Business Card Set-ups

Business Card Set-ups

Post by Marion Sherman Howar » Tue, 05 Aug 2003 05:13:02



You've all been *such* a great resource, that I've got another
question for you.  ;)

I'm setting up my own little web design business, I have my logo,
etc., now I need business cards.

Advice/suggestions on what software to use?  Could I do the whole
thing in Photoshop? (I have version 7.)  Would it be wiser to use a
template with a word-processing program?  What dpi/resolution is best
for using my photoshop image for a business card?

Any words of wisdom you have to offer would be appreciated.

Thank you!

Marion Howard

 
 
 

Business Card Set-ups

Post by Taci » Tue, 05 Aug 2003 10:13:39


Quote:>Advice/suggestions on what software to use?

For business cards, Photoshop is not a good choice. A drawing program (eg,
Adobe Illustrator) or a page-layout program (eg, QuarkXPress) is your best bet.

Quote:>Could I do the whole
>thing in Photoshop? (I have version 7.)

You can, in the same sense that you can use a screwdriver to hammar nails, but
it's not the best tool for the job--a hammer works better.

Quote:>Would it be wiser to use a
>template with a word-processing program?

A word processor is also not really the right tool for the job; a page layout
program is best.

Quote:>What dpi/resolution is best
>for using my photoshop image for a business card?

Generally speaking, you should not be using a Photoshop image on your card at
all. If you did your logo in Photoshop, I suggest you re-create it as vector
artwork in a program like Illustrator.

--
Rude T-shirts for a rude age: http://www.villaintees.com
Art, literature, shareware, polyamory, kink, and more:
http://www.xeromag.com/franklin.html

 
 
 

Business Card Set-ups

Post by Stuar » Tue, 05 Aug 2003 17:43:15


As Tacit says a vector drawing program is the best choice, this will
allow you to scale the logo to what ever size you want without
deterioration. So in the future if you wanted to do some advertising
maybe on a larger sized poster then your logo will still look as good as
on the business card.

Look at vector drawing programs like Coreldraw, freehand and illustrator
as a page layout program may be useful in the future but will not be
quite the right tool. You can pick up a cheap second hand copy off
amazon if you don't want to pay the full price for them.

Stuart


>>Advice/suggestions on what software to use?

> For business cards, Photoshop is not a good choice. A drawing program (eg,
> Adobe Illustrator) or a page-layout program (eg, QuarkXPress) is your best bet.

>>Could I do the whole
>>thing in Photoshop? (I have version 7.)

> You can, in the same sense that you can use a screwdriver to hammar nails, but
> it's not the best tool for the job--a hammer works better.

>>Would it be wiser to use a
>>template with a word-processing program?

> A word processor is also not really the right tool for the job; a page layout
> program is best.

>>What dpi/resolution is best
>>for using my photoshop image for a business card?

> Generally speaking, you should not be using a Photoshop image on your card at
> all. If you did your logo in Photoshop, I suggest you re-create it as vector
> artwork in a program like Illustrator.

 
 
 

Business Card Set-ups

Post by enhypnio » Wed, 06 Aug 2003 05:43:08


Heya, got a few bits to contribute since I do business cards (and
other print jobs) on a regular basis at work. I am also having a bit
of a slowish day (waiting for approval in like fifty million projects,
which according to Murphy's law will all happen at the same instant,
with overlapping deadlines) so pardon my long-windedness and
outpouring of little kernels of acquired information.

Both Stuart and Tacit have some good points but I don't completely
agree in others:

First: STAY AWAY from programs like Word. Simply the wrong tool and
will only cause both you and your printer a plethora of headaches.

Second: and I can't stress this one enough: contact your printer. Ask
what file format works best for him/her, font requirements (some will
not take your true type fonts, and will require you to use type 1),
bleeds, etc, etc. When in doubt, these are the people that will most
likely give you the information you need, and never hurts to get all
the details before you invest time into it.

I am assuming for the rest of this post, that you are running these
cards through an offset printer, rather than a Kinko's run (although
most if not all of this would still apply)

Here comes my primary disagreement with the previous posters: it
doesn't have to be all vector. As a matter of fact, because of the
requirements of many of the clients I work with, I end up doing a
great majority of the work for the cards in photoshop, and then I take
that image into Quark Xpress or Illustrator and lay down the text.  
The reason you want to stay away from photoshop when doing the text is
that the text will be rendered at whatever the resolution of your file
is set as (assuming you flatten stuff into something like a .Tiff).
This overlooks the capability of the printer of doing linework
(including text) at a much higher resolution, giving you far crisper
text. Also, to directly answer one of your questions: YES, you could
use photoshop 7 all the way, but I wouldn't advise it. The latest
version of photoshop allows you to retain the vector information of
the text, when saved as an .eps and this option is chosen. However I
have not had the chance to test this myself, so I would proceed
carefully.

