Disaster recovery for a SBS2000 server

Disaster recovery for a SBS2000 server

Post by John Bema » Fri, 09 Nov 2001 02:02:17



What do you all reccomend as far as backing a SBS2000 server up with?

I'll explain a little more.  I have lots of data in various directories, I
don't need to worry about this.  I tape backup is always done every day, and
it is not the master copy of this data anyway.  The bits I am worried about
is the actuall install and setup of the server.  IP's, DNS, Exchange, Web
access, accounts, etc.  I only have 6 users on this server and no email is
stored on it, but I would like to store the mail on it.  The backup and
restore procedures aren't in place yet.

Is there a way to utilise a seperate server to 'mirror' this one, or can i
have a BDC to promote if needed.  I am looking for a relatively easy way to
get up and running again if this server was to die!

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks

John

 
 
 

Disaster recovery for a SBS2000 server

Post by Jeff Middleton [SBS-MVP » Fri, 09 Nov 2001 04:02:17


The best process is to run a tape drive on the SBS, do full and complete
backups EVERY day, don't do incremental, use a different tape everyday,
don't append.

As for what to backup, select the entire file space, System State, and
Exchange Information Store.  If you are using NT backup, you can backup
Exchange this way and have a fully recoverable backup set.  All of the
information to rebuild an SBS and recover it from bare metal is possible in
this manner.

A BDC doesn't really make this process easier than the tape backup above
would. A BDC would perhaps allow you to work on certain file access only
types of stuff, but the effort to convert a BDC to replace the SBS is by far
more technically complicated that restoring the SBS from tape.

For only 6 users, a second server would be pretty exceptional
overkill....and only justified in very unusual situations that have exposure
to loss of life or exceptional money loss for brief periods of time. For
instance, if you are a broker who could lose $10K in 30 minutes, you
qualify. Most businesses don't and if they did, SBS is really not the
product they should be using anyway.

No, there's not a way to mirror your server in a cost effective manner.


Quote:> What do you all reccomend as far as backing a SBS2000 server up with?

> I'll explain a little more.  I have lots of data in various directories, I
> don't need to worry about this.  I tape backup is always done every day,
and
> it is not the master copy of this data anyway.  The bits I am worried
about
> is the actuall install and setup of the server.  IP's, DNS, Exchange, Web
> access, accounts, etc.  I only have 6 users on this server and no email is
> stored on it, but I would like to store the mail on it.  The backup and
> restore procedures aren't in place yet.

> Is there a way to utilise a seperate server to 'mirror' this one, or can i
> have a BDC to promote if needed.  I am looking for a relatively easy way
to
> get up and running again if this server was to die!

> Any help is appreciated.

> Thanks

> John


 
 
 

Disaster recovery for a SBS2000 server

Post by John Bema » Fri, 09 Nov 2001 18:50:21


Thanks for this re-assurance Jeff.  If I could ask two more questions?

I have a lot of data/source code, at the moment this is backed up
seperately.  I would still prefer this to take place.  This way I can take
this offsite before leaving for home.  I assume that I can do this first in
my normal manner, then use the NTbackup wizard, choose selected files, tick
everything and then untick my data directory.

The second question is the obvious one, how would I do a restore from this
type of backup?  If my server was dead, I assume I would have to build
another SBS to do the restore on, would I not need all my settings for this,
or would I do anything here as they would get overwritten in the restore?

Thanks in advance to you all..

John



> The best process is to run a tape drive on the SBS, do full and complete
> backups EVERY day, don't do incremental, use a different tape everyday,
> don't append.

> As for what to backup, select the entire file space, System State, and
> Exchange Information Store.  If you are using NT backup, you can backup
> Exchange this way and have a fully recoverable backup set.  All of the
> information to rebuild an SBS and recover it from bare metal is possible
in
> this manner.

> A BDC doesn't really make this process easier than the tape backup above
> would. A BDC would perhaps allow you to work on certain file access only
> types of stuff, but the effort to convert a BDC to replace the SBS is by
far
> more technically complicated that restoring the SBS from tape.

> For only 6 users, a second server would be pretty exceptional
> overkill....and only justified in very unusual situations that have
exposure
> to loss of life or exceptional money loss for brief periods of time. For
> instance, if you are a broker who could lose $10K in 30 minutes, you
> qualify. Most businesses don't and if they did, SBS is really not the
> product they should be using anyway.

