BAR SHEETS question

BAR SHEETS question

Post by stri » Wed, 30 Jun 1999 04:00:00



Can anybody help me out with the concept of Bar Sheets?  Is it kind of
like an exposure sheet, only much less detailed?  Is it only meant to
syncronize 'sound' with 'animation'?  Any tips/advice to give me?
For example, in the book "Character Animation In Depth" it talks about
marking 'accents' on it, so one can match music to it... and also
doing 'sentence measurement'.  How does one apply this to a Bar Sheet?
Maybe to clear this up, could anyone direct me to a picture on the web
of a filled out example of a Bar sheet?  There is a simplified picture
in the book "Character Animation In Depth", but it's just confusing me
more!

I'd really appreciate some help with this foggy subject.  Thanks for
all your help!

John

 
 
 

BAR SHEETS question

Post by Richard Broo » Wed, 30 Jun 1999 04:00:00




Quote:>Can anybody help me out with the concept of Bar Sheets?  Is it kind of
>like an exposure sheet, only much less detailed?  Is it only meant to
>syncronize 'sound' with 'animation'?  Any tips/advice to give me?
>For example, in the book "Character Animation In Depth" it talks about
>marking 'accents' on it, so one can match music to it... and also
>doing 'sentence measurement'.  How does one apply this to a Bar Sheet?
>Maybe to clear this up, could anyone direct me to a picture on the web
>of a filled out example of a Bar sheet?  There is a simplified picture
>in the book "Character Animation In Depth", but it's just confusing me
>more!

>I'd really appreciate some help with this foggy subject.  Thanks for
>all your help!

>John

It sounds like a copy that a composer might be given (as in bars of
music) to mark out his phrasing on to select his dramatic themes.

I have a copy of "The Odd Man Out" and it has a musical stave line under
frames from the start of each section of each scene in the film.

Nick Park of the Wallace and Gromit plasticene animation trilogy used
something like the same thing whereby he'd write each single word
stretched out across (but under) several drawn frames of the storyboard
for the timing to match mouth movements.

If it's none of the above then forget what you've just read!  :-)

Richard.

Information Services Department
v'Cyentr Angleeya

 
 
 

BAR SHEETS question

Post by Billy Alliso » Tue, 06 Jul 1999 04:00:00


Quote:> Nick Park of the Wallace and Gromit plasticene animation trilogy used
> something like the same thing whereby he'd write each single word
> stretched out across (but under) several drawn frames of the storyboard
> for the timing to match mouth movements.

that's also where the 'pre-editing' is done so animating over length is kept
to a minimum

Billy

www.geocities.com/soho/square/1214

 
 
 

1. an idea: common question summary sheets

This newsgroup seems to periodically raise and discuss the same questions,
generating (usually) no new and useful information, but lots and lots of
postings - some giving algorithms, some trashing other people's algorithms,
some giving opinions, some trashing other people's opinions, and so on, all
in response to some question that has gone through the whole thing before.

I believe this will continue to occur as long as new people join the net
and try to solve the same common problems each of us has to answer.  It CAN
be a good idea to post questions to the net if your own investigations lead
to no solution; there are some very sharp people on here.  But too often
people ask questions that can be found in basic texts or common journals,
and that's where the problems with a flooded newsgroup begin.

I suggest we write a set of "Summary Sheets for Common Questions".  We could
draft these things until they were rather complete. Probably lots of us
would like to have local copies for our own use to give to colleagues who
come for such information.  And when someone on the net asks one of these
questions, someone will post the standard response.  IF there is a significant
new point to be raised that is not properly addressed in the standard
response, be assured that someone will pipe up.  But if the standard answer
covers the best answers and debunks common poor ones, net traffic
and misinformation might go 'way down.

I don't propose that these sheets should be tutorials.  They should be
SHORT: mostly pointers, formulae, and literature references,, with terse
and consise discussion where appropriate.  The question poser will probably
still have to do some independent work (probably in the local library);
these things will show the path.

Here are my proposals for starters, based on the last few weeks.  We can
always write more standard sheets or update these when it seems appropriate.

  Color conversions: RGB<->HSV, RGB->B/W, RGB->Lum
  Image conversions: 24 bits RGB->8 bits colormapped, B/W->dither
  Geometry: Point in polygon
  Rendering: intro Z-buffer references, intro ray tracing references

Before tackling these I'd like to know if there's some reason this
procedure won't be a Good Thing.  If you feel strongly about this one
way or the other, please let me know.  If you'd like to volunteer to
help draft one of these documents, let me know that, too.

Then we can get down to the Real Stuff: like how to insert aliasing
artifacts into real photographs so our stuff doesn't look so much worse.

-Andrew

   - -- ---- ------- ------------ -------------------- ---------------------

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