Whether you use photoshop at all or do it entirely in something like
Illustrator or quark depends wholly on what you want to do. if you
want a simpler card with just a logo and contact info, then definitely
go with a vector program or a page layout program. If you want to do
more funky stuff using background images, using bitmaps, etc then
using photoshop for that and laying the text/linework in a vector or
page layout program is the way to go.  As far as resolution goes, if
you work in vectors this is obviously a non-issue, if you work with
bitmaps then those shouldn't  go lower than 300dpi. You can go higher
to 600 if you want.

Make sure you got some decent bleed. Most places tend to go with
something like 1/8th (of an inch) bleed, but I have seen it go as low
as 1/32nd (insane) or as high as 1/4 (wasteful). And also make sure
you got some space between the bleed line and the live text. Because
the cutting is not always exact (depending also on the skill of your
printer), that can migrate a bit, and if you have content too close to
the edges you potentially stand to have some of it cropped.

Another little kernel of wisdom to prevent said printer from cursing
your entire family tree: try, as much as possible, to keep text a
single color (CYM or K, or a spot color if you are using them). More
so if the text is small. A printer will despise little else in the
world as much as he does getting a 9 pt thin text that is 4-color.
It's a pain in the rear to line up 4-plates of very thin lines and
notches and getting sharp text.

Well I hope that helped a bit (and not confused you even more)

-enhypnion

(Remove NOSPAM from email if you want to email me)

 
 
 

Business Card Set-ups

Post by Bria » Wed, 06 Aug 2003 06:13:28


Quote:> Make sure you got some decent bleed. Most places tend to go with
> something like 1/8th (of an inch) bleed, but I have seen it go as low
> as 1/32nd (insane) or as high as 1/4 (wasteful). And also make sure
> you got some space between the bleed line and the live text. Because
> the cutting is not always exact (depending also on the skill of your
> printer), that can migrate a bit, and if you have content too close to
> the edges you potentially stand to have some of it cropped.

A good rule of thumb is to use a safety margin that is equal to the
bleed; if your printer asks for 1/8" bleed then provide a 1/8" safety as
well.

Brian

 
 
 

Business Card Set-ups

Post by Stuar » Wed, 06 Aug 2003 19:49:20


I understand what you are saying but it is not a good idea to create a
raster logo as it causes huge problems when resizing. I assume you are
referring to photoshop for some kind of background for business cards only.

Stuart


> Heya, got a few bits to contribute since I do business cards (and
> other print jobs) on a regular basis at work. I am also having a bit
> of a slowish day (waiting for approval in like fifty million projects,
> which according to Murphy's law will all happen at the same instant,
> with overlapping deadlines) so pardon my long-windedness and
> outpouring of little kernels of acquired information.

> Both Stuart and Tacit have some good points but I don't completely
> agree in others:

> First: STAY AWAY from programs like Word. Simply the wrong tool and
> will only cause both you and your printer a plethora of headaches.

> Second: and I can't stress this one enough: contact your printer. Ask
> what file format works best for him/her, font requirements (some will
> not take your true type fonts, and will require you to use type 1),
> bleeds, etc, etc. When in doubt, these are the people that will most
> likely give you the information you need, and never hurts to get all
> the details before you invest time into it.

> I am assuming for the rest of this post, that you are running these
> cards through an offset printer, rather than a Kinko's run (although
> most if not all of this would still apply)

> Here comes my primary disagreement with the previous posters: it
> doesn't have to be all vector. As a matter of fact, because of the
> requirements of many of the clients I work with, I end up doing a
> great majority of the work for the cards in photoshop, and then I take
> that image into Quark Xpress or Illustrator and lay down the text.  
> The reason you want to stay away from photoshop when doing the text is
> that the text will be rendered at whatever the resolution of your file
> is set as (assuming you flatten stuff into something like a .Tiff).
> This overlooks the capability of the printer of doing linework
> (including text) at a much higher resolution, giving you far crisper
> text. Also, to directly answer one of your questions: YES, you could
> use photoshop 7 all the way, but I wouldn't advise it. The latest
> version of photoshop allows you to retain the vector information of
> the text, when saved as an .eps and this option is chosen. However I
> have not had the chance to test this myself, so I would proceed
> carefully.

