Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by Mike Hodki » Mon, 30 Jun 2003 22:32:43



I'm looking to learn 3d modeling and animation.  Lightwave certainly seems
impressive, but there are other packages such as 3dMax that seem good also.
Is Lightwave considered the "industry standard"?  Is it a clear winner as
far as stability (won't crash on Windows XP) and usability?  Since I'm on a
Lightwave forum, I might get a biased answer, but I'd like to hear the
optimistic side first.

thanks

 
 
 

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by Deuc » Mon, 30 Jun 2003 22:48:17


As a 'think of this' type of an answer -- theh question about "won't
crash" -- do you have any software that doesn't crash?  I know of a guy who
can crash notepad.

Usability - highly usable -- otherwise it wouldn't be used in so many
studios all over the world. There is some amazing amazing work being done
with LightWave, but this all comes down to one main question that you need
to ask of yourself.

Are you an artist?

If you are, then just look at features, and cost.  If you aren't an artist,
or if you don't have alot of cash, you might look at something like Blender
(that is back), or Animation Master so that if you get frustrated you won't
be broke in addition.

LightWave is a great piece of software, I use it daily and make my living
with it. Just like many of the people who frequent this group and many other
groups like it.

If you decide to get LightWave -- you won't be sorry, and if you need help?
We're always here.

~~Deuce
NewTek LightWave Engineering


: I'm looking to learn 3d modeling and animation.  Lightwave certainly seems
: impressive, but there are other packages such as 3dMax that seem good
also.
: Is Lightwave considered the "industry standard"?  Is it a clear winner as
: far as stability (won't crash on Windows XP) and usability?  Since I'm on
a
: Lightwave forum, I might get a biased answer, but I'd like to hear the
: optimistic side first.
:
: thanks
:
:

 
 
 

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by Stev » Mon, 30 Jun 2003 23:07:25



> I'm looking to learn 3d modeling and animation.  Lightwave certainly seems
> impressive, but there are other packages such as 3dMax that seem good
also.
> Is Lightwave considered the "industry standard"?

What industry? There are several niches where it is the most used, there are
other programs that are most used in the other niches.

Quote:> Is it a clear winner as
> far as stability (won't crash on Windows XP) and usability?

   Nope, I don't think any of the fx / animation programs can honistly claim
that. The updates come to close and the new things really are new things
that push the edge, leaving all the programs with bugs that need to be
worked around or lived with. Lightwave doesn't seem any better or worse then
any of the other high end / mid range programs.

Quote:>  Since I'm on a
> Lightwave forum, I might get a biased answer, but I'd like to hear the
> optimistic side first.

   Lightwave gets the job done for me and I like it's interface and workflow
best of all the programs I've used, just a personal thing. If you are
looking to do modeling and animation for a living, you should learn several
programs. They all have strong points and areas they are most used in.
 
 
 

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by John Jorda » Mon, 30 Jun 2003 23:19:35


I  have to agree that it gets the job done very nicely. I moved up to
Lightwave from trueSpace. I really liked using tS and could move about
quickly to get basic things done--tS is a nice app for what it does and
costs. But then I moved to Lightwave and it was the beginning of many many
more possibilities.
I was (at first) a little put off by the separate applications like Modeler
and Layout. Now I love them and could not imagine how I got it done before.
Why? Because I think it's made me become a better (read: more disciplined)
modeler by not jumping right into a project and not thinking it through
before committing computer resources to it. No doubt the learning curve is a
little steep--you've got to put the time in with the manual--there is just
no shortcuts to software this powerful. But I learn something new everyday
with Lightwave. And after awhile, the pieces do fall into place. But the
bottom line is that it is only limited by your imagination and time spent. I
know that's a cliche but it's true. Additionally, I can only speak for
myself but I've had very little crashing (usually it was traceble to my vid
drivers.)

Good luck in your choice of software!!

