft To Allow Changing Of Blue Screen Of Death

> In a surprise announcement today, Microsoft President Steve Ballmer
> revealed that the Redmond-based company will allow computer resellers
> and end-users to customize the appearance of the Blue Screen of Death
> (BSOD), the screen that displays when the Windows operating system
> crashes. The move comes as the result of numerous focus groups and
> customer surveys done by Microsoft. Thousands of Microsoft customers
> were asked, "What do you spend the most time doing on your
> computer?" A surprising number of respondents said, "Staring at a Blue
> Screen of Death." At 54 percent, it was the top answer, beating the
> second place answer "Downloading XXXScans" by an easy 12 points. "We
> immediately recognized this as a great opportunity for ourselves, our
> channel partners, and especially our customers," explained the e*d
> Ballmer to a room full of reporters. Immense video displays were used to

> show images of the new customizable BSOD screen side-by-side with the
> older static version. Users can select from a collection of "BSOD
> Themes," allowing them to instead have a Mauve Screen of Death or even a

> Paisley Screen of Death. Graphics and multimedia content can now be
> incorporated into the screen, making the BSOD the perfect conduit for
> delivering product information and entertainment to Windows users. The
> BSOD is by far the most recognized feature of the Windows operating
> system, and as a result, Microsoft has historically insisted on total
> control over its
> look and feel. This recent departure from that policy reflects
> Microsoft's recognition of the Windows desktop itself as the "ultimate
> information portal." By default, the new BSOD will be configured to show

> a random selection of Microsoft product information whenever the system
> crashes. Microsoft channel partners can negotiate with Microsoft for the

> right to customize the BSOD on systems they ship. Major computer
> resellers such as Compaq, Gateway, and Dell are already lining up for
> premier placement on the new and improved BSOD. Ballmer concluded by
> getting a dig in against the Open Source community. "This just goes to
> show that Microsoft continues to innovate at a much faster pace than
> open source. I have yet to see any evidence that Linux even has a BSOD,
> let alone a customizable one."


 
 
 

BSOD listing on the Net?

Post by Grey Lancaster [MS MVP SBS » Thu, 01 Feb 2001 09:54:15


Oh, if you were serious, there are several KB's that help troubleshoot stop
etc BSOD errors.  But in my experience they are always hardware related with
the drivers for the hardware being a dsitant second, adaptec as an example

--
Happy SBS'ing

Grey
MVP SBS
Thanks for using MS #1 newsgroup  microsoft.public.backoffice.smallbiz

http://www.veryComputer.com/ FAQ's/Links etc
http://www.veryComputer.com/;SBS Listserve



Quote:> Anyone know if there is a web site that lists all the blue screen of
> death codes?

> Susan B.

> I'm sorry...I couldn't resist this one....

> Microsoft To Allow Changing Of Blue Screen Of Death

> In a surprise announcement today, Microsoft President Steve Ballmer
> revealed that the Redmond-based company will allow computer resellers
> and end-users to customize the appearance of the Blue Screen of Death
> (BSOD), the screen that displays when the Windows operating system
> crashes. The move comes as the result of numerous focus groups and
> customer surveys done by Microsoft. Thousands of Microsoft customers
> were asked, "What do you spend the most time doing on your
> computer?" A surprising number of respondents said, "Staring at a Blue
> Screen of Death." At 54 percent, it was the top answer, beating the
> second place answer "Downloading XXXScans" by an easy 12 points. "We
> immediately recognized this as a great opportunity for ourselves, our
> channel partners, and especially our customers," explained the e*d
> Ballmer to a room full of reporters. Immense video displays were used to

> show images of the new customizable BSOD screen side-by-side with the
> older static version. Users can select from a collection of "BSOD
> Themes," allowing them to instead have a Mauve Screen of Death or even a

> Paisley Screen of Death. Graphics and multimedia content can now be
> incorporated into the screen, making the BSOD the perfect conduit for
> delivering product information and entertainment to Windows users. The
> BSOD is by far the most recognized feature of the Windows operating
> system, and as a result, Microsoft has historically insisted on total
> control over its
> look and feel. This recent departure from that policy reflects
> Microsoft's recognition of the Windows desktop itself as the "ultimate
> information portal." By default, the new BSOD will be configured to show

> a random selection of Microsoft product information whenever the system
> crashes. Microsoft channel partners can negotiate with Microsoft for the

> right to customize the BSOD on systems they ship. Major computer
> resellers such as Compaq, Gateway, and Dell are already lining up for
> premier placement on the new and improved BSOD. Ballmer concluded by
> getting a dig in against the Open Source community. "This just goes to
> show that Microsoft continues to innovate at a much faster pace than
> open source. I have yet to see any evidence that Linux even has a BSOD,
> let alone a customizable one."