> No, there's not a way to mirror your server in a cost effective manner.



> > What do you all reccomend as far as backing a SBS2000 server up with?

> > I'll explain a little more.  I have lots of data in various directories,
I
> > don't need to worry about this.  I tape backup is always done every day,
> and
> > it is not the master copy of this data anyway.  The bits I am worried
> about
> > is the actuall install and setup of the server.  IP's, DNS, Exchange,
Web
> > access, accounts, etc.  I only have 6 users on this server and no email
is
> > stored on it, but I would like to store the mail on it.  The backup and
> > restore procedures aren't in place yet.

> > Is there a way to utilise a seperate server to 'mirror' this one, or can
i
> > have a BDC to promote if needed.  I am looking for a relatively easy way
> to
> > get up and running again if this server was to die!

> > Any help is appreciated.

> > Thanks

> > John

 
 
 

Disaster recovery for a SBS2000 server

Post by Dave Nickaso » Sat, 10 Nov 2001 00:46:57


We do full tape backups every night and take them off site the following
day.  However, when we have data that is absolutely critical, we back it up
to zip disks and take them offsite.  For example, if I'm in the middle of a
major project and the servers get stolen, I can work on my home computer
until the situation gets resolved.  These are mostly Office documents, etc.
We use a batch file to copy the files to the zip, but Iomega QuikSync
software is another option - it will copy any directories you select to any
media you select, automatically whenever you save a file.


> Thanks for this re-assurance Jeff.  If I could ask two more questions?

> I have a lot of data/source code, at the moment this is backed up
> seperately.  I would still prefer this to take place.  This way I can take
> this offsite before leaving for home.  I assume that I can do this first
in
> my normal manner, then use the NTbackup wizard, choose selected files,
tick
> everything and then untick my data directory.

> The second question is the obvious one, how would I do a restore from this
> type of backup?  If my server was dead, I assume I would have to build
> another SBS to do the restore on, would I not need all my settings for
this,
> or would I do anything here as they would get overwritten in the restore?

> Thanks in advance to you all..

> John



> > The best process is to run a tape drive on the SBS, do full and complete
> > backups EVERY day, don't do incremental, use a different tape everyday,
> > don't append.

> > As for what to backup, select the entire file space, System State, and
> > Exchange Information Store.  If you are using NT backup, you can backup
> > Exchange this way and have a fully recoverable backup set.  All of the
> > information to rebuild an SBS and recover it from bare metal is possible
> in
> > this manner.

> > A BDC doesn't really make this process easier than the tape backup above
> > would. A BDC would perhaps allow you to work on certain file access only
> > types of stuff, but the effort to convert a BDC to replace the SBS is by
> far
> > more technically complicated that restoring the SBS from tape.

> > For only 6 users, a second server would be pretty exceptional
> > overkill....and only justified in very unusual situations that have
> exposure
> > to loss of life or exceptional money loss for brief periods of time. For
> > instance, if you are a broker who could lose $10K in 30 minutes, you
> > qualify. Most businesses don't and if they did, SBS is really not the
> > product they should be using anyway.

> > No, there's not a way to mirror your server in a cost effective manner.



> > > What do you all reccomend as far as backing a SBS2000 server up with?

> > > I'll explain a little more.  I have lots of data in various
directories,
> I
> > > don't need to worry about this.  I tape backup is always done every
day,
> > and
> > > it is not the master copy of this data anyway.  The bits I am worried
> > about
> > > is the actuall install and setup of the server.  IP's, DNS, Exchange,
> Web
> > > access, accounts, etc.  I only have 6 users on this server and no
email
> is
> > > stored on it, but I would like to store the mail on it.  The backup
and
> > > restore procedures aren't in place yet.

> > > Is there a way to utilise a seperate server to 'mirror' this one, or
can
> i
> > > have a BDC to promote if needed.  I am looking for a relatively easy
way
> > to
> > > get up and running again if this server was to die!

> > > Any help is appreciated.

> > > Thanks

> > > John

 
 
 

Disaster recovery for a SBS2000 server

Post by Jeff Middleton [SBS-MVP » Sat, 10 Nov 2001 00:53:30


This is one of those questions where the answer is likely to blow you away
in scary documentation. Here's my description of the process of a bare metal
recovery:

On a clean drive, run the Win2K Server installation from the CD.
Install your tape drivers
Restore your tape
Do an authoritative restore (Q241594)

That in a generic sense works with any server, any backup program, any
backup devices. The only thing critical is that you must be performing
online backups of the Exchange, SQL and System State. Failing online backups
of these items, you have a huge problem and more complications. You get to
read!

