lighten shadows in part of an image

lighten shadows in part of an image

Post by Jimm » Thu, 09 Jun 2005 01:00:37


I have an image that has some significant shadowing from sunlight (or lack
thereof) in one corner of the image.  Can someone point me in the right
direction on how to lighten just a section of an image?

Thanks

 
 
 

lighten shadows in part of an image

Post by Bill Hilto » Thu, 09 Jun 2005 03:22:41


Quote:>Jimmy writes ...

>I have an image that has some significant shadowing from sunlight (or
>lack thereof) in one corner of the image.  Can someone point me in the
>right direction on how to lighten just a section of an image?

If you have CS you can use Shadow/Highlight, maybe with a selection
ahead of time.

If you don't have CS or just want to do it a more generic way try these
steps ... add an adjustment layer of type Curves or Levels and make the
adjustment until you see the shadowed part looks "right" ... the rest
will be overexposed so choose the Gradient tool, set it to 'black to
white' and draw a line on the adjustment layer layer mask to block off
the effect of the Curve/Levels adjustment from the properly exposed
part of the image.  In other words, use the Gradient to mask off the
change to all but a limited area.  If you get it wrong just redraw the
line, you can redraw the gradient as often as you need ... a short line
means an abrupt transition on the mask, a longer line a more gradual
transition.

Try it, it's not as complicated as it may sound from the above
description and it's a handy thing to know.

Bill

 
 
 

lighten shadows in part of an image

Post by Mister Ma » Thu, 09 Jun 2005 07:26:02



Quote:> I have an image that has some significant shadowing from sunlight (or
> lack thereof) in one corner of the image.  Can someone point me in the
> right direction on how to lighten just a section of an image?

Another way to do it:
Select the shadow with Select > Color Range
Feather (Select Feather) about 2 px
Ctrl-J to make a new Layer by Copy
Change the mode of the new layer to Screen (in the layer palette)
Adjust by reducing the 100% to a lower number, or use Curves.
Flatten the image.

The new method in CS2 works better, though, in my limited experience with
it.

- Max

--
MisterMax  

http://buten.net/max/  
Slideshows of Angkor Wat, Bali, Crete, France, Malaysia, Maui, Morocco,
Mt Holly, Myanmar (new), Sicily, St Tropez, Singapore, Thailand (new),
Tour de France.

http://pbase.com/mistermax - Shadows and Reflections

 
 
 

lighten shadows in part of an image

Post by Bob William » Thu, 09 Jun 2005 16:26:03



> I have an image that has some significant shadowing from sunlight (or lack
> thereof) in one corner of the image.  Can someone point me in the right
> direction on how to lighten just a section of an image?

> Thanks

If the shadow is well defined, you can select it, (magic wand, one of
the lassos etc.) and then go to IMAGE > ADJUST > LEVELS and lighten it
as you so desire.
Bob Williams
 
 
 

lighten shadows in part of an image

Post by patric » Fri, 10 Jun 2005 01:02:07


Bob's method will work but there is a preferred method:
Set the Foreground/Background colors to their default black/white (D-key)

Create a new layer above your active layer.
   Layer>New Fill Layer>Solid Color  and choose Gray in the Color drop-down
menu. OK.
   Your entire image will turn gray.
   Change the layer's mode to Overlay or Soft Light. Your image will
reappear.
Paint on your image with a soft black brush to darken the area.
Paint with a white brush to lighten the area.

The advantage in using a layer is that you have immediate and future control
over the effect.
While painting, vary the strength of the effect by varying the opacity of
the brush. (Start with about 10-20%)
So now you control exactly where and how much you lighten or darken the
image.
If you paint too much, change the Foreground Color (X-key) and paint to
restore the area.

You can now get back to further edit your effect anytime before flattening
the image, even after saving it in .psd format.
You cannot do that with the Image>New Adjustment selection.

(This is a great way to get a flash-fill effect in your image.)

In general, I *always* use a layer if it offers the same function as the
Image>Adjust menu.

Good Luck! . . . . patrick



>> I have an image that has some significant shadowing from sunlight (or
>> lack
>> thereof) in one corner of the image.  Can someone point me in the right
>> direction on how to lighten just a section of an image?