 
 
 

BSOD listing on the Net?

Post by Marc » Wed, 31 Jan 2001 19:57:39


Hello,

Well, I have the Windows NT Resource Kit 3.51 from Microsoft Press and it contains the Windows NT Messages including all BSOD error listings + explanation. If you learn this by heart, you will become a wizzkit ;-)

I am not sure if the Windows NT 4.0 Resource Kit contains this handy book, but I am sure there are others as well. I am still using the NT 3.51 Kit because explanations of malfunctioning hardware and stuff is still the same as in NT 4.0.

--
Regards,

Marco
MCSE, Exchange, NT


  Anyone know if there is a web site that lists all the blue screen of
  death codes?

  Susan B.

  I'm sorry...I couldn't resist this one....

  Microsoft To Allow Changing Of Blue Screen Of Death

  In a surprise announcement today, Microsoft President Steve Ballmer
  revealed that the Redmond-based company will allow computer resellers
  and end-users to customize the appearance of the Blue Screen of Death
  (BSOD), the screen that displays when the Windows operating system
  crashes. The move comes as the result of numerous focus groups and
  customer surveys done by Microsoft. Thousands of Microsoft customers
  were asked, "What do you spend the most time doing on your
  computer?" A surprising number of respondents said, "Staring at a Blue
  Screen of Death." At 54 percent, it was the top answer, beating the
  second place answer "Downloading XXXScans" by an easy 12 points. "We
  immediately recognized this as a great opportunity for ourselves, our
  channel partners, and especially our customers," explained the e*d
  Ballmer to a room full of reporters. Immense video displays were used to

  show images of the new customizable BSOD screen side-by-side with the
  older static version. Users can select from a collection of "BSOD
  Themes," allowing them to instead have a Mauve Screen of Death or even a

  Paisley Screen of Death. Graphics and multimedia content can now be
  incorporated into the screen, making the BSOD the perfect conduit for
  delivering product information and entertainment to Windows users. The
  BSOD is by far the most recognized feature of the Windows operating
  system, and as a result, Microsoft has historically insisted on total
  control over its
  look and feel. This recent departure from that policy reflects
  Microsoft's recognition of the Windows desktop itself as the "ultimate
  information portal." By default, the new BSOD will be configured to show

  a random selection of Microsoft product information whenever the system
  crashes. Microsoft channel partners can negotiate with Microsoft for the

  right to customize the BSOD on systems they ship. Major computer
  resellers such as Compaq, Gateway, and Dell are already lining up for
  premier placement on the new and improved BSOD. Ballmer concluded by
  getting a dig in against the Open Source community. "This just goes to
  show that Microsoft continues to innovate at a much faster pace than
  open source. I have yet to see any evidence that Linux even has a BSOD,
  let alone a customizable one."

 
 
 

BSOD listing on the Net?

Post by Mal Osborn » Wed, 31 Jan 2001 23:21:14


It's in Technet as well, but as I recall a bit hard to find.

--
Mal Osborne
MCSE MVP Mensa


  Hello,

  Well, I have the Windows NT Resource Kit 3.51 from Microsoft Press and it contains the Windows NT Messages including all BSOD error listings + explanation. If you learn this by heart, you will become a wizzkit ;-)

  I am not sure if the Windows NT 4.0 Resource Kit contains this handy book, but I am sure there are others as well. I am still using the NT 3.51 Kit because explanations of malfunctioning hardware and stuff is still the same as in NT 4.0.

  --
  Regards,

  Marco
  MCSE, Exchange, NT


    Anyone know if there is a web site that lists all the blue screen of
    death codes?

    Susan B.

    I'm sorry...I couldn't resist this one....