John


Quote:> I'm looking to learn 3d modeling and animation.  Lightwave certainly seems
> impressive, but there are other packages such as 3dMax that seem good
also.
> Is Lightwave considered the "industry standard"?  Is it a clear winner as
> far as stability (won't crash on Windows XP) and usability?  Since I'm on
a
> Lightwave forum, I might get a biased answer, but I'd like to hear the
> optimistic side first.

> thanks

 
 
 

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by CWCunningha » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 00:03:55


As an artist's tool, LW is very nice to have on the drawing table. As a
software implementation ... it's fast, extensible and fairly robust.
LW
Stability - 9 (Saving your work will never hurt you)
Bang for the buck - 9 (Maybe more)
Ease of use - 4
Documentation - 4
Customer Support (e-mail) - 2
Community Support - 9

If you're serious about this type of tool, LW is an excellent (pro quality)
choice. If this is for casual use, there are cheaper (hobby quality)
alternatives.

--
CWC
=========================
Beer
More than just a breakfast drink.
 --- Sign on a tavern wall ---
=========================


Quote:> I'm looking to learn 3d modeling and animation.  Lightwave certainly seems
> impressive, but there are other packages such as 3dMax that seem good
also.
> Is Lightwave considered the "industry standard"?  Is it a clear winner as
> far as stability (won't crash on Windows XP) and usability?  Since I'm on
a
> Lightwave forum, I might get a biased answer, but I'd like to hear the
> optimistic side first.

> thanks

 
 
 

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by Lawrence Bansbac » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 06:09:57


Actually, if you can live with its limitations, LightWave for hobbyists is
free in the form of LightWave 3D Discovery
Edition(http://www.newtek.com/discovery.html). But there are essentially
free versions of Maya, SoftImage, and (I believe) Houdini.

> If you're serious about this type of tool, LW is an excellent (pro
quality)
> choice. If this is for casual use, there are cheaper (hobby quality)
> alternatives.

> --
> CWC
> =========================
> Beer
> More than just a breakfast drink.
>  --- Sign on a tavern wall ---
> =========================



> > I'm looking to learn 3d modeling and animation.  Lightwave certainly
seems
> > impressive, but there are other packages such as 3dMax that seem good
> also.
> > Is Lightwave considered the "industry standard"?  Is it a clear winner
as
> > far as stability (won't crash on Windows XP) and usability?  Since I'm
on
> a
> > Lightwave forum, I might get a biased answer, but I'd like to hear the
> > optimistic side first.

> > thanks

 
 
 

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by Kevin F Stubb » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 07:27:12


Quote:> I'm looking to learn 3d modeling and animation.  Lightwave certainly seems
> impressive, but there are other packages such as 3dMax that seem good also.
> Is Lightwave considered the "industry standard"?

There are several Industry Standards when it comes to 3D software. Lightwave,
Maya, 3D Studio MAX and Softimage come to mind immediately. Regardless of their
relative merits, there is an additional factor you might like to add in to your
list of considerations which rarely if ever gets mentioned in these discussions.
If you choose to 'buy into' one of the four packages I've mentioned only one of
them allows you to change your mind later if you find that it really does not
suit you and that one is Lightwave. So you really do have to choose very
carefully before you spend your money.

Maya, 3D Studio and Softimage have non-transferable licenses, i.e. you CANNOT
resell them if you decide they are not for you. They do all have demo versions
with varying limitations which allow you to try them out before you buy
them....but you really need to spend 6 months or more on each to decide how well
you get along with them.

While it is quite possible that the one you settle on will suit you so you won't
be too bothered that you cannot sell it later, it is definitely worth including
this factor in your assessment of which one to throw your hard earned money at.

Cheers

Kevin F Stubbs
Kayef Select Limited

 
 
 

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by Paul Andrew » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 16:37:17




Quote:> > I'm looking to learn 3d modeling and animation.

snip

Quote:> There are several Industry Standards when it comes to 3D software.
Lightwave,
> Maya, 3D Studio MAX and Softimage come to mind immediately. Regardless of
their
> relative merits, there is an additional factor you might like to add in to
your
> list of considerations which rarely if ever gets mentioned in these
discussions.
> If you choose to 'buy into' one of the four packages I've mentioned only
one of
> them allows you to change your mind later if you find that it really does
not
> suit you and that one is Lightwave. So you really do have to choose very
> carefully before you spend your money.

snip

Quote:> While it is quite possible that the one you settle on will suit you so you
won't
> be too bothered that you cannot sell it later, it is definitely worth
including
> this factor in your assessment of which one to throw your hard earned
money at.