>> Thanks

> If the shadow is well defined, you can select it, (magic wand, one of the
> lassos etc.) and then go to IMAGE > ADJUST > LEVELS and lighten it as you
> so desire.
> Bob Williams

 
 
 

lighten shadows in part of an image

Post by patric » Fri, 10 Jun 2005 01:41:53


Jimmy: I don't know why Layer>New Fill Layer dialog window acts differently
but it does.
Get to your new fill layer as follows:
   Alt-click on the new layer icon (second from the right) in the layer's
palette.
   In the dialog window, select Color: Gray, Mode: Overlay.
   OK
Continue as below, except for the *-lines.
.... patrick


Quote:> Bob's method will work but there is a preferred method:
> Set the Foreground/Background colors to their default black/white (D-key)

*> Create a new layer above your active layer.
*>   Layer>New Fill Layer>Solid Color  and choose Gray in the Color
drop-down
*> menu. OK.
*>   Your entire image will turn gray.
*>   Change the layer's mode to Overlay or Soft Light. Your image will
*> reappear.
> Paint on your image with a soft black brush to darken the area.
> Paint with a white brush to lighten the area.

> The advantage in using a layer is that you have immediate and future
> control over the effect.
> While painting, vary the strength of the effect by varying the opacity of
> the brush. (Start with about 10-20%)
> So now you control exactly where and how much you lighten or darken the
> image.
> If you paint too much, change the Foreground Color (X-key) and paint to
> restore the area.

> You can now get back to further edit your effect anytime before flattening
> the image, even after saving it in .psd format.
> You cannot do that with the Image>New Adjustment selection.

> (This is a great way to get a flash-fill effect in your image.)

> In general, I *always* use a layer if it offers the same function as the
> Image>Adjust menu.

> Good Luck! . . . . patrick




>>> I have an image that has some significant shadowing from sunlight (or
>>> lack
>>> thereof) in one corner of the image.  Can someone point me in the right
>>> direction on how to lighten just a section of an image?

>>> Thanks

>> If the shadow is well defined, you can select it, (magic wand, one of the
>> lassos etc.) and then go to IMAGE > ADJUST > LEVELS and lighten it as you
>> so desire.
>> Bob Williams

 
 
 

lighten shadows in part of an image

Post by patric » Fri, 10 Jun 2005 01:41:53


Jimmy: I don't know why Layer>New Fill Layer acts differently but it does.
Get to your new fill layer as follows:
   Alt-click on the new layer icon (second from the right) in the layer's
palette.
   In the dialog window, select Color: Gray, Mode: Overlay.
   OK
Continue as below, except for the *-lines.
.... patrick


> Bob's method will work but there is a preferred method:
> Set the Foreground/Background colors to their default black/white (D-key)

*> Create a new layer above your active layer. (NO. See above)
*>   Layer>New Fill Layer>Solid Color  and choose Gray in the Color
drop-down
*> menu. OK.
*>   Your entire image will turn gray.
*>   Change the layer's mode to Overlay or Soft Light. Your image will
*> reappear.
> Paint on your image with a soft black brush to darken the area.
> Paint with a white brush to lighten the area.

> The advantage in using a layer is that you have immediate and future
> control over the effect.
> While painting, vary the strength of the effect by varying the opacity of
> the brush. (Start with about 10-20%)
> So now you control exactly where and how much you lighten or darken the
> image.
> If you paint too much, change the Foreground Color (X-key) and paint to
> restore the area.

> You can now get back to further edit your effect anytime before flattening
> the image, even after saving it in .psd format.
> You cannot do that with the Image>New Adjustment selection.

> (This is a great way to get a flash-fill effect in your image.)

> In general, I *always* use a layer if it offers the same function as the
> Image>Adjust menu.

> Good Luck! . . . . patrick




>>> I have an image that has some significant shadowing from sunlight (or
>>> lack
>>> thereof) in one corner of the image.  Can someone point me in the right
>>> direction on how to lighten just a section of an image?

>>> Thanks

>> If the shadow is well defined, you can select it, (magic wand, one of the
>> lassos etc.) and then go to IMAGE > ADJUST > LEVELS and lighten it as you
>> so desire.
>> Bob Williams

 
 
 

lighten shadows in part of an image

Post by Colonel Bli » Sat, 11 Jun 2005 00:13:17


Hello, patrick!
You wrote  on Wed, 08 Jun 2005 16:02:07 GMT:

I tried this method but when I get to painting the image with a black brush
nothing happens. I'm using Elements 1; might that be the problem?

Thanks,

Colonel Blip.

 p> Bob's method will work but there is a preferred method:
 p> Set the Foreground/Background colors to their default black/white
 p> (D-key)

 p> Create a new layer above your active layer.
 Layer>> New Fill Layer>Solid Color  and choose Gray in the Color drop-down
 p> menu. OK.
 p>    Your entire image will turn gray.
 p>    Change the layer's mode to Overlay or Soft Light. Your image will
 p> reappear.
 p> Paint on your image with a soft black brush to darken the area.
 p> Paint with a white brush to lighten the area.