    Microsoft To Allow Changing Of Blue Screen Of Death

    In a surprise announcement today, Microsoft President Steve Ballmer
    revealed that the Redmond-based company will allow computer resellers
    and end-users to customize the appearance of the Blue Screen of Death
    (BSOD), the screen that displays when the Windows operating system
    crashes. The move comes as the result of numerous focus groups and
    customer surveys done by Microsoft. Thousands of Microsoft customers
    were asked, "What do you spend the most time doing on your
    computer?" A surprising number of respondents said, "Staring at a Blue
    Screen of Death." At 54 percent, it was the top answer, beating the
    second place answer "Downloading XXXScans" by an easy 12 points. "We
    immediately recognized this as a great opportunity for ourselves, our
    channel partners, and especially our customers," explained the e*d
    Ballmer to a room full of reporters. Immense video displays were used to

    show images of the new customizable BSOD screen side-by-side with the
    older static version. Users can select from a collection of "BSOD
    Themes," allowing them to instead have a Mauve Screen of Death or even a

    Paisley Screen of Death. Graphics and multimedia content can now be
    incorporated into the screen, making the BSOD the perfect conduit for
    delivering product information and entertainment to Windows users. The
    BSOD is by far the most recognized feature of the Windows operating
    system, and as a result, Microsoft has historically insisted on total
    control over its
    look and feel. This recent departure from that policy reflects
    Microsoft's recognition of the Windows desktop itself as the "ultimate
    information portal." By default, the new BSOD will be configured to show

    a random selection of Microsoft product information whenever the system
    crashes. Microsoft channel partners can negotiate with Microsoft for the

    right to customize the BSOD on systems they ship. Major computer
    resellers such as Compaq, Gateway, and Dell are already lining up for
    premier placement on the new and improved BSOD. Ballmer concluded by
    getting a dig in against the Open Source community. "This just goes to
    show that Microsoft continues to innovate at a much faster pace than
    open source. I have yet to see any evidence that Linux even has a BSOD,
    let alone a customizable one."

 
 
 

BSOD listing on the Net?

Post by Marc » Thu, 01 Feb 2001 04:37:34


That is right, but Susan is more interested in some kind of list.

--

Regards,

Marco
MCSE, NT, Exchange


  It's in Technet as well, but as I recall a bit hard to find.

  --
  Mal Osborne
  MCSE MVP Mensa


    Hello,

    Well, I have the Windows NT Resource Kit 3.51 from Microsoft Press and it contains the Windows NT Messages including all BSOD error listings + explanation. If you learn this by heart, you will become a wizzkit ;-)

    I am not sure if the Windows NT 4.0 Resource Kit contains this handy book, but I am sure there are others as well. I am still using the NT 3.51 Kit because explanations of malfunctioning hardware and stuff is still the same as in NT 4.0.

    --
    Regards,

    Marco
    MCSE, Exchange, NT


      Anyone know if there is a web site that lists all the blue screen of
      death codes?

      Susan B.

      I'm sorry...I couldn't resist this one....

      Microsoft To Allow Changing Of Blue Screen Of Death

      In a surprise announcement today, Microsoft President Steve Ballmer
      revealed that the Redmond-based company will allow computer resellers
      and end-users to customize the appearance of the Blue Screen of Death
      (BSOD), the screen that displays when the Windows operating system
      crashes. The move comes as the result of numerous focus groups and
      customer surveys done by Microsoft. Thousands of Microsoft customers
      were asked, "What do you spend the most time doing on your
      computer?" A surprising number of respondents said, "Staring at a Blue
      Screen of Death." At 54 percent, it was the top answer, beating the
      second place answer "Downloading XXXScans" by an easy 12 points. "We
      immediately recognized this as a great opportunity for ourselves, our
      channel partners, and especially our customers," explained the e*d
      Ballmer to a room full of reporters. Immense video displays were used to

      show images of the new customizable BSOD screen side-by-side with the
      older static version. Users can select from a collection of "BSOD
      Themes," allowing them to instead have a Mauve Screen of Death or even a

      Paisley Screen of Death. Graphics and multimedia content can now be
      incorporated into the screen, making the BSOD the perfect conduit for
      delivering product information and entertainment to Windows users. The
      BSOD is by far the most recognized feature of the Windows operating
      system, and as a result, Microsoft has historically insisted on total
      control over its
      look and feel. This recent departure from that policy reflects
      Microsoft's recognition of the Windows desktop itself as the "ultimate
      information portal." By default, the new BSOD will be configured to show

      a random selection of Microsoft product information whenever the system
      crashes. Microsoft channel partners can negotiate with Microsoft for the

      right to customize the BSOD on systems they ship. Major computer
      resellers such as Compaq, Gateway, and Dell are already lining up for
      premier placement on the new and improved BSOD. Ballmer concluded by
      getting a dig in against the Open Source community. "This just goes to
      show that Microsoft continues to innovate at a much faster pace than
      open source. I have yet to see any evidence that Linux even has a BSOD,
      let alone a customizable one."

 
 
 

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