> Cheers

> Kevin F Stubbs
> Kayef Select Limited

Good points.

Another very important factor is the relative running costs. Some software
has yearly maintenance fees that cost as much as a lightwave seat and need
to be paid to be able to get upgrades.

Paul

 
 
 

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by Kevin F Stubb » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 17:09:28


Quote:> Another very important factor is the relative running costs.

Agreed :-))

Quote:> Some software
> has yearly maintenance fees that cost as much as a lightwave seat and need
> to be paid to be able to get upgrades.

Yearly maintenance fees are an option with Lightwave these days (at least here
in the UK) if you buy a full seat...but they aren't compulsory so you can still
opt to buy upgrades when/if you want them or when you can afford them rather
than automatically as soon as they are released.

Cheers

Kevin F Stubbs
Kayef Select Limited

 
 
 

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by Fish » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 19:48:02


also depends on if you want to get regular a job as a CG artist or
would like to work for your own company. If you want to get a job, work
for the movie industry or in games check out what software is mostly
used. As far as jobs in the movie undustry, you would have a better
chance getting a job with Maya and for games Max is used a lot. There
are just less jobs out there for people using Lightwave, although if you
have enough talent people will hire you no matter what you use.

grtz,

Fish
http://www.toonafish.nl


> I'm looking to learn 3d modeling and animation.  Lightwave certainly seems
> impressive, but there are other packages such as 3dMax that seem good also.
> Is Lightwave considered the "industry standard"?  Is it a clear winner as
> far as stability (won't crash on Windows XP) and usability?  Since I'm on a
> Lightwave forum, I might get a biased answer, but I'd like to hear the
> optimistic side first.

> thanks

 
 
 

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by DoF » Fri, 04 Jul 2003 21:55:04


When I look at Maya, or other 'Mac-friendly' 3D apps, I cringe at all
the pretty icons and cluttered interfaces. LW may have a plain,
workmanlike UI, but I wouldn't trade it for a free copy of Maya or any
other 3D application.

If you want to produce photorealistic renders [and blisteringly fast]
persevere with LW. It works identically on any platform, and there is
Sooo much support out there to answer your questions.

Ask yourself if you want the prettiest UI or the most beautiful renders.
If it is the latter, then you have to go for LW.

DoF
--
Reality is merely an illusion,
albeit a very persistent one.

Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

 
 
 

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by Bruce Har » Sat, 05 Jul 2003 01:00:22


Personally I think that lightwave, max, maya, softimage aren't necessarily
great choices for newbies. There are quite a few "hobbyist" apps (carrara,
truespace, animation master, 3d toolkit from www.dvgarage.com) that are less
expensive and easier to learn (partly because they aren't stuffed full of
nearly as many features as lightwave) and can serve as training wheels to
help get you to a level where the big boy apps will start to make more
sense. I cut my teeth on Eovia's Carrara but dvgarage's 3d toolkit ($99) has
been getting good reviews in the press (and if you're a member I think you
can get 35% off any purchase, at least for the next few days). At somewhere
around $100 you can get Carrara 3D Basics, 3d Toolkit (which is based on a
big boy app, electricimage), ULead Cool 3D Production Studio or perhaps a
downrev version of truespace (caligari seems willing to sell just about
anything). If you're trying to learn character animation, though, then not
all of the inexpensive tools will be a good fit (some are pretty limited in
their functionality).