The most reasonably short explanation of the process is these two KBs:

How to Move a Windows Installation to Different Hardware (Q249694)
Q241594 How to Perform an Authoritative Restore to a Domain Controller

For more robust info:

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/treeview/default.asp?url=/technet/pr...
ol/windows2000serv/support/recovery.asp

Windows NT4.0 and Windows 2000 Disaster Recovery and Backup and Restore
Procedures (Q287061)

  Q241594 How to Perform an Authoritative Restore to a Domain Controller
  Q216243 Impact of Authoritative Restore on Trusts and Computer Accounts

> Thanks for this re-assurance Jeff.  If I could ask two more questions?

> I have a lot of data/source code, at the moment this is backed up
> seperately.  I would still prefer this to take place.  This way I can take
> this offsite before leaving for home.  I assume that I can do this first
in
> my normal manner, then use the NTbackup wizard, choose selected files,
tick
> everything and then untick my data directory.

> The second question is the obvious one, how would I do a restore from this
> type of backup?  If my server was dead, I assume I would have to build
> another SBS to do the restore on, would I not need all my settings for
this,
> or would I do anything here as they would get overwritten in the restore?

> Thanks in advance to you all..

> John



> > The best process is to run a tape drive on the SBS, do full and complete
> > backups EVERY day, don't do incremental, use a different tape everyday,
> > don't append.

> > As for what to backup, select the entire file space, System State, and
> > Exchange Information Store.  If you are using NT backup, you can backup
> > Exchange this way and have a fully recoverable backup set.  All of the
> > information to rebuild an SBS and recover it from bare metal is possible
> in
> > this manner.

> > A BDC doesn't really make this process easier than the tape backup above
> > would. A BDC would perhaps allow you to work on certain file access only
> > types of stuff, but the effort to convert a BDC to replace the SBS is by
> far
> > more technically complicated that restoring the SBS from tape.

> > For only 6 users, a second server would be pretty exceptional
> > overkill....and only justified in very unusual situations that have
> exposure
> > to loss of life or exceptional money loss for brief periods of time. For
> > instance, if you are a broker who could lose $10K in 30 minutes, you
> > qualify. Most businesses don't and if they did, SBS is really not the
> > product they should be using anyway.

> > No, there's not a way to mirror your server in a cost effective manner.



> > > What do you all reccomend as far as backing a SBS2000 server up with?

> > > I'll explain a little more.  I have lots of data in various
directories,
> I
> > > don't need to worry about this.  I tape backup is always done every
day,
> > and
> > > it is not the master copy of this data anyway.  The bits I am worried
> > about
> > > is the actuall install and setup of the server.  IP's, DNS, Exchange,
> Web
> > > access, accounts, etc.  I only have 6 users on this server and no
email
> is
> > > stored on it, but I would like to store the mail on it.  The backup
and
> > > restore procedures aren't in place yet.

> > > Is there a way to utilise a seperate server to 'mirror' this one, or
can
> i
> > > have a BDC to promote if needed.  I am looking for a relatively easy
way
> > to
> > > get up and running again if this server was to die!

> > > Any help is appreciated.

> > > Thanks

> > > John

 
 
 

1. ArcServe and disaster recovery..its a disaster!

Anybody out there used ArcServe for SBS and tried a disaster recovery?

The reason I ask is because I bought it, tried the disaster recovery by
switching the SCSI cable over to an identical HD and then doing a DR.

So far it gets all the way to the end then reboots and tells me I have this
message...

"Windows NT could not start because of a computer disk hardware
configuration problem. Could not read from the selected boot disk. Check
boot path and disk hardware. Please check the NT documentation about
hardware disk configuration and your hardware reference manuals for
additional information.
"

This makes no sense as I have one partion of 4079mb and an unknown 16mb on
the main, (live HD) and I created an NTFS partion of 4079mb on the new,
identical, HD too.

How do I check the boot.ini if the damn thing doesn't go past this point???

Please don't tell me to use an NT boot disk 'cos that doesn't work!

Regards,

--
Vince


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