 p> The advantage in using a layer is that you have immediate and future
 p> control over the effect.
 p> While painting, vary the strength of the effect by varying the opacity
 p> of the brush. (Start with about 10-20%)
 p> So now you control exactly where and how much you lighten or darken the
 p> image.
 p> If you paint too much, change the Foreground Color (X-key) and paint to
 p> restore the area.

 p> You can now get back to further edit your effect anytime before
 p> flattening the image, even after saving it in .psd format.
 p> You cannot do that with the Image>New Adjustment selection.

 p> (This is a great way to get a flash-fill effect in your image.)

 p> In general, I *always* use a layer if it offers the same function as the

 p> Good Luck! . . . . patrick



 ??>>

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lighten shadows in part of an image

Post by patric » Sat, 11 Jun 2005 04:04:59


I installed Elements 3 and managed to get the desired results with just a
bit of an adjustment to the procedure.
I'm sure the method will work in Elements 2 also.

With your image loaded, click on the New Layer icon in the layer's palette.
That is the first icon on the left at the top of the layers palette in
Elements 3.
The icon is a square with a smaller square contained in its lower left
corner.
You'll get a blank layer above the background layer.
Edit>Filll>50% Gray
Your screen will turn gray. Not to panic!
Change the blend mode of the new layer to Overlay or Soft Light.
Now paint with either black or white as described below.

If you think you may to edit your image further at a later daye, be sure to
save it in .psd format so Elements will save the layer with the image.

This really is a wonderful method and I'm sure you'll be amazed at the
control it provides over the effect while providng the ability to come back
and edit the effect later.
(Just make the gray layer active and paint black or white again. If you got
it too light the first time, paint the same area with black. Vary the
opacity of the soft brush.

If I failed to step you through it to succes, please do contact me again.
It's worth the effort.
Good luck! . . . . patrick


> Hello, patrick!
> You wrote  on Wed, 08 Jun 2005 16:02:07 GMT:

> I tried this method but when I get to painting the image with a black
> brush nothing happens. I'm using Elements 1; might that be the problem?

> Thanks,

> Colonel Blip.

> p> Bob's method will work but there is a preferred method:
> p> Set the Foreground/Background colors to their default black/white
> p> (D-key)

> p> Create a new layer above your active layer.
> Layer>> New Fill Layer>Solid Color  and choose Gray in the Color drop-down
> p> menu. OK.
> p>    Your entire image will turn gray.
> p>    Change the layer's mode to Overlay or Soft Light. Your image will
> p> reappear.
> p> Paint on your image with a soft black brush to darken the area.
> p> Paint with a white brush to lighten the area.

> p> The advantage in using a layer is that you have immediate and future
> p> control over the effect.
> p> While painting, vary the strength of the effect by varying the opacity
> p> of the brush. (Start with about 10-20%)
> p> So now you control exactly where and how much you lighten or darken the
> p> image.
> p> If you paint too much, change the Foreground Color (X-key) and paint to
> p> restore the area.

> p> You can now get back to further edit your effect anytime before
> p> flattening the image, even after saving it in .psd format.
> p> You cannot do that with the Image>New Adjustment selection.

> p> (This is a great way to get a flash-fill effect in your image.)

> p> In general, I *always* use a layer if it offers the same function as
> the

> p> Good Luck! . . . . patrick



> ??>>

> ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet
> News==----
> http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+
> Newsgroups
> ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption
> =----

 
 
 

lighten shadows in part of an image

Post by Colonel Bli » Sat, 11 Jun 2005 06:27:38


Hello, patrick!
You wrote  on Thu, 09 Jun 2005 19:04:59 GMT:

Thanks, that worked great. Makes filling shadows much easier than going thru
masking.

Colonel Blip.

 p> I installed Elements 3 and managed to get the desired results with just
 p> a bit of an adjustment to the procedure.
 p> I'm sure the method will work in Elements 2 also.

 p> With your image loaded, click on the New Layer icon in the layer's
 p> palette. That is the first icon on the left at the top of the layers
 p> palette in Elements 3.
 p> The icon is a square with a smaller square contained in its lower left
 p> corner.
 p> You'll get a blank layer above the background layer.
 Edit>> Filll>50% Gray
 p> Your screen will turn gray. Not to panic!
 p> Change the blend mode of the new layer to Overlay or Soft Light.
 p> Now paint with either black or white as described below.

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1. lightening a shadow

I took some pictures today of a door. The top 20% of the door has a
dark shadow over it. How can I make this area look like the rest of
the door? I have CS3 and I tried the shadow/highlight adjustment, but
it lightens the entire door, although more so in the shadowed area. I
want to keep the rest of the door the just the way it is. I selected
the shadowed area, and lightened using shadow/highlight, and it didn't
look too bad, but there is a noticeable line where I selected. Does
anyone have any suggestions for other things I can try?

Thanks,

Peter

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