Don't get me wrong. I own Lightwave and think it's an awesome tool
(especially for animation and modeling). It's just that I think it's quite a
challenge to both learn 3d and lightwave at the same time. If you're hoping
to get a job in the industry, however, then I imagine they won't be too
impressed if you tell them that you know how to use Carrara 3D Basics :-)

I've been running Lightwave on win98se and win2k and it has been relatively
stable (especially compared to carrara which sometimes has spasms and either
crashes or just won't play nice). I did have to re-install from scratch once
on win98se. Most of the trouble I've had has been compatibility with various
ATI video drivers (I guess lightwave tends to be a little more compatible
with nvidia although I like ATI cards).

Play with demos (some interfaces may make more sense to you than others),
look at the vendor sites, look at typical output from the renderers
(renderosity is great for this) and take your time making your choice (once
you get deep into a particular app it can be frustrating to switch). Also
look at the available plug-ins for each app (often the solution to your
problem will be "just buy/download such and such plug-in") and how much
support/training is available both from the vendor and from the community of
users and third-parties.

--bruce


Quote:> I'm looking to learn 3d modeling and animation.  Lightwave certainly seems
> impressive, but there are other packages such as 3dMax that seem good
also.
> Is Lightwave considered the "industry standard"?  Is it a clear winner as
> far as stability (won't crash on Windows XP) and usability?  Since I'm on
a
> Lightwave forum, I might get a biased answer, but I'd like to hear the
> optimistic side first.

> thanks

 
 
 

Lightwave vs. other 3d software

Post by edde » Sat, 05 Jul 2003 07:51:00


I agree. I started with Truespace about 6 years ago.
It really helped me migrate to Lightwave a couple years later.


> Personally I think that lightwave, max, maya, softimage aren't necessarily
> great choices for newbies. There are quite a few "hobbyist" apps (carrara,
> truespace, animation master, 3d toolkit from www.dvgarage.com) that are
less
> expensive and easier to learn (partly because they aren't stuffed full of
> nearly as many features as lightwave) and can serve as training wheels to
> help get you to a level where the big boy apps will start to make more
> sense. I cut my teeth on Eovia's Carrara but dvgarage's 3d toolkit ($99)
has
> been getting good reviews in the press (and if you're a member I think you
> can get 35% off any purchase, at least for the next few days). At
somewhere
> around $100 you can get Carrara 3D Basics, 3d Toolkit (which is based on a
> big boy app, electricimage), ULead Cool 3D Production Studio or perhaps a
> downrev version of truespace (caligari seems willing to sell just about
> anything). If you're trying to learn character animation, though, then not
> all of the inexpensive tools will be a good fit (some are pretty limited
in
> their functionality).

> Don't get me wrong. I own Lightwave and think it's an awesome tool
> (especially for animation and modeling). It's just that I think it's quite
a
> challenge to both learn 3d and lightwave at the same time. If you're
hoping
> to get a job in the industry, however, then I imagine they won't be too
> impressed if you tell them that you know how to use Carrara 3D Basics :-)

> I've been running Lightwave on win98se and win2k and it has been
relatively
> stable (especially compared to carrara which sometimes has spasms and
either
> crashes or just won't play nice). I did have to re-install from scratch
once
> on win98se. Most of the trouble I've had has been compatibility with
various
> ATI video drivers (I guess lightwave tends to be a little more compatible
> with nvidia although I like ATI cards).

> Play with demos (some interfaces may make more sense to you than others),
> look at the vendor sites, look at typical output from the renderers
> (renderosity is great for this) and take your time making your choice
(once
> you get deep into a particular app it can be frustrating to switch). Also
> look at the available plug-ins for each app (often the solution to your
> problem will be "just buy/download such and such plug-in") and how much
> support/training is available both from the vendor and from the community
of
> users and third-parties.

> --bruce



> > I'm looking to learn 3d modeling and animation.  Lightwave certainly
seems
> > impressive, but there are other packages such as 3dMax that seem good
> also.
> > Is Lightwave considered the "industry standard"?  Is it a clear winner
as
> > far as stability (won't crash on Windows XP) and usability?  Since I'm
on
> a
> > Lightwave forum, I might get a biased answer, but I'd like to hear the
> > optimistic side first.

> > thanks