> Whether you use photoshop at all or do it entirely in something like
> Illustrator or quark depends wholly on what you want to do. if you
> want a simpler card with just a logo and contact info, then definitely
> go with a vector program or a page layout program. If you want to do
> more funky stuff using background images, using bitmaps, etc then
> using photoshop for that and laying the text/linework in a vector or
> page layout program is the way to go.  As far as resolution goes, if
> you work in vectors this is obviously a non-issue, if you work with
> bitmaps then those shouldn't  go lower than 300dpi. You can go higher
> to 600 if you want.

> Make sure you got some decent bleed. Most places tend to go with
> something like 1/8th (of an inch) bleed, but I have seen it go as low
> as 1/32nd (insane) or as high as 1/4 (wasteful). And also make sure
> you got some space between the bleed line and the live text. Because
> the cutting is not always exact (depending also on the skill of your
> printer), that can migrate a bit, and if you have content too close to
> the edges you potentially stand to have some of it cropped.

> Another little kernel of wisdom to prevent said printer from cursing
> your entire family tree: try, as much as possible, to keep text a
> single color (CYM or K, or a spot color if you are using them). More
> so if the text is small. A printer will despise little else in the
> world as much as he does getting a 9 pt thin text that is 4-color.
> It's a pain in the rear to line up 4-plates of very thin lines and
> notches and getting sharp text.

> Well I hope that helped a bit (and not confused you even more)

> -enhypnion

> (Remove NOSPAM from email if you want to email me)

 
 
 

Business Card Set-ups

Post by enhypnio » Wed, 06 Aug 2003 22:39:23


Oh I agree, logos should always be made in vector form whenever
possible (and I always do). I used to do logos mostly on PS my first
year of design. I would make them large enough that it was never an
issue....until one of my clients wanted to put it on the side of a
van. At which point I had to learn good vector drawing rather fast ;).
Ever since then all my logo work is done in Illustrator, sometimes
even the sketching part of it, and I am never going back.

And yes, I was refering to using photoshop in background and other
elements in the design.

-enhypnion

Quote:>I understand what you are saying but it is not a good idea to create a
>raster logo as it causes huge problems when resizing. I assume you are
>referring to photoshop for some kind of background for business cards only.

>Stuart

 
 
 

Business Card Set-ups

Post by Stuar » Thu, 07 Aug 2003 00:44:03


I just needed to clarify that as the original poster could have
misunderstood.

Stuart


> Oh I agree, logos should always be made in vector form whenever
> possible (and I always do). I used to do logos mostly on PS my first
> year of design. I would make them large enough that it was never an
> issue....until one of my clients wanted to put it on the side of a
> van. At which point I had to learn good vector drawing rather fast ;).
> Ever since then all my logo work is done in Illustrator, sometimes
> even the sketching part of it, and I am never going back.

> And yes, I was refering to using photoshop in background and other
> elements in the design.

> -enhypnion

>>I understand what you are saying but it is not a good idea to create a
>>raster logo as it causes huge problems when resizing. I assume you are
>>referring to photoshop for some kind of background for business cards only.

>>Stuart

 
 
 

Business Card Set-ups

Post by enhypnio » Thu, 07 Aug 2003 02:44:37


I really should have made that clearer on my original post.

thanks :)

-enhypnion


>I just needed to clarify that as the original poster could have
>misunderstood.

>Stuart


>> Oh I agree, logos should always be made in vector form whenever
>> possible (and I always do). I used to do logos mostly on PS my first
>> year of design. I would make them large enough that it was never an
>> issue....until one of my clients wanted to put it on the side of a
>> van. At which point I had to learn good vector drawing rather fast ;).
>> Ever since then all my logo work is done in Illustrator, sometimes
>> even the sketching part of it, and I am never going back.

>> And yes, I was refering to using photoshop in background and other
>> elements in the design.

>> -enhypnion

>>>I understand what you are saying but it is not a good idea to create a
>>>raster logo as it causes huge problems when resizing. I assume you are
>>>referring to photoshop for some kind of background for business cards only.

>>>Stuart

 
 
 

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